The Difficult Interplay of State & Local Physical & Fiscal Challenges, especially those that can threaten lives, health, and public safety.

07/26/17

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Good Morning! In today’s iBlog, we consider the fiscal and physical challenges confronting the City of Flint, Michigan as it seeks to settle on a permanent drinking water source.

Out Like Flint. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette has provided an update on his criminal investigation of the Flint drinking water crisis—a crisis which evolved from the state’s appointment of an emergency manager in place of the city’s elected leaders, and which has, since, led to steadily higher in the ranks of the state government, with the update coming as the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has sued the City of Flint over claims the City Council has been foot-dragging in approving a switch to the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA) to provide its long-term drinking water. Mr. Schuette was joined by Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton, his special counsel Todd Flood, and his chief criminal investigator Andrew Arena—with, to date, some baker’s dozen current or former Michigan or City of Flint officials charged, including two gubernatorially-appointed emergency managers who were reported to the State Treasurer. The suit alleges “the City Council’s failure to act will cause an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health in Flint.”

Michigan Department of Environmental Quality officials have acknowledged a mistake in failing to require corrosion-control chemicals to be added to the water—a mistake costly to health care, the city’s fisc, and trust in government, in the wake of lead leaching from pipes, joints, and fixtures into Flint homes and drinking water—leaving a situation today where residents are still advised not to drink tap water without a filter: five current or former state employees charged previously are from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and three from the Department of Health and Human Services, in the wake of outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease after the state-ordered water switch—a switch which health investigators have since tied to 12 deaths.

Even though state and federal health officials have yet to definitively link the water switch to the disease, Michigan Attorney General Scheutte and his investigators have come close to doing so in public statements and documents related to the criminal charges. Last September, he warned Michigan Health and Human Services Director Nick Lyon he was a focus of the investigation, although, since, there has been no additional notification. But there are difficult fiscal, as well as physical and intergovernmental issues. Richard Baird, a senior advisor to Gov. Rick Snyder, at a meeting with the Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee, last Friday noted: “Given that the City of Flint is paying for two water sources and does not have a favorable long-term contract with the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA), the lack of action is costing the city an extra $600,000 each month: The city has projected that it will deplete its water and sewer fund reserves by the 4th quarter of 2018, which will necessitate a significant rate increase for residents and business if the matter is not resolved.”

Such an increase would be hard on the city’s citizens: per capita income for Flint was $23,593 in 2015—nearly 20% below the statewide average. Thus, it is most unsurprising that Mayor Karen Weaver, last April, recommended, with the support of Genesee County, GLWA, and state officials that the city extend its contract with GLWA for 30-years: such a contract would result in about $9 million in savings, because it would lock in a more favorable rate with GLWA and address the $7 million in debt service payments Flint is currently obligated to pay—with Mayor Weaver noting the decision ensured water quality for the city that is still recovering from a water contamination crisis that stemmed from the decision of its previous state-appointed emergency managers to shift water sources and participate in the KWA project. Under her proposed plan, Flint would recoup roughly $7 million in annual debt service by transferring its KWA water rights to the GLWA. (The city was preparing to shift to KWA supplied, untreated water in 2019, with plans to make much-needed upgrades to its treatment plant to comply with federal EPA drinking water standards; however, last April, the Mayor dropped the plan to make the switch to the bond-financed pipeline and recommended the city continue to purchase water from GLWA—claiming the GLWA supplied and treated water is more affordable and would save the city the fiscal and physical risk of still another supply shift: the switch is projected to result in a $2.4 million savings, because GLWA would impose a better rate than is currently available under the current short-term contract with the city.)

The City Council, last Wednesday, voted to postpone the vote on the water plan for another 30 days, after, last month, voting to extend Flint’s contract with GLWA to September in an effort to provide more time to examine and weigh the costs and benefits of the longer term water contract—a delay which Mayor Weaver described as triggering the need to petition the federal court to determine the contours of the legal authority for the city and state to properly execute the requisite agreements to secure a long-term water source “on behalf of the people of Flint.” The state complaint, filed in the U.S. District Court, seeks a declaration that the Flint City Council’s failure to act is a violation of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and an order that Flint must enter into the long-term agreement with GLWA.

Flint City Councilman Eric Mays believes the federal court should give the City Council 30 days in which to call state officials to testify about the deal and allow the City Council to tweak it, stating he wants to amend the agreement to ensure Flint does not lose its investment in the Karegnondi Water Authority—a new pipeline to Lake Huron which was instrumental in Flint switching away from Detroit water while under the control of a state-appointed emergency manager. However, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality Director Heidi Grether had given the City Council a deadline to approve the agreement last month, writing: “The City is currently paying $14.1 million per year to obtain water from the GLWA through a 72-inch line that was previously transferred to Genesee County…Due to its decision to transfer the line, Flint will lose use of the 72-inch line on Oct. 1, 2017, absent approval of the Mayor’s recommendation: No other alternate pipeline currently exists to supply GLWA water to Flint.”

At the end of last week, ergo, Mr. Baird told Flint and Genesee County officials that the City Council’s indecision on a long-term water source was not only costing more than a half million dollars each month, but also risking “significant” water rate increases next year if something were not done soon, adding that the city’s stalling on selecting a long-term water source was imposing an extra $600,000 each month, because the city is currently purchasing water from two water sources—the Great Lakes Water Authority, from which it currently gets its treated water, and the Karegnondi Water Authority, from which it contractually would take water by 2019 to 2020. His remarks were given as part of an update on a federal lawsuit the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality filed late last month against the Flint City Council—a suit in which the state alleges the elected council members have endangered the public health by failing to approve a long-term drinking water source. He added that if the Flint City Council continues to delay its vote on the 30-year contract offer, the city’s water and sewer fund reserves are expected to be tapped out by the end of 2018—an outcome which, he warned, would “necessitate a significant rate increase for residents and businesses if this is not resolved.”

Mayor Weaver has recommended the Council approve the 30-year contract with the Detroit area Great Lakes authority, in part to ensure the cleanest water at the most inexpensive price. (The city already pays some of the nation’s highest water rates: approximately $53.84 per month on the water portion of residents’ monthly bill, according to a report from Raftelis Financial Consultants of Missouri). A 2016 report from Food and Water Watch, which surveyed the nation’s 500 biggest water systems, found that Flint residents paid almost double the national average for water and the highest rates in the country despite the city’s water being undrinkable without a filter.

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