States Roles in the Wake of Fiscal and Physical Storms

March 13, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the federalism challenges within Puerto Rico, where aid to local governments or muncipios for hurricane recovery appears nearly as derelict as federal aid to the U.S. Territory of Puerto Rico, before trying to untangle the perplexing fiscal challenges of public education in Detroit.

Unpromising? Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló yesterday noted that from the “beginning, we (the government of Puerto Rico) have established that this is a time where you have to see the effectiveness of each penny invested. And we are all subject to that crucible,” with his comments coming in reaction a request from 11 conservative organizations demanding, in a letter to Congress, the dismissal of Natalie Jaresko, the Director of the PROMESA Oversight Board. No doubt, part of the concern relates to the exceptional disparity in pay: His claim is based on Ms. Jaresko’s salary of $625,000 per year compared to the median income in Puerto Rico of $19,429, or approximately 60% less than on the mainland. The organizations have also requested that “the basic precepts established in PROMESA‒‒precision, transparency, and the creation of a credible plan for the return of the people of Puerto Rico to the capital markets,” urging Congress to schedule a hearing to determine whether the Board is in compliance with the intent of the PROMESA provisions. The epistle was signed by the 60 Plus Retirement Association, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance, the Frontiers of Freedom, the Market Institute, the Americans for Limited Government, the Center for Freedom and Prosperity, the Independent Women’s Voice, the Consumer Action for a Strong Economy, and the Independent Women’s Forum. There is apprehension that the letter could jeopardize efforts by the New Progressive Party and the Popular Democratic Party to provide an immediate financial injection to Puerto Rico’s municipios to assist in the ongoing fiscal and physical recovery from Hurricane Maria. Senate President Thomas Rivera Schatz, who, last year, was elected to a second term as President of the Senate, thereby becoming the only reelected Senate President during the past 28 years, and the only Senate President ever elected as such to non-consecutive terms, said he would amend the Governor’s proposed legislation to grant immediate and direct financial assistance to the 78 municipal governments, as he was presiding over a public hearing of the Commission on Federal, Political and Economic Relations. The Senate President has identified a $100 million fund to be distributed among all municipios, albeit imposing a cap of $5 million to any recipient, and conditioning the aid, granted as a loan, to be administered by the Financial Advisory Authority and Fiscal Agency of Puerto Rico (Aafaf), the Office of Management and Budget, and the Department of the Treasury to authorize it.

Sen. Schatz asked his colleagues: “Who can deny that all the municipalities had losses? The hurricane devastated the island. Everyone knows that (the damage) exceeds a million dollars. If the governor of Puerto Rico has identified $ 100 million, then we have them. If we have them, I do not think it is appropriate to establish a loan and application mechanism that is a tortuous, long, and uncertain route.” In a public hearing, Rolando Ortiz and Carlos Molina, presidents of the Association and the Federation of Mayors, respectively, insisted that the municipalities should receive an allocation of funds, rather than a loan, arguing the island’s municipios lack the funds to repay the money, with Mayors Lornna Soto of Canovanas, Edwin Garcia of Camuy, and Javier Carrasquillo of Cidra, who reviewed the number of occasions in which they have had to withdraw funds from the municipal coffers to make expenses related to the process of emergency and recovery, even as distributions to the municipios from Puerto Rico’s sales and use tax were reduced.

The La Fortaleza project establishes that the Fiscal Oversight Board will have to approve the disbursement of funds—with the revised proposal coming in the wake of an earlier proposal vetoed by the PROMESA Board, because it was not tied to income and liquidity criteria of the municipios. However, Sen. Schatz argued that in the wake of Hurricane Maria, the Board had authorized the government to redirect $1 billion of the current budget for response and emergency tasks. That is, what is emerging is a consistent issue with regard to governance authority—a difference, moreover, not just between the PROMESA Board and the U.S. territory, but also between the Governor, Puerto Rico House, and Senate—differences potentially jeopardizing the proposed legislation to inject as much as $100 million into the municipal coffers damaged by the Hurricanes Irma and María: Sen. Schatz does not favor the granting of loans to municipalities for up to $5 million to mitigate the effects of hurricanes on their collections, or reductions by patents, taxes or remittances from the Municipal Revenues Collection Center; rather he favors helping municipalities with uniform allocations of $1 million, with his proposal providing that the Department of the Treasury, the Office of Management and Budget, the Fiscal Oversight Board, and the Financial Advisory Authority and Fiscal Agency of Puerto Rico must authorize the loans.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Puerto Rico House Finance Committee Chair Antonio Soto disagrees: he argues that rather than a formula allocation, each municipio should be required to justify the amount it is requesting, noting: “That justification can be part of the project. It is not to give them $100 million, but to say: ‘I have this situation, the collections have fallen, I continued to provide these services,’” even as he acknowledged that PROMESA Board would have to authorize a project such as the one promoted by Sen. Rivera Schatz. 

Presión. The intergovernmental debate is under pressure as the U.S. territory’s cash position has been determined to be 24% below the pre-Hurricane Maria projection, according to cash flow data from EMMA as of the end of last month, showing increased financial pressure after earlier reports had shown limited deterioration. According to a cash flow summary, Puerto Rico’s primary central government account, the Treasury Single Account, contained $1.56 billion as of three weeks ago; whereas, prior to Hurricane Maria’s devastation, the government had projected that on that date there would be $2.061 billion. Puerto Rico Treasury Secretary Raúl Maldonado Gautier reported that January General Fund revenues were 12.2% below pre-Maria projections, no doubt further complicating the PROMESA Board’s efforts to certify a five-year fiscal plan for Puerto Rico: In the draft submitted last month by the Rosselló administration, the government anticipated sufficient cash flow to finance close to 20% of its debt service; however, according to the Puerto Rico Treasury, General Fund net revenues were down 5.2% in the first seven months of the fiscal year compared with projections, with the largest shortfalls compared to expectations coming from foreign corporation profit taxes ($135.4 million) and sales and use taxes ($80 million): in January, net revenues were 12.2% below projection. According to Treasury Secretary Raúl Maldonado Gautier, income taxes were above expectations, because Hurricane Maria had caused employers to postpone payments for the first few months of the fiscal year.

Let There Be Light! Puerto Rico’s Electric Power Authority (AEE) now projects electricity service will be restored to at least 95% by the end of May, with PREPA interim Director Justo González announcing, moreover, that the public utility will locate solar panels in certain high mountain parts of the island, which, he noted, was “part of what FEMA has in its hands and agrees to do so.”

Schooled on Recovery? On June 8, 2016, Michigan Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof (R-West Olive), in urging his colleagues to vote for a significant bailout of Detroit’s public schools, said the plan would be sufficient to pay off the District’s debt, would provide transition costs for when the district splits into two districts and returns the district to a locally elected school board in January, stating: “This represents a realistic compromise for a path to the future: At the end of the day, our responsibility is to solve the problem…Without legislative action, the Detroit Public Schools would head toward [municipal] bankruptcy, which would cost billions of dollars and cost every student in every district in Michigan.” Yesterday, Jonathan Oosting, writing for the Detroit News, wrote that U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said Sunday she “does not know if traditional public schools in Michigan have improved since she and others began pushing to open the state up to choice and charter schools. Recent analyses show Michigan students have continually made the least improvement nationally on standardized test scores since 2003, and it is one of only five states where early reading scores have declined over that span.” His article came in the wake of the Secretary’s interview with “60 Minutes,” where she had been pressed on her assertion that traditional public schools in places like Florida improved when students were given more choice to attend different schools, with CBS’s Lesley Stahl asking: “Now, has that happened in Michigan? “We’re in Michigan. This is your home state: “have the public schools in Michigan gotten better?” In response, the Secretary said: “I don’t know. Overall, I, I can’t say overall that they have all gotten better.” Ms. Stahl followed up, telling Secretary DeVos the “whole state is not doing well,” and that “the public schools here are doing worse than they did.” In response, Secretary DeVos said: “Michigan schools need to do better. There is no doubt about it.” Ms. Stahl then asked the Secretary if she has seen the “really bad schools” and attempted to try to figure out what has been happening in them—to which Secretary DeVos responded said she has “not intentionally visited schools that are underperforming.”

