States & Municipal Accountality

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eBlog, 2/06/17

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the new municipal accountability system proposed by Connecticut Gov. Daniel Malloy to create a new governance mechanism which could trigger early state intervention, then we head west to consider whether Detroit voters will re-elect Mayor Mike Duggan to a second term.  

Municipal Accountability, or “Preventing a Train Wreck.” Connecticut Governor Daniel P. Malloy, noting that “Our towns and cities are the foundation of a strong and prosperous state,” said: “Healthy, vibrant communities—and thriving urban centers in particular—are essential for our success in this global economy…In order to have vibrant downtowns, retain and grow jobs, and attract new businesses, we need to make sure all of our municipalities are on solid fiscal ground or on the path to fiscal health.” Ergo, the Governor has proposed a new municipal accountability system intended and designed to provide early intervention for the Nutmeg State’s cities and towns before they slip into severe fiscal trouble—a signal contrast to, for instance, New Jersey—where, as we have noted, such intervention is after the fact; Alabama, where the state not just refused to act, but actually facilitated Jefferson County’s chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy by barring the city from raising its own revenues; California, where the state has absented itself from playing any role in responding to municipal bankruptcy or fiscal distress—and Michigan, where the state acts early to intervene through the appointment of Emergency Managers—albeit such intervention has, as we have observed in the instances of the City of Flint and the Detroit Public Schools contributed to not just worsening the fiscal crises, but also endangered human lives—especially of young children and their futures.

Gov. Malloy’s proposal would create:

  • a four-tier ranking for municipalities in fiscal or budgetary distress,
  • an enhanced state evaluation of local fiscal issues, and
  • a limit on annual property tax increases for cities and towns deemed at greatest risk of fiscal insolvency.

Currently, Connecticut’s chief budget and policy planning agency, the Office of Policy and Management, routinely reviews annual audits for all municipalities. Under Gov. Malloy’s new proposal, which will be outlined in greater detail the day after tomorrow in Gov. Malloy’s new state biennial budget plan, OPM and a new state review board will have added responsibilities to review local bond ratings, budget fund balances, mill rates, and state aid levels—all with a goal of creating a new, four-tiered municipal fiscal early warning system focused on the identification of municipalities confronting fiscal issues well before their problems approach the level of insolvency. Under his proposal, Connecticut cities and towns with the most severe challenges and risks would be assigned to a higher tier—a tier in which there would be increased state focus and, if the system works, greater state-local collaboration. As proposed, a municipality might be assigned to one of the first three tiers if it has a poor fund balance or credit rating, or if it relies on state aid for more than 30 percent of its revenue needs. In such tiers, the state’s cities and towns would face additional reporting requirements. Moreover, cities and towns in Tiers 2 and 3 would be barred from increasing local property tax rates by more than 3 percent per year. For cities and towns in the lowest fiscal category, the fourth tier, the state would also impose a property tax cap. For these municipalities, the state review board could:

  • Intervene to refinance and otherwise restructure local debt;
  • Serve as an arbitration board in labor matters;
  • Approve local budgets;
  • And appoint a manager to oversee municipal government operations.

The system proposes some flexibility: for instance, a municipality would be assigned to a lowest tier, Tier 4, only if it so requested from the state, or if two-thirds of the new state review board deemed such a ranking necessary, according to Governor Malloy—who estimated that about 20 to 25 of the state’s 188 municipalities might be assigned any tier ranking under his proposal, who described those municipalities which might act to seek to work more closely with the state as ones confronted by “pockets of poverty.”

In response, Connecticut Conference of Municipalities Executive Director Joe DeLong said the Connecticut municipal association appreciated the Governor’s efforts to foster dialogue and had “no issue” with his proposals, but said they should be accompanied by other changes, noting: “The overreliance on property taxes, especially in urban areas where most of the property is tax exempt continues to be a recipe for disaster…Oversight without the necessary structural changes, only insures that we will recognize an impending train wreck more quickly. It does not prevent the wreck.”

