Motoring Back from Chapter 9 Bankruptcy

March 9, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the state of the City of Detroit, the state of the post-state takeover Atlantic City, and the hard to explain delay by the U.S. Treasury of a loan to the U.S. Territory of Puerto Rico.

An Extraordinary Chapter 9 Exit. Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan yesterday described the Motor City as one becoming a “world-class place to put down your roots” and make an impact: “We’re at a time where I think the trajectory is going the right way…We all know what the issues are. We’re no longer talking about streetlights out, getting grass cut in the parks. We’re making progress. We’re not talking all that much about balancing the budget.” His remarks, coming nearly five years after I met with Kevin Orr on the day he had arrived in Detroit at the request of the Governor Rick Snyder to serve as the Emergency Manager and steer the city into and out of chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, denote how well his plan of debt adjustment as approved by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes has worked.

Thus, yesterday, the Mayor touted the Detroit Promise, a city scholarship program which covers college tuition fees for graduates of the city’s school district, as well as boosting a bus “loop” connecting local charter schools, city schools and after-school programs. Maybe of greater import, the Mayor reported that his administration intends to have every vacant, abandoned house demolished, boarded up, or remodeled by next year—adding that last year foreclosures had declined to their lowest level since 2008. Over the last six months, the city has boarded up 5,000 houses, sold 3,000 vacant houses for rehab, razed nearly 14,000 abandoned houses, and sold an estimated 9,000 side lots. The overall architecture of the Motor City’s housing future envisions the preservation of 10,000 affordable housing units and creation of 2,000 new ones over the next five years.

The Mayor touted the success of the city’s Project Green Light program, noting that some 300 businesses have joined the effort, which has realized, over the last three years a 40% in carjackings, a 30% decline in homicides since 2012, and 37% fewer fires, adding that the city intends to expand the Operation Ceasefire program, which has decreased shootings and other crimes, to other police precincts. On the economic front, the Mayor stated that Lear, Microsoft, Adient, and other major enterprises are moving or planning to open sites: over the last four years, more than 25 companies of 100-500 jobs relocated to Detroit. On the public infrastructure radar screen, Mayor Duggan noted plans for $90 million in road improvements are scheduled this year, including plans to expand the Strategic Neighborhood Fund to target seven more areas across the city, add stores, and renovate properties. Nearly two years after Michigan Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof (R-West Olive) shepherded through the legislature a plan to pay off the Detroit School District’s debt, describing it to his colleagues as a “realistic compromise for a path to the future…At the end of the day, our responsibility is to solve the problem: Without legislative action, the Detroit Public Schools would head toward bankruptcy, which would cost billions of dollars and cost every student in every district in Michigan,” the Mayor yesterday noted that a bigger city focus on public schools is the next front in Detroit’s post-bankruptcy turnaround as part of the city’s path to exiting state oversight. He also unveiled a plan to partner with the Detroit Public Schools Community District, describing the recovery of the district as vital to encourage young families to move back into the city, proposing the formation of an education commission on which he would serve, as well as other stakeholders to take on coordinating some city-wide educational initiatives, such as putting out a universal report card on school quality (which he noted would require state support) and coordinating bus routes and extracurricular programs to serve the city’s kids regardless of what schools they attend.

The Mayor, who at the end of last month unveiled a $2 billion balanced budget, noted that once the Council acts upon it, the city would have the opportunity to exit active state oversight: “I expect in April or May, we’re going to see the financial review commission vote to end oversight and return self-determination to the City of Detroit,” adding: “As everybody here knows, the financial review commission doesn’t entirely go away: they go into a dormancy period. If we in the future run a deficit, they come back.”

His proposed budget relies on the use of $100 million of an unassigned fund balance to help increase spending on capital projects, including increased focus on blight remediation, stating he hopes to double the rate of commercial demolition and get rid of every vacant, “unsalvageable” commercial property on major streets by the end of next year—a key goal from the plan he unveiled last October to devote $125 million of bond funds towards the revitalization of Detroit neighborhood commercial corridors, part of the city’s planned $317 million improvements to some 300 miles of roads and thousands of damaged sidewalks—adding that these investments have been made possible from the city’s $ billion general fund thanks to increasing income tax revenues—revenues projected to rise 2.7% for the coming fiscal year and add another $6million to $7 million to the city’s coffers. Indeed, CFO John Hill reported that the budget maintains more than a 5% reserve, and that the city continues to put aside fiscal resources to address the  higher-than-expected pension payments commencing in 2024, the fiscal year in which Detroit officials project they will face annual payments of at least $143 million under the city’s plan of debt adjustment, adding that the retiree protection fund has performed well: “What we believe is that we will not have to make major changes to the fund in order for us to have the money that we need in 2024 to begin payments; In 2016 those returns weren’t so good and have since improved in 2017 and 2018, when they will be higher than the 6.75% return that we expected.” He noted that Detroit is also looking at ways to restructure its debt, because, with its limited tax general obligation bonds scheduled to mature in the next decade, Detroit could be in a position to return to the municipal market and finance its capital projects. Finally, on the public safety front, the Mayor’s budget proposes to provide the Detroit Police Department an $8 million boost, allowing the police department to make an additional 141 new hires.