The interview resurrected a long-running debate in Michigan, which opened the door to publicly funded charter schools in 1994 and is now a leading state for charter academies; indeed, Detroit today ranks third in the nation for the percentage of students who attend charter schools, according to the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. (Flint ranks second.) Today, according to a recent Education-Trust Midwest analysis of National Assessment of Education Progress standardized test scores, Michigan students ranked 41st in the country for fourth-grade reading performance in 2015, down from 38th in 2013, and 28th in 2003; in an analysis by University of Michigan Professor Brian A. Jacob, he found that Michigan students were at the bottom of the list when it comes to proficiency growth in the four measures of the exam; according to the NAEP results, in 2015, the average math score of eighth-grade students in Michigan was 278 out of 500, compared with the national average score, 281: the average Michigan score has not significantly changed from 280 in 2013 and 277 in 2000. Professor Jacob’s analysis found that 29% of Michigan students performed at or about the “proficient level” on the NAEP exam in 2015—results not significantly different from the 30% found in 2013, or the 28% recorded in 2000. Secretary DeVos, who had taken the lead in launching the Great Lakes Education Project to lobby for school choice in Michigan, and who has consistently said the government should invest in students, not buildings or institutions, in response to Ms. Stahl’s follow up query: “But what about the kids who are back at the school that’s not working? What about those kids?;” said: “[S]tudies show that when there is a large number of students that opt to go to a different school or different schools, the traditional public schools actually, the results get better, as well.”

Last week, the Detroit Public Schools Community District announced the launch of the 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project for minority males in grades 6 through 12: a project designed to develop a leadership pipeline for young men utilizing school-based and community mentors and role models through various methods of support, including themed weekly meetings, a monthly speaker series, community service projects, and college access support. The Detroit Board of Education members voted 7-0 to launch the 5000 Role Models Project in an effort to “create and develop a pipeline of leadership from within the walls of the District’s schools, describing thus as a proven mentoring program that prepares young men for success, generated by role models in our schools who are supported by male mentors in the community.”


Motoring Back from Chapter 9 Bankruptcy

March 9, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the state of the City of Detroit, the state of the post-state takeover Atlantic City, and the hard to explain delay by the U.S. Treasury of a loan to the U.S. Territory of Puerto Rico.

An Extraordinary Chapter 9 Exit. Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan yesterday described the Motor City as one becoming a “world-class place to put down your roots” and make an impact: “We’re at a time where I think the trajectory is going the right way…We all know what the issues are. We’re no longer talking about streetlights out, getting grass cut in the parks. We’re making progress. We’re not talking all that much about balancing the budget.” His remarks, coming nearly five years after I met with Kevin Orr on the day he had arrived in Detroit at the request of the Governor Rick Snyder to serve as the Emergency Manager and steer the city into and out of chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, denote how well his plan of debt adjustment as approved by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes has worked.

Thus, yesterday, the Mayor touted the Detroit Promise, a city scholarship program which covers college tuition fees for graduates of the city’s school district, as well as boosting a bus “loop” connecting local charter schools, city schools and after-school programs. Maybe of greater import, the Mayor reported that his administration intends to have every vacant, abandoned house demolished, boarded up, or remodeled by next year—adding that last year foreclosures had declined to their lowest level since 2008. Over the last six months, the city has boarded up 5,000 houses, sold 3,000 vacant houses for rehab, razed nearly 14,000 abandoned houses, and sold an estimated 9,000 side lots. The overall architecture of the Motor City’s housing future envisions the preservation of 10,000 affordable housing units and creation of 2,000 new ones over the next five years.

The Mayor touted the success of the city’s Project Green Light program, noting that some 300 businesses have joined the effort, which has realized, over the last three years a 40% in carjackings, a 30% decline in homicides since 2012, and 37% fewer fires, adding that the city intends to expand the Operation Ceasefire program, which has decreased shootings and other crimes, to other police precincts. On the economic front, the Mayor stated that Lear, Microsoft, Adient, and other major enterprises are moving or planning to open sites: over the last four years, more than 25 companies of 100-500 jobs relocated to Detroit. On the public infrastructure radar screen, Mayor Duggan noted plans for $90 million in road improvements are scheduled this year, including plans to expand the Strategic Neighborhood Fund to target seven more areas across the city, add stores, and renovate properties. Nearly two years after Michigan Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof (R-West Olive) shepherded through the legislature a plan to pay off the Detroit School District’s debt, describing it to his colleagues as a “realistic compromise for a path to the future…At the end of the day, our responsibility is to solve the problem: Without legislative action, the Detroit Public Schools would head toward bankruptcy, which would cost billions of dollars and cost every student in every district in Michigan,” the Mayor yesterday noted that a bigger city focus on public schools is the next front in Detroit’s post-bankruptcy turnaround as part of the city’s path to exiting state oversight. He also unveiled a plan to partner with the Detroit Public Schools Community District, describing the recovery of the district as vital to encourage young families to move back into the city, proposing the formation of an education commission on which he would serve, as well as other stakeholders to take on coordinating some city-wide educational initiatives, such as putting out a universal report card on school quality (which he noted would require state support) and coordinating bus routes and extracurricular programs to serve the city’s kids regardless of what schools they attend.

The Mayor, who at the end of last month unveiled a $2 billion balanced budget, noted that once the Council acts upon it, the city would have the opportunity to exit active state oversight: “I expect in April or May, we’re going to see the financial review commission vote to end oversight and return self-determination to the City of Detroit,” adding: “As everybody here knows, the financial review commission doesn’t entirely go away: they go into a dormancy period. If we in the future run a deficit, they come back.”

His proposed budget relies on the use of $100 million of an unassigned fund balance to help increase spending on capital projects, including increased focus on blight remediation, stating he hopes to double the rate of commercial demolition and get rid of every vacant, “unsalvageable” commercial property on major streets by the end of next year—a key goal from the plan he unveiled last October to devote $125 million of bond funds towards the revitalization of Detroit neighborhood commercial corridors, part of the city’s planned $317 million improvements to some 300 miles of roads and thousands of damaged sidewalks—adding that these investments have been made possible from the city’s $ billion general fund thanks to increasing income tax revenues—revenues projected to rise 2.7% for the coming fiscal year and add another $6million to $7 million to the city’s coffers. Indeed, CFO John Hill reported that the budget maintains more than a 5% reserve, and that the city continues to put aside fiscal resources to address the  higher-than-expected pension payments commencing in 2024, the fiscal year in which Detroit officials project they will face annual payments of at least $143 million under the city’s plan of debt adjustment, adding that the retiree protection fund has performed well: “What we believe is that we will not have to make major changes to the fund in order for us to have the money that we need in 2024 to begin payments; In 2016 those returns weren’t so good and have since improved in 2017 and 2018, when they will be higher than the 6.75% return that we expected.” He noted that Detroit is also looking at ways to restructure its debt, because, with its limited tax general obligation bonds scheduled to mature in the next decade, Detroit could be in a position to return to the municipal market and finance its capital projects. Finally, on the public safety front, the Mayor’s budget proposes to provide the Detroit Police Department an $8 million boost, allowing the police department to make an additional 141 new hires.

Taking Bets on Atlantic City. The Atlantic City Council Wednesday approved its FY2019 budget, increasing the tax levy by just under 3%, creating sort of a seesaw pattern to the levy, which three years ago had reached an all-time high of $18.00 per one thousand dollars of valuation, before dropping in each of the last two years. Now Atlantic City’s FY2019 budget proposal shows an increase of $439,754 or 3.06%, with Administrator Lund outlining some of the highlights at this week’s Council session. He reported that over the years, the city’s landfill has been user fee-based ($1 per occupant per month) to be self-sufficient; however, some unforeseen expenses had been incurred which imposed a strain on the landfill’s $900,000 budget. Based on a county population of 14,000, the money generated from the assessment amounts to roughly $168,000 per year, allowing the Cass County Landfill to remain open. However, the financing leaves up to each individual city the decision of fee assessments. Thus, he told the Council: “The Per Capita payment to the landfill accounted for about .35 to .40 cents of the increase.”  Meanwhile, two General Department heads requested budget increases this year and five Department Heads including; the Police Department and Library submitted budgets smaller than the previous year. Noting that he “never advocate(s) for a tax increase,” Mr. Lund stated: “But it is what it is. It was supposed to go up to $16.98 last year and now we are at $16.86, so it’s still less,” adding that the city’s continuous debt remains an anchor to Atlantic City’s credit rating—but that his proposed budget includes a complete debt assumption and plan to deleverage the City over the next ten years.

