The Imbalances of Governing

May 29, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we observe the ongoing demographic exodus from Puerto Rico—and the apparent agreement between the U.S. territory and the PROMESA Oversight Board to modify old work rules.

The Imbalances of Governing. Ramón Rosario Cortés, Puerto Rico’s Secretary of Public Affairs and Public Policy, has announced the repeal of Law 80, stating; “As agreed [to] by Governor Ricardo Rosselló Nevares with the Fiscal Oversight Board, today we are presenting before the Legislative Assembly a measure of Administration to repeal Law 80, and thus give way to the agreement reached, and that removes from the discussion the elimination of the Christmas Bonus and the reduction of days of sickness and vacations of our workers.” He stressed: “We are confident that, as usual, the Legislative Assembly will consider this measure with great responsibility and analyzing the totality of the circumstances and the reality of Puerto Rico today,” adding, the “Governor exercised his responsibility to achieve this agreement that makes it possible to allocate the funds we need to develop the economy and to pay the Christmas bonus for our public employees.” For his part, Puerto Rico Senate President Thomas Rivera Schatz, one of the strongest opponents of the repeal, warned that the repeal of Law 80 seeks to favor various employers of banking, communications, and insurance companies. Nevertheless, Senator Schatz indicated he would be willing to consider it if the Board’s study details the economic benefits of the agreement.

A Demographic Fiscal Wave? Between last September and last February, that critical period in the wake of Hurricanes Irma and María, passenger exodus from Puerto Rico exceeded inflow by some 233,586 persons. In stark contrast, according to data by the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics provided to the Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics, between September of 2016 and February of 2017, there were 3,988 persons arriving in Puerto Rico than departing—albeit it will not be until we have access to newer U.S. Census Bureau information that the most recent emigration data will be forthcoming. Nonetheless, the preliminary data, based on official information, is that some 1,493,180 left the island between September and February, while 1,259,614 arrived—a pattern consistent with counts of outflows between September of 2016 and February of 2017.Similarly, a chart prepared by the Institute of Statistics indicates that the number of passengers who arrived in Puerto Rico between September of 2016 and February of 2017 reached 1,999,726, compared to the 1,995,738 that left the island.

Based on an analysis of data compiled by the Teralytics Company, a cell phone company, which compiled the data, out of the 407,465 residents of Puerto Rico who left Puerto Rico, 359,815 returned between October and February. Interestingly, however, the company also reported that more people have come back to the island than those who travel to the mainland. According to the company, about 150,000 of those who left, in their sample, preferred Florida, with the first six destinations the counties of Orange (34,858), Osceola (22,610), Miami-Dade (15,233), Hillsborough (13,091), Polk (12,262), and Broward (10,580). The other four municipalities that became main destinations for those who left Puerto Rico were: 7,455 to the Bronx, 7,430 to Seminole, Florida; 5,767 to Hampden, Massachusetts, and 5,357 to Philadelphia. Previously, the Center for Puerto Rican Studies had estimated that there may be a total of 135, 592 people who left Puerto Rico between October of 2017 and February 22nd of 2018. Thus, it appears that by the end of this year, the Commonwealth might have experienced a loss of as many as 470,335 residents since 2017, or some 14% of its population, according to the Center for Puerto Rican Studies. In comparison, the Center has indicated that between 2006 and 2016, 525,769 residents of Puerto Rico emigrated to the United States.

There is, to date, no analysis of the impact of this exodus with regard to assessed property values–and the potential fiscal impact on the island municipalities. 

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