Taking Bets on Atlantic City. The Atlantic City Council Wednesday approved its FY2019 budget, increasing the tax levy by just under 3%, creating sort of a seesaw pattern to the levy, which three years ago had reached an all-time high of $18.00 per one thousand dollars of valuation, before dropping in each of the last two years. Now Atlantic City’s FY2019 budget proposal shows an increase of $439,754 or 3.06%, with Administrator Lund outlining some of the highlights at this week’s Council session. He reported that over the years, the city’s landfill has been user fee-based ($1 per occupant per month) to be self-sufficient; however, some unforeseen expenses had been incurred which imposed a strain on the landfill’s $900,000 budget. Based on a county population of 14,000, the money generated from the assessment amounts to roughly $168,000 per year, allowing the Cass County Landfill to remain open. However, the financing leaves up to each individual city the decision of fee assessments. Thus, he told the Council: “The Per Capita payment to the landfill accounted for about .35 to .40 cents of the increase.”  Meanwhile, two General Department heads requested budget increases this year and five Department Heads including; the Police Department and Library submitted budgets smaller than the previous year. Noting that he “never advocate(s) for a tax increase,” Mr. Lund stated: “But it is what it is. It was supposed to go up to $16.98 last year and now we are at $16.86, so it’s still less,” adding that the city’s continuous debt remains an anchor to Atlantic City’s credit rating—but that his proposed budget includes a complete debt assumption and plan to deleverage the City over the next ten years.

Unshelter from the Storm. New York Federal Reserve Bank President, the very insightful William Dudley, warns that Puerto Rico should not misinterpret the economic boost from reconstruction following hurricanes that hit it hard last year as a sign of underlying strength: “It’s really important not to be seduced by that strong recovery in the immediate aftermath of the disaster,” as he met with Puerto Rican leaders in San Juan: “We would expect there to be a bounce in 2018 as the construction activity gets underway in earnest,” warning, however, he expects economic growth to slow again in 2019 or 2020: “It’s “important not to misinterpret what it means, because a lot still needs to be done on the fiscal side and the long-term economic development side.”

President Dudley and his team toured densely populated, lower-income, hard hit  San Juan neighborhoods, noting the prevalence of “blue roofs”—temporary roofs overlaid with blue tarps which had been used as temporary cover for the more permanent structures devastated by the hurricanes, leading him to recognize that lots of “construction needs to take place before the next storm season,” a season which starts in just two more months—and a season certain to be complicated by ongoing, persistent, and discriminatory delays in federal aid—delays which U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin blamed on Puerto Rico, stating: “We are not holding this up…We have documents in front of them that [spell out the terms under which] we are prepared to lend,” adding that the Trump Administration has yet to determine whether any of the Treasury loans would ultimately be forgiven in testimony in Washington, D.C. before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government.

Here, the loan in question, a $4.7 billion Community Disaster Loan Congress and the President approved last November to benefit the U.S. territory’s government, public corporations, and municipalities—but where the principal still has not been made available, appears to stem from disagreements with regard to how Puerto Rico would use these funds—questions which the Treasury had not raised with the City of Houston or the State of Florida.  It appears that some of the Treasury’s apprehensions, ironically, relate to Gov. Ricardo Rosselló’s proposed tax cuts in his State of the Commonwealth Speech, in which the Governor announced tax cuts to stimulate growth, pay increases for the police and public school teachers, and where he added his administration would reduce the size of government through consolidation and attrition, with no layoffs, e.g. a stimulus policy not unlike the massive federal tax cuts enacted by President Trump and the U.S. Congress. It seems, for the Treasury, that what is good for the goose is not for the gander.

At the end of last month, Gov. Rosselló sent a letter to Congress concerned that the Treasury was now offering only $2.065 billion, writing that the proposal “imposed restrictions seemingly designed to make it extremely difficult for Puerto Rico to access these funds when it needs federal assistance the most.” This week, Secretary Mnuchin stated: “We are monitoring their cash flows to make sure that they have the necessary funds.” Puerto Rico reports it is asking for changes to the Treasury loan documents; however, Sec. Mnuchin, addressing the possibility of potential loans, noted: “We’re not making any decision today whether they will be forgiven or…won’t be forgiven.” Eric LeCompte, executive director of Jubilee USA, a non-profit devoted to the forgiveness of debt on humanitarian grounds, believes the priority should be to provide assistance for rebuilding as rapidly as possible, noting: “Almost six months after Hurricane Maria, we are still dealing with real human and economic suffering…It seems everyone is trying to work together to get the first installment of financing sent and it needs to be urgently sent.”