Unshelter from the Storm. New York Federal Reserve Bank President, the very insightful William Dudley, warns that Puerto Rico should not misinterpret the economic boost from reconstruction following hurricanes that hit it hard last year as a sign of underlying strength: “It’s really important not to be seduced by that strong recovery in the immediate aftermath of the disaster,” as he met with Puerto Rican leaders in San Juan: “We would expect there to be a bounce in 2018 as the construction activity gets underway in earnest,” warning, however, he expects economic growth to slow again in 2019 or 2020: “It’s “important not to misinterpret what it means, because a lot still needs to be done on the fiscal side and the long-term economic development side.”

President Dudley and his team toured densely populated, lower-income, hard hit  San Juan neighborhoods, noting the prevalence of “blue roofs”—temporary roofs overlaid with blue tarps which had been used as temporary cover for the more permanent structures devastated by the hurricanes, leading him to recognize that lots of “construction needs to take place before the next storm season,” a season which starts in just two more months—and a season certain to be complicated by ongoing, persistent, and discriminatory delays in federal aid—delays which U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin blamed on Puerto Rico, stating: “We are not holding this up…We have documents in front of them that [spell out the terms under which] we are prepared to lend,” adding that the Trump Administration has yet to determine whether any of the Treasury loans would ultimately be forgiven in testimony in Washington, D.C. before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government.

Here, the loan in question, a $4.7 billion Community Disaster Loan Congress and the President approved last November to benefit the U.S. territory’s government, public corporations, and municipalities—but where the principal still has not been made available, appears to stem from disagreements with regard to how Puerto Rico would use these funds—questions which the Treasury had not raised with the City of Houston or the State of Florida.  It appears that some of the Treasury’s apprehensions, ironically, relate to Gov. Ricardo Rosselló’s proposed tax cuts in his State of the Commonwealth Speech, in which the Governor announced tax cuts to stimulate growth, pay increases for the police and public school teachers, and where he added his administration would reduce the size of government through consolidation and attrition, with no layoffs, e.g. a stimulus policy not unlike the massive federal tax cuts enacted by President Trump and the U.S. Congress. It seems, for the Treasury, that what is good for the goose is not for the gander.

At the end of last month, Gov. Rosselló sent a letter to Congress concerned that the Treasury was now offering only $2.065 billion, writing that the proposal “imposed restrictions seemingly designed to make it extremely difficult for Puerto Rico to access these funds when it needs federal assistance the most.” This week, Secretary Mnuchin stated: “We are monitoring their cash flows to make sure that they have the necessary funds.” Puerto Rico reports it is asking for changes to the Treasury loan documents; however, Sec. Mnuchin, addressing the possibility of potential loans, noted: “We’re not making any decision today whether they will be forgiven or…won’t be forgiven.” Eric LeCompte, executive director of Jubilee USA, a non-profit devoted to the forgiveness of debt on humanitarian grounds, believes the priority should be to provide assistance for rebuilding as rapidly as possible, noting: “Almost six months after Hurricane Maria, we are still dealing with real human and economic suffering…It seems everyone is trying to work together to get the first installment of financing sent and it needs to be urgently sent.”

Part of the problem—and certainly part of the hope—is that President Dudley might be able to lend his acumen and experience to help. While the Treasury appears to be most concerned about greater Puerto Rico public budget transparency, Mr. Dudley, on the ground there, is more concerned that Puerto Rican leaders not misinterpret the economic boost from reconstruction following the devastating hurricanes as a sign of underlying strength, noting: “It’s really important not to be seduced by that strong recovery in the immediate aftermath of the disaster: We would expect there to be a bounce in 2018 as the construction activity gets underway in earnest,” before the economic growth slows again in 2019 or 2020, adding, ergo, that it was “important not to misinterpret what it means, because a lot still needs to be done on the fiscal side and the long-term economic development side.”

Governance in Recovering from Severe Physical and Fiscal Distress

March 2, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the use of a municipality’s capital assets to get back on its fiscal feet; then we consider the fates, fiscal and physical, for many of Hurricane Maria’s Puerto Rican victims who have emigrated stateside. Are they “invisible Americans”?

Municipal Assets & Fiscal Balancing. In a surprising move, the Petersburg, Virginia City Council has unanimously adopted a motion to opt not to sell the municipality’s public water and wastewater assets, effectively ending a nearly yearlong debate with regard to whether or not to sell their public utility to Aqua Virginia and Virginia American Water, two private providers who had submitted bids in December of 2016—at a time when one of the nation’s oldest cities was on the precipice of insolvency. It would appear the decision was likely affected by several water main breaks and water boil notices in the city last month—forcing legislators and city leaders to act. In the wake of the breaks, Congressman A. Donald McEachin (VA-4) and the Virginia Conservation Network had joined forces to host a roundtable discussion on the dilapidated state of Petersburg’s water infrastructure. Under the successful motion, the Council instructed the City Manager to: 1) reject the offer made by Aqua Virginia; 2) discourage any future offers to purchase Petersburg’s water and wastewater assets; 3) reject the pending unsolicited proposal to purchase Petersburg’s water and wastewater assets. That is, the municipal fiscal and capital policy going forward is to concentrate all available city resources on devising a plan to improve the city’s collection rate—or, as Councilmember Cuthbert put it: “It was a diversion of energy…It diverted the city administration’s energy; it diverted the public’s energy; and it diverted the City Council’s energy.” Councilwoman Annette Smith-Lee noted: “For the citizens, their voice is their voice. We’re on Council because of them, and they did not want us to sell the water.”

Had the city opted to go forward with the proposed privatization and sale, the municipality would have lost control over setting the water rates—an important governance and fiscal issue, as neither the Council, nor many citizens support having a for-profit company to be in charge of the water rates. Previously, several Councilmembers had expressed skepticism about the sale of some of the city’s vital public infrastructure—even as former Richmond City Manager Robert Bobb’s Group, hired to take over the city in lieu of a chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy filing—had repeatedly made pleas to the Council to “open the envelope” and see what Aqua Virginia and Virginia American Water were offering for the system. Councilman Cuthbert noted: “Council realized that for us to sell our water and wastewater assets, it would have taken six affirmative votes, and the votes were not there.”

In the wake of that successful motion, Councilman Cuthbert told his colleagues he saw “no reason to go through another eight months of agony that was going to lead to nowhere.” The decision thus ended a year-long battle—or, as Mayor Sam Parham told his colleagues, Council Members had listened to citizens who were concerned about the sale, control over its water and sewer rates, and it never materialized. Barb Rudolph, one of those citizen leaders, where the citizen group Clean Sweep Petersburg, had questioned the idea from the Robert Bobb Group to privatize, especially after the consultants had departed Petersburg with what they had described as stabilized finances. Yet, even after offers by private companies were rejected, bids still continued to come in: obviously, private, for-profit corporations recognized intrinsic value in the system—and, of course, an opportunity for profit. Indeed, at a roundtable discussion about the city’s water and sewer infrastructure, City Manager Aretha Ferrell-Benavides acknowledged that Petersburg was still being pressured by a private vendor to sell its water and wastewater systems. The fact that Aqua Virginia leaders attended city meetings had not been lost on some residents—one even likened the private vendors to predators. Residents with Clean Sweep Petersburg took photos of empty chairs in the City Council chambers that they say Aqua Virginia executives vacated just after the Council’s vote. Now, city leaders say, energy should be devoted to improving the existing systems. In the past, necessary rate increases that the council approved were never implemented, in part because of turnover within city departments. In addition, billing issues that cost the utility system millions of dollars in recent years ended up slapping some residents with $4,000 bills, and the faulty rollout of a new utility billing system cost taxpayers upward of $1 million more. As recently as last week, some residents at the roundtable said their bills are still volatile. Ferrell-Benavides said a long-term plan to update the city’s infrastructure and improvements to the billing system are necessary and in the works.

