The Election Road after Municipal Bankruptcy

08/09/17

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Good Morning! In this a.m.’s blog, we consider the outcome of yesterday’s primary election in the city which has emerged from the largest municipal bankruptcy in American history: how did the voters react to the driver of the city’s plan of debt adjustment?

Incumbent Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and Michigan State Sen. Coleman Young II prevailed in yesterday’s primary, with Mayor Duggan garnering more than a 2-1 lead, 67-26% over his challenger—leaving the other six candidates deep in their dust, clearing the way for the November general election pitting the challenger and son of a former Mayor against the incumbent who has led the city in its implementation of the chapter 9 plan of debt adjustment recovery. Nevertheless, candidate Young posed a critical issue in his challenge, asking: “What kind of comeback takes place when 48% of the residents in your city live in poverty?” He added the election was “a referendum on really the neighborhoods,” even as Mayor Duggan, in his primary victory speech last night, said Detroit’s economic recovery hinges on getting more Detroiters trained to fill in-demand jobs: “Our comeback depends on jobs: We’ve got to get Detroiters back to work. And, yes, the unemployment rate has been cut in half and 20,000 more Detroiters are back to work. But it’s not nearly enough.”

In contrast, his challenger asked voters: “What has (Mayor Duggan) done for the people in the neighborhoods?” Sen. Young was raising the challenge of almost any city: how does one way weigh neighborhoods versus downtown economic development? It has become an issue in the Motor City in the struggle over political arguments pitting taxpayer-related costs for a new $863 million sports arena and entertainment district even as large parts of the city’s still post-riot devastated neighborhoods remain. Indeed, Detroit’s demolition program, enhanced by some $130 million in federal funding, funding the subject of an ongoing federal investigation, is focused on efforts to demolish or sell its entire backlog of 30,000 houses in five years—a key step to help boost Detroit’s neighborhoods after years of decline—and, critically, to raise assessed property values. So it has not been surprising that the Mayor, in campaigning, has cross-crossed the city to highlight programs and initiatives his administration has been pursuing to rebuild commercial corridors, generate more affordable housing options near greater downtown, and stabilize neighborhoods which have been abandoned and can be more homes to crime than neighbors. The incumbent also campaigned hard by touting his Motor City Match program, which has disbursed $2.9 million in grants to businesses and leveraged $16.3 million in new investments as a mechanism to leverage neighborhood redevelopment—or, in his words: “When we started Motor City Match, we had an idea—that Detroiters who might otherwise not be able to get financing for businesses could pursue their dream if they had the talent, if they had the work ethic and we would give preference for filling in storefronts in the neighborhoods.” But the non-city campaign contributions appeared to reflect a heavy concentration coming from suburban residents, many of whom work at or own businesses in the city—something many attribute to reflecting a sense of optimism about Detroit’s future.

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