Part of the problem—and certainly part of the hope—is that President Dudley might be able to lend his acumen and experience to help. While the Treasury appears to be most concerned about greater Puerto Rico public budget transparency, Mr. Dudley, on the ground there, is more concerned that Puerto Rican leaders not misinterpret the economic boost from reconstruction following the devastating hurricanes as a sign of underlying strength, noting: “It’s really important not to be seduced by that strong recovery in the immediate aftermath of the disaster: We would expect there to be a bounce in 2018 as the construction activity gets underway in earnest,” before the economic growth slows again in 2019 or 2020, adding, ergo, that it was “important not to misinterpret what it means, because a lot still needs to be done on the fiscal side and the long-term economic development side.”


Municipal Fiscal & Professional Erosion in Puerto Rico

February 20, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the municipal fiscal threats to Puerto Rico’s municipios or municipalities, before turning to the continuing threats to the island’s future of its “brain drain” through the emigration of an increasing number of some of the island’s young professionals.

Severe Revenue Erosion. Since the last revenue quarter, Puerto Rico’s 78 municipios—cities and towns governed under Puerto Rico’s Autonomous Municipalities Act of 1991, which establishes that every municipality (those with populations in excess of 50,000 are designated as incorporated—those with less as incorporated towns: cities provision their own services, while towns typically depend on nearby cities for certain services) and must have a strong mayor form of government with a municipal legislature. All have experienced a consistent undermining of revenues: according to the most recent estimates, that includes a reduction of $56 million which will be reflected this fiscal year relating to the payment of movable and immovable property taxes, with the increasing losses related to business closures and the mass exodus of Puerto Ricans to the mainland, even as the capital and operating costs imposed in the wake of Hurricane Maria have left, in their wake, a fiscal hurricane of their own with, likely, long-term fiscal consequences. Some estimate that the losses related to property taxes have been as much as $55 million just in the last fiscal quarter, according to Javier Carrasquillo, President of the Governing Board of the Municipal Revenue Collection Center (CRIM), and the current Mayor of Cidra, a municipio known as La Ciudad de la Eterna, or the City of Eternal Spring.

CRIM is itself governed by a board composed of the President of GDB, the Commissioner of Municipal Affairs, and seven mayors of municipios: those elected mayors hold office for a term of four years (and not more than two consecutive terms) and until their successors have been appointed. CRIM’s principal offices are located at State Road 1, Km. 17.2, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00926. In addition, CRIM operates nine regional centers located in the municipalities of Aguadilla, Arecibo, Bayamón, Caguas, Carolina, Humacao, Mayagüez, Ponce, and San Juan.

CRIM estimated revenues for this fiscal year at $827,148,824 after the discount of the municipal Special Additional Contributions funds for the repayment of municipalities debts and the 5% for CRIM operational expenses. (Revenues of the municipalities of Puerto Rico are principally derived from ad valorem property taxes and Commonwealth contributions: Act No. 83 authorizes municipalities to impose the following property taxes: the Special Additional Tax, without limitation as to rate or amount, which as mentioned above is available primarily for the payment of a municipality’s general obligation debt; and a basic property tax to fund operating expenses up to a maximum amount of 6% of the assessed valuation on all real property within such municipality and up to a maximum amount of 4% of the assessed valuation on all personal property within such municipality (collectively, the “Basic Tax”)). Act No. 83 also continued in effect a special property tax imposed by the government of 1.03% of the assessed valuation of all real and personal property within Puerto Rico (other than exempted property) (the “Special Tax”) for the exclusive purpose of servicing the government’s general obligation debt. A portion of the Basic Tax levied by a municipality may be transferred to other municipalities by virtue of the operation of the Matching Fund.) In addition, under Act No. 64, each municipality is required to levy the Special Additional Tax in such amounts as shall be required for the payment of its general obligation municipal bonds and notes; principal of and interest on all general obligation municipal bonds and notes and on all municipal notes issued in anticipation of the issuance of general obligation bonds also constitute a first lien on the municipality’s Basic Tax. Accordingly, the municipality’s Basic Tax would be available to make debt service payments on general obligation municipal bonds and notes to the extent that the Special Additional Tax, together with moneys on deposit in the municipality’s Redemption Fund, are not sufficient to cover such debt service. Similarly, Act No. 83 provides for an exemption from the Special Additional Tax and Basic Tax on the first $15,000 of assessed valuation of primary personal residences of individuals (the so-called “$15,000 Real Property Exemption”) and an exemption from personal property taxes on the first $50,000 of assessed valuation of property owned by businesses that have gross revenues of less than $150,000 per annum (the “$50,000 Personal Property Exemption”). Recognizing the importance of the real and personal property tax for the fiscal requirements of the municipalities, the government makes annual appropriations to the municipalities from its General Fund as compensation for the amount of the revenues foregone owing to these exemptions. However, under Act No. 83, such appropriations will not be provided to cover any amount of property taxes, which any municipality elects to forgive for primary personal residences registered for the first time after January 1, 1992, and personal property of certain businesses registered for the first time after July 1, 1991.