For one of the nation’s oldest municipalities—a key city during both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, a small, majority African-American municipality of just over 32,420, with a median household income of $33,927, where per capita income is about $18,535, and nearly 28% are below the poverty level—the politics of vital access to water matters.

The Physical & Fiscal Costs of Federalism. Physical catastrophes and federal insouciance can wreak terrible fiscal and human costs. In the case of Hurricane Maria, we can see those costs as not just fiscal, but especially in the welfare of our most vulnerable: young children and the elderly. More than 1,800 children have migrated from Puerto Rico and enrolled in Connecticut schools since Hurricane Maria decimated their homeland last September—a human and fiscal consequence of both the devastating physical and fiscal consequences, but also to the difficult fiscal challenges Connecticut is already confronting. Yet, unlike the federal government, Connecticut schools have scrambled to accommodate the new arrivals—most of them non-English speakers, and they have made such human, physical, and fiscal efforts notwithstanding the cash-strapped State of Connecticut. While Congress finally approved a compromise budget bill to provide millions of dollars to help schools care for displaced students (providing the equivalent of $8,500 for each displaced student, $9,000 for each one that is not English-speaking, and $10,000 for disabled students requiring special education); that still left a significant fiscal and physical burden for Connecticut, where State House Majority Leader Matt Ritter (D-Hartford) has set up a working group in the General Assembly to try to provide “one-stop shopping” for displaced Puerto Ricans who need assistance: he notes there “is no question that schools are looking for additional money” to accommodate the influx of unexpected students, many with special needs, and he is “very pleased” Congress finally offered some help. He believes the displaced student funding, part of the budget agreement’s $44 billion hurricane response package, will help. According to the Connecticut Department of Education, there were 1,745 displaced students in Connecticut schools as of mid-February—a slight reduction from the beginning of the year, as some families having opted to return to Puerto Rico or move to other states. Hartford, a city itself in difficult fiscal shape, finds its public schools have taken the bulk of the new arrivals, 376 at last count and 429 at the peak of the migration, followed by Waterbury, New Haven, and New Britain. Yet, while Congress finally provided some aid for displaced students, that aid appears unlikely to help school districts with the children who enroll next year.

Demographically Failing. While, as we noted above, there has been some federal and state aid to displaced children from Puerto Rico, the picture is more grim for Puerto Rico’s elderly: thousands of whom reside in vulnerable conditions outside the radar of government authorities, and too many of whom went hungry and thirsty due to mobility difficulties, or were unable to save their medicines due to the lack of light, without anyone knowing. Indeed, Department of the Family Secretary Glorimar Andújar described the challenge, because, in the wake of the physical destruction, the government lacked vital information with regard to where the most vulnerable were. Secretary Andújar noted the government neither knew where the most vulnerable lived, nor what their particular needs were. Thus, the devastating storm led her to acknowledge: “We have many elderly people in homes that we did not think were going to be in such high concentrations…Urbanizations complete with elderly people who depend on and are nourished by the help given by their neighbors…They are not necessarily under the jurisdiction of the Federal District, because we enter into protection. They are people who live alone and have particular needs, who are supplied by their neighbors: It is important, for future services that develop, to know where each of these populations are located.” That is, unlike children, who could be located via the school system—and could be lifted to accommodating state such as Connecticut, or depart with their families to Florida, Puerto Rico’s most vulnerable Americans were not only left behind, but also largely unaccounted for: as indicated, due to the nature of the services offered, the agency knows about elderly Americans only to the extent that they participate in their programs, such as Nutrition Assistance (PAN), protection services in cases of abuse or the homes of prolonged care—that is less than 3% of Puerto Rico’s nearly 860,000 senior citizens—where 36% live alone. This cohort, described by some as “that population that is most worrisome,” because they are older Americans who reside in the community, but have little support—or, as the Secretary put it: “They are invisible.”

During the most critical phase of the hurricane emergency many institutions did help many who live alone in their homes, offering food or extending electricity via long extension cords, those private efforts were far from sufficient for what is nearly a quarter of the population: In 2016, more than 23.5% of Puerto Ricans were 60 or older—compared to just 19.4% in 2011. It is almost like a teeter-totter, only where it is becoming increasingly fiscally and demographically imbalanced. Now, in the wake of the hurricane, and especially after the wave of immigration to the mainland by children and college-educated Puerto Ricans, estimates are that, by the next census, citizens over 65 will reach 30% of the population.  

To tend to these older Americans after Maria, Puerto Rico actually developed alternate methods of operation, especially because reliance on telephone communication was often impossible—the government sought to provide more personal contact and identify areas of what it deemed “high concentration,” utilizing contributions from organizations such as AARP to provide services. José Acarón, Puerto Rico’s AARP chapter president, stressed that there is “this older adult population, isolated, without a support network, living alone and mostly female, and they do not know where they are…We have to make a municipal census of needs and create community support mechanisms. Then we have to talk about different models of people supporting people, that work strategically and that is part of a plan.”

With estimates that 46.1% of Puerto Ricans live below the federal poverty level, Secretary Andújar said the Department had commissioned a study to verify socioeconomic changes, especially after Hurricane Maria, to the University of Puerto Rico, noting: “We hope to have a more up-to-date visibility of what the percentages are, what is going to throw us, what are the populations that are in those levels of poverty, and, obviously, how aligned our programs are towards services towards each one of those populations that results from the study.” She noted she was unable at present to be certain when that information would be ready. However, in the wake of Hurricane Maria, and by the end of last year, there were 35,000 new applicants for nutritional assistance. Demographer Judith Rodríguez reports that, taking into account only the difficulties brought by the emergency, she can say that the number of poor people on the island has increased: the most recent figures, from 2016, indicated that, in 30 municipios, 50% of the population lived in poverty, and that in six other towns, the figure reached 60%, adding: “Today, more than ever, families need the services offered by the government of Puerto Rico to respond to the changing needs of the people.”

What about the Youngest? Secretary Andújar reported her staff is aware of the possibility of an increase in the incidence of child abuse: “It is a reality for which we have been preparing. We are active with prevention mechanisms. After a phenomenon like the one suffered by the country, after months, it is expected that these indicators tend to increase.” Her agency noted that in the referrals from the last calendar quarter of 2017 of possible cases of abuse, the totals increased month after month, albeit they were below the records of the same period of the previous year. Due to the U.S. territory’s fiscal distress or quasi chapter 9 bankruptcy, her agency has taken a $605 million cut, with Gov. Ricardo Rosselló advising her: “You do not need more,” even as Larry Emil Alicea, president of the College of Social Work Professionals, notes: “Those who stay and cannot leave (from Puerto Rico), increase social stressors and may be associated with suicide rates: In the case of parents, protective capacities diminish and cases of child and adolescent abuse increase.”


The Steep & Winding Road Out of Municipal Bankruptcy and State Oversight

February 26, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the hard road out of chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy and state oversight.

Motor City Races to Earn the Checkered Flag. Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan last Friday presented his proposed annual budget to the City Council, informing Councilmembers that, if approved, his $2 billion budget would be the keystone for formal exit from Michigan state oversight: that is, he advised he believed it would lay the ground work for ending the Financial Review Commission created in the wake of the city’s chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy: “Once we get this budget passed, we have the opportunity to get out from active state oversight…I don’t have enough good things to say about how the administration and Council has worked together.” As we had noted last month, Michigan Treasurer Nick Khouri, the Chair of the state oversight commission, made clear that the trigger to such an exit would be for the city to post its third straight budget surplus—with the Treasurer noting: “I think everyone, including me, has just been impressed with the progress that’s been made in the city of Detroit, both financially and operationally.”