This Is His City. Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan this weekend vowed to “fight the irrational closing” of a number of public schools in the city, as he initiated his re-election campaign—and, mayhap, cast a swipe at President Trump’s Education Secretary cabinet choice. Making clear that he would not be running what he termed a “victory lap campaign,” he vowed he would seek to change the recovering city’s focus towards “creating a city where people want to raise their families,” vowing to work hand-in-hand with the Detroit Public Schools Community District School Board in the wake of the Michigan School Reform Office’s recent decision to close low-performing public schools in Detroit and another elsewhere in the state—a state action which could shutter as many as 24 of 119 city schools at the end of this academic year, and another 25 next year if they remain among the state’s lowest performers for another year, based on state rankings released this month which mark consistently failing schools for closure. Mayor Duggan added that he had called Gov. Rick Snyder at the end of last week to tell him the closure is “wrong” and that the school reform office efforts are “immoral, reckless…you have to step in.” Mayor Duggan noted that “[R]eform means first you work with the teachers in the school to raise that performance at that school; second you don’t close the school until you’ve created a quality alternative…Neither one of those has happened here.” The Mayor met yesterday with the school board leadership, and has noted that Gov. Snyder had originally taken the position that closure of the city’s schools would create a legal issue, adding: “You do not have a legal right to have no schools when the children have no reasonable alternative nearby…I’m going to be working with the Detroit public schools…We want to start by sitting down together with the Governor and coming up with a solution. That’s going to be the first order of business.”

Detroit Public Schools Community District School Interim Superintendent Alycia Meriweather thanked Mayor Duggan over the weekend, saying: “As stated multiple times, we do not agree with the methodology, or the approach the (state school reform office) is using to determine school closures, and we are cognizant of the fact that all of the data collected is entirely from the years the district was under emergency management…Closing schools creates a hardship for students in numerous areas including transportation, safety, and the provision of wrap around services…As a new district, we are virtually debt free, with a locally elected board; we deserve the right to build on this foundation and work with our parents, educators, administrators, and the entire community to improve outcomes for all of our children.”

Ms. Ivy Bailey, the President of the Detroit Federation of Teachers, which represents about 3,000 city educators, noted: “The bottom line is this is his city…We don’t want the schools to close.” Ms. Bailey said the newly elected school board had just taken office and needs to be given an opportunity “to turn things around.” A representative for Gov. Snyder could not be immediately reached Saturday, nor could Detroit School Board President Iris Taylor.

Last week, Mayor Duggan picked up petitions to run for re-election, joining 14 others, according to records provided by the city’s Department of Elections. None of the prospective candidates have turned in signatures yet for certification. The filing deadline is April 25. The primary is August 8. The Mayor, when asked who his biggest competition is in the race, said only: “[T]his is Detroit, there’s always an opponent.” “There will be a campaign,” he said. “This is Detroit.”

Mayor Duggan comes at his re-election campaign to be the city’s first post chapter 9 leader after being schooled himself in hard knocks: in his first campaign, he had been knocked off the ballot when it was determined he had failed to meet the city’s one year residency requirement; ergo, he had run as a write-in candidate, and, clearly, run effectively: he received 45 percent of the vote in the primary, and had then earned 55 percent of the vote to become the Motor City’s first post-municipal bankruptcy Mayor. Thus, in his re-election effort, he has been able to point to milestones from his first term, including:

  • the installation of 65,000 new LED street lights,
  • improved police and EMS response times,
  • new city buses as well as added and expanded routes,
  • the launch of the Detroit Promise, a program to provide two years of free college to graduates of any city high school,
  • several major automotive manufacturing centers and suppliers,
  • and a new Little Caesars Arena which will be the future home of the Detroit Red Wings and Detroit Pistons,
  • The relocation by Microsoft (announced Friday) to downtown Detroit in the One Campus Martius building early next year,
  • The results, to date, of the city’s massive blight demolition program—a program which has led to the razing of nearly 11,000 houses, primarily with federal funding, since 2014 (albeit a program which has been the subject of a federal criminal investigation and other state, federal and local reviews after concerns were raised in the fall of 2015 over soaring costs and bidding practices.) Officials with the city and Detroit Land Bank Authority, which oversees the program, have defended the effort, and, last week, Mayor Duggan said an ongoing state review of the program’s billing practices turned up $7.3 million in what the state contends are improper costs. Ergo, Detroit will pay back $1.3 million of that total, but the remaining $6 million—mainly tied to a controversial set-price pilot in 2014—will go to arbitration.
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