Acts 83 and 80, which the Legislature approved in 1991, also provide for the following central government contributions to the municipalities: 2.50% of the net internal revenues of the General Fund for fiscal year 2004-2005 and thereafter; 35% of the annual net revenues derived from the operation of the additional lottery system created by Act No. 10, of the Legislature of Puerto Rico (approved in 1989). There are also so-called “Designated Commonwealth Contributions,” which provide an annual amount from the central governments’s General Fund to compensate the municipalities for the $15,000 Real Property Exemption and the $50,000 Personal Property Exemption; and an annual amount from the Commonwealth’s General Fund to compensate the municipalities for the exemption of 0.20% of the assessed valuation of all taxable property within the municipalities (the amounts in the clauses, with the exception of the annual contributions from the Commonwealth as compensation to the municipalities for the Special Additional Tax portions of the $15,000 Real Property Exemption and the $50,000 Personal Property Exemption (defined as the “Commonwealth Contributions”). Act 80, for its part, established the Municipal Matching Fund, into which CRIM is required to deposit with GDB the total amount collected on account of Basic Taxes and the Commonwealth Contributions. Certain funds in the Matching Fund (the “Equalization Moneys”) are available to CRIM in order to guaranty that each municipality will receive revenues in an amount at least equivalent to that received from Equalization Moneys in the previous fiscal year. The Equalization Moneys are comprised of: the Designated Commonwealth Contributions; and a portion of the Basic Tax equal to 1% of the assessed value of personal property and 3% of the assessed value of real property collected by each municipality (the “Designated Basic Tax”)—with all All Equalization funds distributed to the municipalities as follows: first, as may be required so that each municipality receives at least the same amount of aggregate revenues received during the previous fiscal year on account of Equalization Moneys, using first the Designated Commonwealth Contributions, and then, to the extent necessary, the Designated Basic Tax (it has never been necessary to use the Designated Basic Tax to perform such equalization); second, Designated Basic Taxes remaining in the Equalization Moneys are allocated to the municipalities in proportion to the amount by which revenues from their Basic Taxes in such fiscal year exceed their revenues from Basic Taxes in the previous fiscal year; and third, to all municipalities based on certain economic and demographic criteria specified in Act No. 80. The remaining Matching Fund moneys are returned to the municipalities whose Basic Tax levies gave rise to such remaining moneys, and are used, with their other revenues, to meet operating expenses. (Prior to July 1, 1993, the Secretary of the Treasury collected all municipal taxes upon real and personal property, including intangible property) in each municipality; since July 1, 1993, and pursuant to Act No. 80, CRIM has undertaken all of the Secretary of the Treasury’s responsibilities relating to the collection and distribution of such taxes. CRIM is responsible for the appraisal, assessment, notice of imposition, and collection of all municipal property taxes. All property taxes collected by CRIM are deposited at GDB, which acts as fiscal agent to the government and its municipalities. Real property is assessed by CRIM and personal property is self-assessed. These assessment values have not been adjusted to reflect the various applicable real property and personal property exemptions, such as those described under Municipal Revenues above and other exemptions granted under Puerto Rico tax incentives laws. As mentioned above, no real property reassessment has been made in Puerto Rico since 1958. All real property taxes are assessed on the basis of the replacement cost of the related real property in fiscal year 1957-58 values, regardless of when such property was constructed.

Unsheltered from the Storm. For some municipios, the cut in their remittances in the wake of Hurricane Maria reached as much as $6 million, as is the case of San Juan; however, in percentage terms, the most affected were Guayanilla and Manatí, with a reduction of 11.7% and 11.4%, respectively—meaning those municipios were forced to make signal fiscal adjustments even as expenses were swiftly rising. Indeed, as Mr. Carrasquillo had already warned, there would be a $30 million reduction from lotteries, even as collections between July and December were projected to be down by 15%. And even that amount has been assessed as only a start: In addition to the $ 56 million, municipios will have to deduct the money they have stopped receiving due to the elimination of the Sales and Use Tax on processed foods approved by the government in the wake of Hurricane Maria—as well as the exemption of the SUT collection for small businesses, with sales volumes for less than a million dollars, which was applied between November 20 and December 31. (Usually that 1% of SUT goes to municipalities to be used for essential services, such as garbage collection.) Mr. Carrasquillo said that the impact of the SUT exemption will not be measurable until they receive the Municipal Finance Corporation report; nor will the reduction which municipalities will have in their public coffers from the licenses payment: “Businesses file the license form once the economic activity year passed, so that will not be defined until January of 2019. We can only speculate now,” he added—with his own municipio having experienced the closure of some 123 businesses in the wake of the storm.