For Detroit to fully emerge from the nation’s largest ever municipal bankruptcy, it must both comply with the provisions of the federal chapter 9 bankruptcy code, which provides that the debtor must file a plan (11 U.S.C. §941); neither creditors nor the U.S. Bankruptcy Court may control the affairs of a municipality indirectly through the mechanism of proposing a plan of adjustment of a municipality’s debts that would in effect determine the municipality’s future tax and/or spending decisions: the standards for plan confirmation in municipal bankruptcy cases are a combination of the statutory requirements of 11 U.S.C. §943(b) and portions of 11 U.S.C. §129. Key confirmation standards provide that the federal bankruptcy court must confirm a plan if the following conditions are met: the plan complies with the provisions of title 11 made applicable by sections 103(e) and 901;the plan complies with the provisions of chapter 9; all amounts to be paid by the debtor or by any person for services or expenses in the case or incident to the plan have been fully disclosed and are reasonable; the debtor is not prohibited by law from taking any action necessary to carry out the plan; except to the extent that the holder of a particular claim has agreed to a different treatment of such claim, the plan provides that on the effective date of the plan, each holder of a claim of a kind specified in section 507(a)(1) will receive on account of such claim cash equal to the allowed amount of such claim; any regulatory or electoral approval necessary under applicable non-bankruptcy law in order to carry out any provision of the plan has been obtained, or such provision is expressly conditioned on such approval; and the plan is in the best interests of creditors and is feasible.

Unlike in a non-municipal corporate bankruptcy (chapter 11), where the requirement that the plan be in the “best interests of creditors,” means in the “best interest of creditors” if creditors would receive as much under the plan as they would if the debtor were liquidated; under chapter 9, because, as one can appreciate, the option of Detroit to sell its streets, ambulances, and other publicly owned municipal assets is simply not an option, in municipal bankruptcy, the “best interests of creditors” test has generally been interpreted to mean that the plan must be better than other alternatives available to the creditors. It is not, in a sense, different from a Solomon’s Choice (Kings 3:16-28): that is, in lieu of the alternative to municipal chapter 9 bankruptcy of permitting each and every creditor to fend for itself, the federal bankruptcy court instead seeks to interpret what is in the “best interests of creditors” as a means to balance a reasonable effort by the municipality against the obligations it has to its retirees, municipal duties, service obligations, and its creditors—albeit, of course, leaving the door open for unhappy parties to object to confirmation, (see, viz. 11 U.S.C. §§ 901(a), 943, 1109, 1128(b)). The statute provides that a city or municipality may exit after a municipal debtor receives a discharge in a chapter 9 case after: (1) confirmation of the plan; (2) deposit by the debtor of any consideration to be distributed under the plan with the disbursing agent appointed by the court; and (3) a determination by the court that securities deposited with the disbursing agent will constitute valid legal obligations of the debtor and that any provision made to pay or secure payment of such obligations is valid. (11 U.S.C. §944(b)). Thus, the discharge is conditioned not only upon confirmation, but also upon deposit of the consideration to be distributed under the plan and a court determination of the validity of securities to be issued. (The Financial Review Commission is responsible for oversight of the City of Detroit and the Detroit Public Schools Community District, pursuant to the Michigan Financial Review Commission Act (Public Act 181 of 2014); it ensures both are meeting statutory requirements, reviews and approves their budgets, and establishes programs and requirements for prudent fiscal management, among other roles and responsibilities.)

As part of Detroit’s approved plan of debt adjustment, the State of Michigan mandated the appointment of a financial review commission to oversee the Motor City’s finances, including budgets, contracts, and collective bargaining agreements with municipal employees—a commission, ergo, which Mayor Duggan, last Friday, made clear would not simply disappear in a puff of smoke, but rather go into a “dormancy period: They do continue to review our finances, and if we in the future run a deficit, they come back to life, and it takes another three years before we can move them out.”

Mayor Duggan’s proposed budget includes an $8 million boost to Detroit’s Police Department budget—enough to hire 141 new full-time positions. With the increase, the Mayor noted, the city will be able to expand its Project Greenlight and Ceasefire programs—adding that the Motor City had struggled to fill police department vacancies until about two years ago when the City Council passed a new contract. Detroit had improved from its last place ranking in violent crime in 2014, moving up to second worst in 2015, vis-à-vis rates per resident in cities with 50,000 or more people: in 2014, Detroit had recorded 13,616 violent crimes, for a rate of about 994 incidents per 50,000 people, declining to 11,846 violent crimes in 2015, and to a violent crime rate of about 880. Since then, the city has been able to hire 500 new officers, albeit, as the Mayor noted: “This city is not nearly where it needs to be for safety.”  Additionally, Mayor Duggan said his budget allows Detroit to double the rate of commercial demolitions with a goal of having all “unsalvageable” buildings on major streets razed by 2019. That would put the city on track for cleaning up its commercial corridors, he added. The budget allocates $100 million of the unassigned fund balance to blight remediation and capital projects, which is double the resources allocated last fiscal year. Other budget plans include more funding for summer jobs programs and Detroit At Work; neighborhood redevelopment plans for areas such as Delray, Osborn, Cody Rouge, and East English Village; and boosting animal control so it can operate seven days a week.

The $2 billion budget dedicates $1 billion to the city’s general fund. Chief Financial Officer John Hill said it is able to maintain its $62.3 million budget reserve, which exceeds the $53.6 million requirementCouncilman Scott Benson said the Mayor presented a “conservative fiscal budget” which allows Detroit to live within its means. The Councilmember said prior to the meeting that he had hoped the budget would address funding for poverty and neighborhood revitalization. However, council members received the budget 20 minutes before the meeting and Councilmember Benson said he needed more time to review it. “We’re seeing some good things,” he said of Mayor Duggan’s proposals, “But I want to dig into the numbers and actually go through it with a fine-tooth comb.” Officials say city council has until March 9 to approve the budget.

That early checkered flag for the Motor City ought to help salve the city’s reputational wounds in the wake of the KO administered to the city’s bid to host Amazon. Indeed, as Quicken Loans Chairman Dan Gilbert wrote, it was Detroit’s negative reputation, not a lack of talent which knocked it out of the running for an Amazon headquarters, as he tweeted to the 60-plus member bid committee who crafted Detroit’s bid: “We are all disappointed,” referring to the city’s failed bid to make the cut for the top 20 finalists. Nevertheless, Mr. Gilbert urged members not to accept the “conventional belief” that Detroit had fallen short because of its challenges with regional transportation and attracting talent; rather, he wrote, the “elephant in the room” was the nasty reputation associated with the post-bankruptcy city’s 50-plus years of decline: “Old, negative reputations do not die easily. I believe this is the single largest obstacle that we face…Outstanding state-of-the-art videos, well-packaged and eye-catching proposals, complex and generous tax incentives, and highly compelling and improving metrics cannot, nor will not overcome the strong negative connotations that the Detroit brand still needs to conquer.” Regional leaders had been informed that Detroit’s bid had failed to move on because of inadequate mass transit and questionable ability to attract talent.

As part of Detroit’s approved plan of debt adjustment, the State of Michigan mandated the appointment of a financial review commission to oversee the Motor City’s finances, including budgets, contracts, and collective bargaining agreements with municipal employees—a commission, ergo, which Mayor Duggan, last Friday, made clear would not simply disappear in a puff of smoke, but rather go into a “dormancy period: They do continue to review our finances, and if we in the future run a deficit, they come back to life, and it takes another three years before we can move them out.”

