Assessing the Promise of PROMESA

D-Day, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the status—and promise—of the quasi chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy process in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico.

Nearly two years after the Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA) was enacted to establish a federally appointed oversight board to oversee a quasi-chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy process for restructuring or adopting a plan of debt adjustment of the U.S. territory’s debt—a statute which enabled the territory to suspend debt payments effective July 1st in 2016 on its debt in excess of $123 billion, the end might be looming. The statute also cleared the way for deep cuts in Puerto Rico’s public service budget—including cuts to health care, pensions, and education. Just over a year ago, Judge Laura Taylor Swain began the process of overseeing the quasi chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy process in search of some consensus on a quasi-plan of debt adjustment. Now that plan is beginning to take shape, with, this week, the Puerto Rico Financial Advisory Authority and Fiscal Agency (Fafaf) ) informing Judge Swain that, as early as next month, there will be a plan to adjust the debt of the Government Development Bank. Attorneys for the Agency have indicated to Judge Swain that as early as June 22nd they intend to provide drafts of the legal documents which are prerequisites to renegotiate the debt of the Government Development Bank (GDB) and the deposits of third parties which the Bank has retained in its custody since its decapitalization about two years ago. The adjustment with the creditors, whether bondholders or depositors, would occur in light of Title VI of the PROMESA statute—the title which provides for a voluntary negotiation between the parties and on which the judicial branch does not issue direct judgment regarding its reasonableness. The goal is to complete such submission by August, according to Christian Sobrino, the Governor’s chief advisor for economic development, who noted: “It is anticipated that at some point in August, the transaction must be closed,” as he discussed details of the quasi plan of debt adjustment process that would mark a milestone in the restructuring of Puerto Rico’s quasi municipal bankruptcy, noting: “This is the only agreement that has both the government and the Oversight Board, and this will demonstrate the ability of Puerto Rico to reach consensual agreements,” as he stressed the importance of the agreement reached with many of the government’s creditors, adding: “Given that they will be negotiable instruments, it will be the first issue of restructured debt issued by Puerto Rico since 2014.”

According to the agency’s motion, the government would open the application process to seek the consent of the creditors on July 5th. According to Mr. Sobrino, the process of compliance with Title VI of PROMESA would begin one day later, when it is expected that Aafaf, after receiving the approval of the Oversight Board, will file a request for a qualified modification of the GDB debt in court. He notes that PROMESA’s Title VI process requires presenting a breakdown of claims by creditors according to their guarantee or priority, but that process would have already been substantially completed upon the approval of the Debt Restructuring Agreement with various funds. (At present, some six credit unions have sued the government for the renegotiation of GDB debt.)

According to the RSA, the agreement between the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) and its creditors to extend several deadlines under their restructuring support agreement, will be modified again to reflect the changes in the transaction calendar: the GDB bondholders would receive 55 cents of each dollar they lent to the former fiscal agent. Meanwhile, the depositors, including muncipios, would recover a similar amount for the deposits they have put in custody with the GDB—with, in their case, Mr. Sobrino stressing they would receive 55% of the deposits held in the bank. However, if the muncipios have loans in the GDB, their deposits would be used to settle dollar-to-dollar financing, without reflecting the 45 cents which will apply to the rest of the credits: “The approval request will seek to establish clear procedures related to the approval of the qualified amendment, including the timetable for the parties to object the vote portfolio, the request and the tabulation processes, thus ensuring that all parties with an interest in the restructuring of the GDB have an opportunity to be heard in relation to Title VI.”

To date, according to the RSA (the restructuring support agreement), through last December, the GDB owed approximately $3,765 million; it also owed $376 million in deposits to private and similar companies; and another $507 million in deposits from agencies and government entities. The proposed transaction contemplates repaying the bondholders of the municipal loans and government agencies that the GDB still hopes to recover, as well as the sale of properties of the institution, which closed its doors last March.

The Puerto Rican agency’s motion came less than 48 hours before Judge Swain is due back to preside over the general hearing of the Title III cases today—a hearing where Judge Swain must decide whether to authorize a second payment to the professionals involved in PROMESA cases.

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