The current budget of Caguas, a municipio of about 142,000, is $ 92 million, an amount which reflects a reduction of $26,000 in the wake of rental space declines, as well as business related income losses and a court loss after an anticipated gain from a municipal initiative imposed on businesses which generated more than $3 million annually was struck down by the courts. In the municipio, some 25% of the nearly 5,000 shops remain closed, meaning, as the Mayor worries: “I cannot guarantee essential services for the population if the funds we need do not come.” The president of the Mayors Federation, Carlos Molina, estimated the direct impact in his municipality, Arecibo, to be $5 million, including the 20% in CRIM reduction. Thus, he reflects, municipios have no choice but to reduce operational expenses and establish consortiums to provide services to achieve lower costs: “We have to be realistic about how the island lives today, but we have to look for options and not wait for a miracle to happen.”

Mayor Rolando Ortiz of Cayey adds that the urgency of the municipalities is no longer limited to furloughs, but to shutdowns and closings: “There is no way out, because the municipal institution is misunderstood by the Governor. They see how effective we were before, during and after the hurricane, but now, when apparently that crisis has already passed and we say ‘we want to help,’ they are not there.” In his city, the CRIM reduction will be $700,000: “When they reduce money for municipalities, they are taking money from the most needy people of the island. Poverty is increasing.” But hope for a turnaround, in the wake of the PROMESA Board’s non-certification of Senate Bill 774 which would create a $100 million Municipal Recovery Fund, has been dashed.

Undercutting Hopes for a Recovery from the Storm. In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, Florida Hospital, which operates 26 hospitals throughout the Gator state, the hospital has recruited as many as 45 health care professionals from Puerto Rico, including nurses, medical technologists, and nutrition specialists. With a mainland nursing shortage and an aging U.S. population, which is fueling demand for health care services, estimates are that the U.S. will need to produce over one million new registered nurses by 2022 to fill newly created jobs and replace a legion of soon-to-be retirees, meaning, that Florida, the premier retiree state in the nation, commenced an international recruitment program for nurses a decade ago, but, in recent years, has looked increasingly at Puerto as one of its most promising pipelines for talent. Prior to Hurricane Maria, about 3% of Florida Hospital’s nurses came from Puerto Rico as a growing number of its residents migrated to the U.S. to escape the economic problems plaguing the island; however, that percentage is expected to double; in fact, Florida Hospital has even developed an outreach program, partnering with community groups to find and help healthcare professionals from Puerto Rico find jobs. The hospital also fast tracks the hiring process: interviews, applications, as well as getting the state requirements for nursing are all expedited. In nearby Missouri, CoxHealth, a nonprofit regional healthcare system operating six hospitals and 80 clinics, initiated a nurse recruitment effort in Puerto Rico last spring, describing recruitment as an easier option compared to other countries because of work visa, language, and other issues. For nursing professionals from Puerto Rico, where pay can be $14.15 an hour, long shifts, and attending to as many as 15 patients at a time because of hospital was understaffing, the move to Florida would seem almost a no-brainer: the pay in Florida is $25.71 per hour—and the case load far lower. Mary Perrone, the international recruiter for Florida Hospital, said 20 more nurses from Puerto Rico will finish training and be on staff in the coming weeks; CoxHealth sent a recruiting team to Puerto Rico last weekend for on-site interviews with nursing candidates. If all goes well, it hopes to hire 30 more nurses soon.

A Valentine’s Day Message?

St. Valentine’s Day, 2018

Good Morning! In today’s Blog, we consider the continued scrutiny by the PROMESA Board and Puerto Rico’s progress in not just recovering from Hurricane Maria—but also from its quasi chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy. That progress has been achieved through federal assistance, the Board’s vigorous oversight, and, as we note, tax and spending changes undertaken by the government of Puerto Rico.  

Fiscal Imbalances.  While states, cities, and counties operate in regular order, the federal shutdown, far into the federal fiscal year, illustrated the challenge to state and local governments of the unpredictability of federal funding that state and local governments would otherwise count upon. Now, in the wake of Congress’ vote to suspend the national debt ceiling, the package included nearly $100 billion in disaster aid, as well as extend a number of expired tax provisions, including a Jan. 1, 2022 extension of the rum cover-over for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands—an extension projected to generate an estimated $900 million for the two U.S. territories, as well as a related tax provision which would, at long last, allow low-income Puerto Rican muncipios to be treated as qualified opportunity zones: that disaster aid includes $4.9 billion to provide 100% federal funding for Medicaid health services for low-income residents of Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands for two years and $11 billion of Community Development Block Grants for the two territories, including $2 billion of CDBG money to rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid. Puerto Rico anticipates it will be the recipient of as much as $18 billion—with an option to access a line of credit of as much as $4 billion—albeit, to the extent the territory can continue to demonstrate its lack of liquidity. Those amounts, including $4.8 billion in Medicaid, and $11 billion from HUD, however, are subject to conditions of both the federal government and the PROMESA Board. HUD Deputy Secretary Pamela Hughes Patenaude last week stated HUD would award $1.5 billion to assist in the repair of damaged homes and business structure, while FEMA has already awarded $300 million, half of which is via a loan. In addition, the aid includes $14 million in the Women, Infants & Children (WIC) program assistance. The package provides some $14 million for the Army Corps of Engineers to award contracts to U.S. electric companies to repair the power grid. Importantly, the FEMA funding will provide not just for improvements in the island’s public power system, but also for repairs: Puerto Rico has guestimated it will require $ 94.4 billion to rebuild the island’s public infrastructure.