Mayor Duggan’s proposed budget includes an $8 million boost to Detroit’s Police Department budget—enough to hire 141 new full-time positions. With the increase, the Mayor noted, the city will be able to expand its Project Greenlight and Ceasefire programs—adding that the Motor City had struggled to fill police department vacancies until about two years ago when the City Council passed a new contract. Detroit had improved for its last place raking in violent crime in 2014, moving up to second worst in 2015, vis-à-vis rates per resident in cities with 50,000 or more people: in 2014, Detroit had recorded 13,616 violent crimes, for a rate of about 994 incidents per 50,000 people, declining 11,846 violent crimes in 2015, and to a violent crime rate of about 880. Since then, the city has been able to hire 500 new officers, albeit, as the Mayor noted: “This city is not nearly where it needs to be for safety.”  Additionally, Mayor Duggan said his budget allows Detroit to double the rate of commercial demolitions with a goal of having all “unsalvageable” buildings on major streets razed by 2019. That would put the city on track for cleaning up its commercial corridors, he said. The budget allocates $100 million of the unassigned fund balance to blight remediation and capital projects, which is double the money allocated last fiscal year. Other budget plans include more funding for summer jobs programs and Detroit At Work; neighborhood redevelopment plans for areas such as Delray, Osborn, Cody Rouge and East English Village, and boosting animal control so it can operate seven days a week. 

The $2 billion budget dedicates $1 billion to the city’s general fund. Chief Financial Officer John Hill said Detroit is able to maintain its $62.3 million budget reserve, which exceeds the $53.6 million requirementCouncilman Scott Benson said the mayor presented a “conservative fiscal budget” that allows Detroit to live within its means, having said, prior to the meeting, that he hoped the budget would address funding for poverty and neighborhood revitalization. However, council members received the budget 20 minutes before the meeting and Councilmember Benson said he needed more time to review it. “We’re seeing some good things,” he said of Mayor Duggan’s proposals. “But I want to dig into the numbers and actually go through it with a fine-tooth comb.” Officials say city council has until March 9 to approve the budget.


Municipal Fiscal & Professional Erosion in Puerto Rico

February 20, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the municipal fiscal threats to Puerto Rico’s municipios or municipalities, before turning to the continuing threats to the island’s future of its “brain drain” through the emigration of an increasing number of some of the island’s young professionals.

Severe Revenue Erosion. Since the last revenue quarter, Puerto Rico’s 78 municipios—cities and towns governed under Puerto Rico’s Autonomous Municipalities Act of 1991, which establishes that every municipality (those with populations in excess of 50,000 are designated as incorporated—those with less as incorporated towns: cities provision their own services, while towns typically depend on nearby cities for certain services) and must have a strong mayor form of government with a municipal legislature. All have experienced a consistent undermining of revenues: according to the most recent estimates, that includes a reduction of $56 million which will be reflected this fiscal year relating to the payment of movable and immovable property taxes, with the increasing losses related to business closures and the mass exodus of Puerto Ricans to the mainland, even as the capital and operating costs imposed in the wake of Hurricane Maria have left, in their wake, a fiscal hurricane of their own with, likely, long-term fiscal consequences. Some estimate that the losses related to property taxes have been as much as $55 million just in the last fiscal quarter, according to Javier Carrasquillo, President of the Governing Board of the Municipal Revenue Collection Center (CRIM), and the current Mayor of Cidra, a municipio known as La Ciudad de la Eterna, or the City of Eternal Spring.

CRIM is itself governed by a board composed of the President of GDB, the Commissioner of Municipal Affairs, and seven mayors of municipios: those elected mayors hold office for a term of four years (and not more than two consecutive terms) and until their successors have been appointed. CRIM’s principal offices are located at State Road 1, Km. 17.2, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00926. In addition, CRIM operates nine regional centers located in the municipalities of Aguadilla, Arecibo, Bayamón, Caguas, Carolina, Humacao, Mayagüez, Ponce, and San Juan.

CRIM estimated revenues for this fiscal year at $827,148,824 after the discount of the municipal Special Additional Contributions funds for the repayment of municipalities debts and the 5% for CRIM operational expenses. (Revenues of the municipalities of Puerto Rico are principally derived from ad valorem property taxes and Commonwealth contributions: Act No. 83 authorizes municipalities to impose the following property taxes: the Special Additional Tax, without limitation as to rate or amount, which as mentioned above is available primarily for the payment of a municipality’s general obligation debt; and a basic property tax to fund operating expenses up to a maximum amount of 6% of the assessed valuation on all real property within such municipality and up to a maximum amount of 4% of the assessed valuation on all personal property within such municipality (collectively, the “Basic Tax”)). Act No. 83 also continued in effect a special property tax imposed by the government of 1.03% of the assessed valuation of all real and personal property within Puerto Rico (other than exempted property) (the “Special Tax”) for the exclusive purpose of servicing the government’s general obligation debt. A portion of the Basic Tax levied by a municipality may be transferred to other municipalities by virtue of the operation of the Matching Fund.) In addition, under Act No. 64, each municipality is required to levy the Special Additional Tax in such amounts as shall be required for the payment of its general obligation municipal bonds and notes; principal of and interest on all general obligation municipal bonds and notes and on all municipal notes issued in anticipation of the issuance of general obligation bonds also constitute a first lien on the municipality’s Basic Tax. Accordingly, the municipality’s Basic Tax would be available to make debt service payments on general obligation municipal bonds and notes to the extent that the Special Additional Tax, together with moneys on deposit in the municipality’s Redemption Fund, are not sufficient to cover such debt service. Similarly, Act No. 83 provides for an exemption from the Special Additional Tax and Basic Tax on the first $15,000 of assessed valuation of primary personal residences of individuals (the so-called “$15,000 Real Property Exemption”) and an exemption from personal property taxes on the first $50,000 of assessed valuation of property owned by businesses that have gross revenues of less than $150,000 per annum (the “$50,000 Personal Property Exemption”). Recognizing the importance of the real and personal property tax for the fiscal requirements of the municipalities, the government makes annual appropriations to the municipalities from its General Fund as compensation for the amount of the revenues foregone owing to these exemptions. However, under Act No. 83, such appropriations will not be provided to cover any amount of property taxes, which any municipality elects to forgive for primary personal residences registered for the first time after January 1, 1992, and personal property of certain businesses registered for the first time after July 1, 1991.

Acts 83 and 80, which the Legislature approved in 1991, also provide for the following central government contributions to the municipalities: 2.50% of the net internal revenues of the General Fund for fiscal year 2004-2005 and thereafter; 35% of the annual net revenues derived from the operation of the additional lottery system created by Act No. 10, of the Legislature of Puerto Rico (approved in 1989). There are also so-called “Designated Commonwealth Contributions,” which provide an annual amount from the central governments’s General Fund to compensate the municipalities for the $15,000 Real Property Exemption and the $50,000 Personal Property Exemption; and an annual amount from the Commonwealth’s General Fund to compensate the municipalities for the exemption of 0.20% of the assessed valuation of all taxable property within the municipalities (the amounts in the clauses, with the exception of the annual contributions from the Commonwealth as compensation to the municipalities for the Special Additional Tax portions of the $15,000 Real Property Exemption and the $50,000 Personal Property Exemption (defined as the “Commonwealth Contributions”). Act 80, for its part, established the Municipal Matching Fund, into which CRIM is required to deposit with GDB the total amount collected on account of Basic Taxes and the Commonwealth Contributions. Certain funds in the Matching Fund (the “Equalization Moneys”) are available to CRIM in order to guaranty that each municipality will receive revenues in an amount at least equivalent to that received from Equalization Moneys in the previous fiscal year. The Equalization Moneys are comprised of: the Designated Commonwealth Contributions; and a portion of the Basic Tax equal to 1% of the assessed value of personal property and 3% of the assessed value of real property collected by each municipality (the “Designated Basic Tax”)—with all All Equalization funds distributed to the municipalities as follows: first, as may be required so that each municipality receives at least the same amount of aggregate revenues received during the previous fiscal year on account of Equalization Moneys, using first the Designated Commonwealth Contributions, and then, to the extent necessary, the Designated Basic Tax (it has never been necessary to use the Designated Basic Tax to perform such equalization); second, Designated Basic Taxes remaining in the Equalization Moneys are allocated to the municipalities in proportion to the amount by which revenues from their Basic Taxes in such fiscal year exceed their revenues from Basic Taxes in the previous fiscal year; and third, to all municipalities based on certain economic and demographic criteria specified in Act No. 80. The remaining Matching Fund moneys are returned to the municipalities whose Basic Tax levies gave rise to such remaining moneys, and are used, with their other revenues, to meet operating expenses. (Prior to July 1, 1993, the Secretary of the Treasury collected all municipal taxes upon real and personal property, including intangible property) in each municipality; since July 1, 1993, and pursuant to Act No. 80, CRIM has undertaken all of the Secretary of the Treasury’s responsibilities relating to the collection and distribution of such taxes. CRIM is responsible for the appraisal, assessment, notice of imposition, and collection of all municipal property taxes. All property taxes collected by CRIM are deposited at GDB, which acts as fiscal agent to the government and its municipalities. Real property is assessed by CRIM and personal property is self-assessed. These assessment values have not been adjusted to reflect the various applicable real property and personal property exemptions, such as those described under Municipal Revenues above and other exemptions granted under Puerto Rico tax incentives laws. As mentioned above, no real property reassessment has been made in Puerto Rico since 1958. All real property taxes are assessed on the basis of the replacement cost of the related real property in fiscal year 1957-58 values, regardless of when such property was constructed.