Puerto Rico’s non-voting Representative in Congress, Jenniffer González, noted the next disaster relief resolution may be discussed in Congress later this Spring—at which point she anticipates the critical focus Will be on Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. She noted: “Speaker Paul Ryan told me that there is going to be a fourth bill on supplementary allocations for Puerto Rico with specific projects for transportation and electric power.” U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) noted that claims of states such as Florida and Texas were very helpful in recent efforts in favor of funds for Puerto Rico; however, he warned that Congress needs to allocate additional funds for disasters regularly: “There are other places that, by then, will have needs.”

Negocios. Meanwhile, with regard to the fiscal storm, the fiscal amendments Governor Ricardo Rosselló presented to the PROMESA this week presented a more positive outlook for creditors to reach an accumulated surplus of $3,400 million, even as his offer retained virtually unchanged the terms of fiscal measures and severe cuts in government revenues over the next 5 fiscal years. The plan the Governor presented, moreover, did not comply with the requirements to reduce the pensions of government retirees, nor to eliminate additional labor protections for private sector workers, after the notification of violation of the federal PROMESA law—demands calling for a series of amendments, including a 25% reduction in pensions exceeding $1,000 per month (in combination with social insurance), in addition to the elimination of a series of protections for private sector employees. Indeed, in an interview with El Vocero, Gov. Rosselló replied that his administration is neither contemplating reductions to pensions nor including legislation to eliminate the employer’s obligation to pay the Christmas bonus and compensation for unjustified dismissal or to reduce the requirements for vacation leave and sick leave, stating: “We are not contemplating reductions in pensions.” As for eliminating labor protections, the Governor made clear: “We have not included that in the reform of human capital… certainly, it is an area that is important for us to work: how do we raise labor participation in Puerto Rico? How do we encourage them to transition to work? “

The most dramatic modification of the tax plan proposed by Gov. Rossello is the elimination of the aggregate deficit of $3,400 million for the FY2022 budget, since the previous version of its fiscal plan was in default with the objective of eliminating structural deficits: as early as FY2019, he projects the government will achieve a surplus of $750 million, thanks in large part, according to the Governor, to the federal assistance provided by Congress. Even though it had been estimated that the aid to date has reached $16.5 million, Puerto Rican authorities assert only $12,800 million has been incorporated as a result of supplementary allocations in the fiscal plan—allocations related to the FEMA $ 35.3 billion in the public assistance program and $21 billion in private insurance. The Governor noted his administration plans to spend $13 million of disaster recovery funds for Hurricane Maria, enabling, he added, a GDP growth projection of 8.4%. He also noted he expects a reduction in the rate of emigration from Puerto Rico down to 2.4%.

Unsurprisingly, he warned, the most difficult challenge will be what he termed the FY2020 Medicaid fiscal cliff –the year when the current Congressional appropriated funds will be exhausted. To address that abyss, he said the government has intensified cuts to government programs, as well as adopted measures to increase revenues, resulting, he asserted, in a positive or surplus balance of $800 million for FY 2023, noting: “Stabilization (the surplus) continues with other structural measures and impacts that have: the reduction in expenditures by government items and the rightsizing (shrinking) that is being done.” It appears that the $800 million projected surplus was included in the analysis of the sustainability of the public debt, an element which will be considered by the PROMESA quasi-bankruptcy court for the payment arrangement to the creditors—or, as he put it: “The discussion with the creditors will go by Title III, in everything that has not been agreed by Title VI. It is a numerical exercise, without differentiating creditors, about the numbers that reflect the fiscal plan, and that will certainly be part of the elements of judgment…that the judge would use in her determinations.”

The Governor noted that cuts to agencies such as Education, Corrections, Health, as well as across the board via shrinking services and utilizing tighter payroll control have succeeded in increasing revenues by $29 million; nevertheless, he added, because the new revenues failed to meet the anticipated goals, the agency, Mi Salud, will continue to be required to face an FY2022 reduction of some $795.

Fiscal & Physical Imbalances

Lincoln’s Birthday, February 12, 2018

Good Morning! In today’s Blog, we consider the outcome of last week’s actions to avoid another federal government shutdown, we consider the ongoing fiscal and physical plights of Puerto Rico.

Fiscal & Physical Imbalances.  Puerto Rico’s non-voting Member of Congress, Jenniffer Gonzalez, and Gov. Ricardo Rosselló have met with a group of New Progressive Mayors to describe the terms of the new federal assistance under the just passed $16 billion recovery assistance approved by Congress—funds ranging from what Secretary of Public Affairs Ramón Rosario Cortés noted would “range from construction to agriculture programs that will allow each municipality to develop its economy and create jobs.” The Secretary anticipates there will be a second meeting with associate mayors. Naguabo Mayor Noé Marcano said that the allocation of these funds represents “a unique opportunity” to repair and/or build infrastructure projects (including roads and bridges) and housing: “Part of the projects that we-at a given moment-had planned as improvements to the municipalities, we understand that this is the best opportunity.”

That could mean a new fiscal chance for this small muncipio of just over 23,000, one founded on July 15, 1821 near the mouth of the Daguao River—founded with the intent of providing a defense for the region from the Caribe Indians, based upon, 27 years earlier, the request of several influential neighbors of the Spanish Crown: on January 9, 1798, the erection of the Naguabo parish was authorized—but construction did not commence on its church until 1841. The muncipio’s name originated from the cacique and chieftainship named Daguao—as the territory was originally populated by Taíno Indians. Naguabo is also known as Cuna de Grandes Artistas (the birthplace of Great Artists) and Los Enchumbaos, “the Soaked Ones.”

For his part, Mayor William Aliceo of Aibonito, the City of Flowers, with the city’s appellation derived from the Taíno word “Jatibonicu,” the name of a Cacique leader of the region; a name also used to refer to a river in the area—and, in addition, a name used by the tribe of Orocobix. At the same time, there is a legend that tells of a Spanish soldier, Diego Alvarez, who, on May 17, 1615, reached one of the highest peaks in the area: upon taking in the view, he exclaimed: “Ay, que bonito!” The exclamation eventually led to the name of the region. Nearly two centuries later, Pedro Zorascoechea, in 1630, was one of the early Spaniards to settle on the island—apparently establishing one of the first fincas or ranches in the region; however, it was not until 1822, when Don Manuel Veléz presented himself before the government, representing the inhabitants of the area, to request that Aibonito be officially declared a town—a request which then Governor Miguel de la Torre granted on March 13, 1824.

Hurricane Maria’s eye tore through the region’s hills on September 20th: it was especially fierce along the exposed ridgelines, whipping in at a hundred and fifty-five miles an hour: it tore apart wooden houses; along the road leading up to Aibonito from San Juan, normally a two-hour drive, Maria tore a panorama of ruined houses and businesses, toppled and twisted trees, and downed utility poles. Mayor Aliceo said he would like to use part of the recovery funds for agriculture, roads, and electrical infrastructure: “In Aibonito, we have a project submitted to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the canalization of the Aibonito River. And with poultry farming, which was well affected by Hurricane Maria, I’m interested (the funds) will find a way to help Aibonito’s poultry farmers, given the million-dollar losses they’ve had.”

The federal allocation came just prior to Puerto Rico’s resubmission of its revised fiscal plans to the PROMESA oversight Board—plans due today, with Puerto Rico’s representative, Christian Sobrino, simply advising the board that the plans comply with the public policy of the government, noting: “[W]e will comply with the stipulated date for the delivery of the fiscal plans. It has been an intense job, but the government will comply with the appointed time. The plans will continue in accordance with the Governor’s public policy of protecting the most vulnerable and that this document serves as a tool of fiscal responsibility and at the same time a path of long-term socio-economic development for the island.”

Nevertheless, uncertainty reigns, especially in the wake of the federal government shutdown. With last week’s Congressional approval of a package to keeps federal agencies running through March 23rd, the date of certainty has now been pushed off while House and Senate appropriators in Washington, D.C. work on final 2018 spending bills. The package suspends the debt ceiling through March 1, 2019, provides $89.3 billion in disaster aid, and extends a number of expired tax provisions, including a Jan. 1, 2022 extension of the rum cover-over for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, which is projected to generate an estimated $900 million for the two U.S. territories. In addition, a related tax provision calls for all low-income communities in Puerto Rico to be treated as qualified opportunity zones. The disaster aid includes $4.9 billion to provide 100% federal funding for Medicaid health services for low-income residents of Puerto Rico and  the U.S. Virgin Islands for two years, $11 billion in CDBG block grants for the two territories, including $2 billion of CDBG money to rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid—with Resident Commissioner Gonzalez reporting that, in total, $16.55 billion of the disaster aid is earmarked for Puerto Rico.

With the new allocations to mitigate last year’s natural disasters, the federal government has already authorized just over $140.7 billion within the past six months to be distributed mainly between Texas, Florida, California, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands—with Puerto Rico’s government projecting its share will be approximately $18 billion, plus access to a credit line of $4 billion—albeit, to access that line, the U.S. territory would be mandated to prove lack of liquidity. Of the total, almost $16 billion will surely go to the island from the funds allocated in the budget bill and to mitigate disasters—provided the territory complies with the conditions of both the federal government and the PROMESA Oversight Board. The projected package includes $4.8 billion for Medicaid and $11 billion for CDBG: last week, HUD Deputy Secretary Pamela Hughes Patenaude announced, during a visit to San Juan, that HUD will award $1.5 billion to help repair damaged houses and businesses. In addition, another $ 300 million, half of which would be allocated as a loan, has been allocated to match the FEMA project’s cost. The package includes $6 billion, funds under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, provided to U.S. electric companies to repair the power grid. FEMA has stated, moreover, its intent to grant an additional $13 billion to the island.