Unsheltered from the Storm. For some municipios, the cut in their remittances in the wake of Hurricane Maria reached as much as $6 million, as is the case of San Juan; however, in percentage terms, the most affected were Guayanilla and Manatí, with a reduction of 11.7% and 11.4%, respectively—meaning those municipios were forced to make signal fiscal adjustments even as expenses were swiftly rising. Indeed, as Mr. Carrasquillo had already warned, there would be a $30 million reduction from lotteries, even as collections between July and December were projected to be down by 15%. And even that amount has been assessed as only a start: In addition to the $ 56 million, municipios will have to deduct the money they have stopped receiving due to the elimination of the Sales and Use Tax on processed foods approved by the government in the wake of Hurricane Maria—as well as the exemption of the SUT collection for small businesses, with sales volumes for less than a million dollars, which was applied between November 20 and December 31. (Usually that 1% of SUT goes to municipalities to be used for essential services, such as garbage collection.) Mr. Carrasquillo said that the impact of the SUT exemption will not be measurable until they receive the Municipal Finance Corporation report; nor will the reduction which municipalities will have in their public coffers from the licenses payment: “Businesses file the license form once the economic activity year passed, so that will not be defined until January of 2019. We can only speculate now,” he added—with his own municipio having experienced the closure of some 123 businesses in the wake of the storm.

The current budget of Caguas, a municipio of about 142,000, is $ 92 million, an amount which reflects a reduction of $26,000 in the wake of rental space declines, as well as business related income losses and a court loss after an anticipated gain from a municipal initiative imposed on businesses which generated more than $3 million annually was struck down by the courts. In the municipio, some 25% of the nearly 5,000 shops remain closed, meaning, as the Mayor worries: “I cannot guarantee essential services for the population if the funds we need do not come.” The president of the Mayors Federation, Carlos Molina, estimated the direct impact in his municipality, Arecibo, to be $5 million, including the 20% in CRIM reduction. Thus, he reflects, municipios have no choice but to reduce operational expenses and establish consortiums to provide services to achieve lower costs: “We have to be realistic about how the island lives today, but we have to look for options and not wait for a miracle to happen.”

Mayor Rolando Ortiz of Cayey adds that the urgency of the municipalities is no longer limited to furloughs, but to shutdowns and closings: “There is no way out, because the municipal institution is misunderstood by the Governor. They see how effective we were before, during and after the hurricane, but now, when apparently that crisis has already passed and we say ‘we want to help,’ they are not there.” In his city, the CRIM reduction will be $700,000: “When they reduce money for municipalities, they are taking money from the most needy people of the island. Poverty is increasing.” But hope for a turnaround, in the wake of the PROMESA Board’s non-certification of Senate Bill 774 which would create a $100 million Municipal Recovery Fund, has been dashed.

Undercutting Hopes for a Recovery from the Storm. In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, Florida Hospital, which operates 26 hospitals throughout the Gator state, the hospital has recruited as many as 45 health care professionals from Puerto Rico, including nurses, medical technologists, and nutrition specialists. With a mainland nursing shortage and an aging U.S. population, which is fueling demand for health care services, estimates are that the U.S. will need to produce over one million new registered nurses by 2022 to fill newly created jobs and replace a legion of soon-to-be retirees, meaning, that Florida, the premier retiree state in the nation, commenced an international recruitment program for nurses a decade ago, but, in recent years, has looked increasingly at Puerto as one of its most promising pipelines for talent. Prior to Hurricane Maria, about 3% of Florida Hospital’s nurses came from Puerto Rico as a growing number of its residents migrated to the U.S. to escape the economic problems plaguing the island; however, that percentage is expected to double; in fact, Florida Hospital has even developed an outreach program, partnering with community groups to find and help healthcare professionals from Puerto Rico find jobs. The hospital also fast tracks the hiring process: interviews, applications, as well as getting the state requirements for nursing are all expedited. In nearby Missouri, CoxHealth, a nonprofit regional healthcare system operating six hospitals and 80 clinics, initiated a nurse recruitment effort in Puerto Rico last spring, describing recruitment as an easier option compared to other countries because of work visa, language, and other issues. For nursing professionals from Puerto Rico, where pay can be $14.15 an hour, long shifts, and attending to as many as 15 patients at a time because of hospital was understaffing, the move to Florida would seem almost a no-brainer: the pay in Florida is $25.71 per hour—and the case load far lower. Mary Perrone, the international recruiter for Florida Hospital, said 20 more nurses from Puerto Rico will finish training and be on staff in the coming weeks; CoxHealth sent a recruiting team to Puerto Rico last weekend for on-site interviews with nursing candidates. If all goes well, it hopes to hire 30 more nurses soon.


Let there Be Light & Emergency Relief

February 12, 2018

Good Morning! In today’s Blog, we consider the courtroom efforts to secure emergency relief so that electric service is not disrupted in Puerto Rico—threatening critical services and the island’s only hopes for recovery from its quasi chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy.

Dark Fiscal Imbalances.  U.S. District Judge Laura Taylor Swain last night rejected a motion filed by the PROMESA Oversight Board for the central government to grant an emergency loan to the Electric Power Authority (PREPA), indicating that the federal agency failed to demonstrate the need for this financing although there is an immediate need for liquidity, albeit, she indicated the Board may file a new amended motion requesting a lesser amount and make adjustments to clarify the payment priority that financing will have without affecting the rights of the creditors—with her ruling coming down in the wake of a six and a half hour hearing at which the court was unconvinced of their respective arguments that PREPA needed the nearly $1 billion it had requested in its initial motion. Judge Swain indicated that any new financing requested should not exceed about $ 300 million—telling the court: “The lights cannot be turned off in Puerto Rico,” as she advised the parties she will need a clearer understanding of the priorities for any new financing. She made that ruling notwithstanding the warning from PREPA financial advisor Todd Filsinger, who advised the court that if a loan were not received as soon as possible, PREPA would be forced to activate its emergency plan to begin the cessation of operations and an eventual suspension of electric service.

The courtroom drama came as the Chief Financial Advisor of the Electric Power Authority (AEE), Todd Filsinger, yesterday indicated that the public corporation intends to implement an emergency plan starting today which could lead to the suspension of its employees as well as disruption of the operations of its generating plants—actions which would force the “rationing” of electric services, likely plunging homes, businesses, and industries into darkness” an emergency loan from the central government.  Mr. Filsinger made clear that should the plan be triggered, there would be a warning, as early as this morning, followed by a rolling suspension of operations, and a gradual suspension of employees; services to hospitals, police stations, firefighters, and gas stations would continue.

PREPA is seeking a loan of as much as $1.3 billion—a request the Board did not reject out of hand, but rather indicated a lesser amount of as much as $1 billion might be considered. In principle, the loan would be around $ 1,300 million, but last night the Board of Fiscal Supervision (JSF), acting on behalf of the government and the AEE, modified its request to about $ 1,000 million. There is urgency: Mr. Filsinger warned that unless PREPA receives an emergency loan by this weekend, the utility would only be able to maintain its operations for several additional weeks, after which it would no longer even be able to pay for the fuel it needs to generate electricity, testifying: “If we do not have the loan, and we do not receive the cash, we could be implementing the contingency measures on Saturday.”

Earlier in the hearing, Joseph Davis, the lawyer representing the Financial Advisory Authority and Fiscal Agency, warned of the fiscal cliff the agency faces, advising the panel it has delayed payments to suppliers as much as possible in an effort to preserve as much of its funds as possible, in attempt to render the cash they have available, but that there will be little option but to trigger additional contingencies, such as rationing services, partly because fuel suppliers have already threatened to halt service. The power authority’s emergency plan would be enforced even as some 400,000 subscribers remain without power, and after approximately 1.1 million subscribers had already experienced the longest interruption of electric service in Puerto Rico’s history in the immediate wake of Hurricane Maria. The threat to human life and safety came as the respective parties in the New York City courtroom—parties representing the Board, bondholders, and Puerto Rico, as well as insurers continued to file motions.

As if these human risks were insufficient, Judge Swain has also been confronted with arguments from contractors, such as ARC, Lord Electric, and Whitefish Holdings, who claim that PREPA must meet its payment obligations for restoration of the electricity grid after Hurricane Maria, as well as bondholders—who, for the most part, live far, far from Puerto Rico, but are seeking compensation for impairment of the rights of municipal bondholders.

The Board, at the end of last month, alleging that PREPA faces losses in excess of $1 billion, had requested Judge Swain to approve a post-requisition loan for the public utility—a loan critical to . According to the motion issued by the JSF, seeking a super priority, as PREPA sought the fiscal and physical capacity to insure its operations until the end of the fiscal year and avoid closing operations this month—in effect, asking the court to provide a super priority of payment to the central government.

Yesterday, in a last-ditch effort to assist the power authority, the Ad Hoc-AEE group and the insurance company, Syncora, which guarantee part of the public corporation’s debt, presented a new financing proposal, a proposal which the oversight Board rejected outright, noting: “The notification of the group of bondholders of the ESA is not a valid proposal and does not have a strong reason to deny the motion for post-petition financing for the PREPA.”


A Valentine’s Day Message?

St. Valentine’s Day, 2018

Good Morning! In today’s Blog, we consider the continued scrutiny by the PROMESA Board and Puerto Rico’s progress in not just recovering from Hurricane Maria—but also from its quasi chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy. That progress has been achieved through federal assistance, the Board’s vigorous oversight, and, as we note, tax and spending changes undertaken by the government of Puerto Rico.  

Fiscal Imbalances.  While states, cities, and counties operate in regular order, the federal shutdown, far into the federal fiscal year, illustrated the challenge to state and local governments of the unpredictability of federal funding that state and local governments would otherwise count upon. Now, in the wake of Congress’ vote to suspend the national debt ceiling, the package included nearly $100 billion in disaster aid, as well as extend a number of expired tax provisions, including a Jan. 1, 2022 extension of the rum cover-over for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands—an extension projected to generate an estimated $900 million for the two U.S. territories, as well as a related tax provision which would, at long last, allow low-income Puerto Rican muncipios to be treated as qualified opportunity zones: that disaster aid includes $4.9 billion to provide 100% federal funding for Medicaid health services for low-income residents of Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands for two years and $11 billion of Community Development Block Grants for the two territories, including $2 billion of CDBG money to rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid. Puerto Rico anticipates it will be the recipient of as much as $18 billion—with an option to access a line of credit of as much as $4 billion—albeit, to the extent the territory can continue to demonstrate its lack of liquidity. Those amounts, including $4.8 billion in Medicaid, and $11 billion from HUD, however, are subject to conditions of both the federal government and the PROMESA Board. HUD Deputy Secretary Pamela Hughes Patenaude last week stated HUD would award $1.5 billion to assist in the repair of damaged homes and business structure, while FEMA has already awarded $300 million, half of which is via a loan. In addition, the aid includes $14 million in the Women, Infants & Children (WIC) program assistance. The package provides some $14 million for the Army Corps of Engineers to award contracts to U.S. electric companies to repair the power grid. Importantly, the FEMA funding will provide not just for improvements in the island’s public power system, but also for repairs: Puerto Rico has guestimated it will require $ 94.4 billion to rebuild the island’s public infrastructure.

Puerto Rico’s non-voting Representative in Congress, Jenniffer González, noted the next disaster relief resolution may be discussed in Congress later this Spring—at which point she anticipates the critical focus Will be on Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. She noted: “Speaker Paul Ryan told me that there is going to be a fourth bill on supplementary allocations for Puerto Rico with specific projects for transportation and electric power.” U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) noted that claims of states such as Florida and Texas were very helpful in recent efforts in favor of funds for Puerto Rico; however, he warned that Congress needs to allocate additional funds for disasters regularly: “There are other places that, by then, will have needs.”

Negocios. Meanwhile, with regard to the fiscal storm, the fiscal amendments Governor Ricardo Rosselló presented to the PROMESA this week presented a more positive outlook for creditors to reach an accumulated surplus of $3,400 million, even as his offer retained virtually unchanged the terms of fiscal measures and severe cuts in government revenues over the next 5 fiscal years. The plan the Governor presented, moreover, did not comply with the requirements to reduce the pensions of government retirees, nor to eliminate additional labor protections for private sector workers, after the notification of violation of the federal PROMESA law—demands calling for a series of amendments, including a 25% reduction in pensions exceeding $1,000 per month (in combination with social insurance), in addition to the elimination of a series of protections for private sector employees. Indeed, in an interview with El Vocero, Gov. Rosselló replied that his administration is neither contemplating reductions to pensions nor including legislation to eliminate the employer’s obligation to pay the Christmas bonus and compensation for unjustified dismissal or to reduce the requirements for vacation leave and sick leave, stating: “We are not contemplating reductions in pensions.” As for eliminating labor protections, the Governor made clear: “We have not included that in the reform of human capital… certainly, it is an area that is important for us to work: how do we raise labor participation in Puerto Rico? How do we encourage them to transition to work? “

The most dramatic modification of the tax plan proposed by Gov. Rossello is the elimination of the aggregate deficit of $3,400 million for the FY2022 budget, since the previous version of its fiscal plan was in default with the objective of eliminating structural deficits: as early as FY2019, he projects the government will achieve a surplus of $750 million, thanks in large part, according to the Governor, to the federal assistance provided by Congress. Even though it had been estimated that the aid to date has reached $16.5 million, Puerto Rican authorities assert only $12,800 million has been incorporated as a result of supplementary allocations in the fiscal plan—allocations related to the FEMA $ 35.3 billion in the public assistance program and $21 billion in private insurance. The Governor noted his administration plans to spend $13 million of disaster recovery funds for Hurricane Maria, enabling, he added, a GDP growth projection of 8.4%. He also noted he expects a reduction in the rate of emigration from Puerto Rico down to 2.4%.

Unsurprisingly, he warned, the most difficult challenge will be what he termed the FY2020 Medicaid fiscal cliff –the year when the current Congressional appropriated funds will be exhausted. To address that abyss, he said the government has intensified cuts to government programs, as well as adopted measures to increase revenues, resulting, he asserted, in a positive or surplus balance of $800 million for FY 2023, noting: “Stabilization (the surplus) continues with other structural measures and impacts that have: the reduction in expenditures by government items and the rightsizing (shrinking) that is being done.” It appears that the $800 million projected surplus was included in the analysis of the sustainability of the public debt, an element which will be considered by the PROMESA quasi-bankruptcy court for the payment arrangement to the creditors—or, as he put it: “The discussion with the creditors will go by Title III, in everything that has not been agreed by Title VI. It is a numerical exercise, without differentiating creditors, about the numbers that reflect the fiscal plan, and that will certainly be part of the elements of judgment…that the judge would use in her determinations.”

The Governor noted that cuts to agencies such as Education, Corrections, Health, as well as across the board via shrinking services and utilizing tighter payroll control have succeeded in increasing revenues by $29 million; nevertheless, he added, because the new revenues failed to meet the anticipated goals, the agency, Mi Salud, will continue to be required to face an FY2022 reduction of some $795.