Puerto Rico’s Federal Affairs Executive Director, Carlos Mercador, notes that an official damage estimate from federal agencies is still pending; Commissioner González notes that Congress’ next disasters relief resolution may be discussed in Congress between April and May, noting: “Speaker Paul Ryan told me that there is going to be a fourth bill on supplementary allocations for Puerto Rico, with specific projects for transportation and electric power.”

Puerto Rico’s Migratory Challenges

January 30, 2017

Good Morning! In today’s Blog, we consider the migratory challenges to Puerto Rico’s fiscal recovery.

Post Storm Fiscal & Physical Misery. Puerto Rico’s legislature has passed and sent legislation to Gov. Ricardo Rosselló for his signature to authorize the U.S. territory to lend capital to the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) and the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority to handle imminent cash shortfalls (as of February last year, PREPA had $9 billion of debt and PRASA had $4.6 billion of debt). The intent is to avert any potential financing outage next month—an outage of further apprehension because of the efforts on the mainland to lure Puerto Ricans for employment opportunities on the mainland: the South Carolina Department of Corrections, seeking to fill 650 vacant positions, has erected billboard ads in Puerto Rico offering relocation assistance and salaries as much as $35,000 annually—plus overtime and benefits. Another company, Bayada Home Health Care, has been advertising available positions on Facebook: the company reports the response has been so strong that it had to take down its ads. Given an unemployment rate, according to the U.S. Labor Department, rising over 10 percent at the end of last calendar year in Puerto Rico compared to the mainland, where the unemployment rate was falling below 5 percent, the allure of emigrating is understandable.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s latest American Community Survey—even though outdated in the wake of post-Hurricane Maria migration, approximately 320,000 Puerto Ricans live in central Florida, with a significant percentage arriving recently: the post-Maria migration could mean an outflow of an additional 114,000 to 213,000 each year for the next two years, according to the to the Center for Puerto Rican Studies in New York City, whose researchers from the Climate Impact Lab estimated the impact of Hurricane Maria, using an econometric model of the costs of cyclones over the past 60 years and applied it to the pre-storm economic conditions in Puerto Rico: “Maria could lower Puerto Rican incomes by 21 percent over the next 15 years—a cumulative $180 billion in lost economic output,” concluding that “Maria could be as economically costly as the 1997 Asian financial crisis was to Indonesia and Thailand and more than twice as damaging as the 1994 Peso Crisis was to Mexico—but this time on American soil.”

The allure of emigrating is demonstrated by estimates from the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, which has estimated that in the period from 2017 to next year as many as 470,335 Puerto Ricans will leave for the mainland—the equivalent of approximately 14 percent. More critically, however, those that are living appear, disproportionately, to be those who can afford to: the Center estimates “Maria could lower Puerto Rico incomes by 21 percent over the next 15 years,” an amount the equivalent to $180 billion in foregone economic output—leading the Center to write: “Hurricane Maria has accelerated this propensity to a point where we can refer to the depopulation of Puerto Rico as one of the most significant hurdles for future economic recovery.” The Center’s data makes clear, moreover, that it is the young and employable who are emigrating: overwhelmingly, it is the seniors who are being left behind—raising, unsurprisingly, increasing questions with regard to pension and health care implications as revenues will fall.

Fiscal Economic Dislocation?

January 22, 2017

Good Morning! In today’s Blog, we consider the ongoing federal and fiscal challenges to fiscal recovery for the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico.

‘Twas in another lifetime, one of toil and blood
When blackness was a virtue the road was full of mud
I came in from the wilderness, a creature void of form
Come in, she said
I’ll give ya shelter from the storm ∞ Bob Dylan

Modern Day Okies. Since Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, nearly 300,000 Puerto Ricans have left their homes and fled to Florida. These Americans have fled to other states too, with New York a key new home. The departures raise a host of fiscal challenges, including: for how much longer will FEMA assistance be available to these U.S. citizens? Are these Americans permanent departees from Puerto Rico? In addition, if so, are they predominantly younger, and higher income?

Under the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) program, FEMA has provided hotel or lodging assistance to evacuees; however, the duration of that assistance, which has just been extended until March under the FEMA Transitional Shelter Assistance program (not as form of temporary shelter while rebuilding her damaged home in Puerto Rico, remains uncertain: is it a way to relocate and start a new life on the mainland? In the beginning, most of those leaving were elderly, disabled, or in need of critical medical care. But that appears to have changed: today young Puerto Ricans appear to be the primary departees, threatening to compound what we have previously noted to be an historic, migratory wave in the wake of the U.S. territory’s physical and fiscal crisis: mayhap as many as 25 percent of the population will have departed by the end of the decade.

Ironically, especially given President Trump’s attitude towards Puerto Rico, including the disparate response to Puerto Rico compared to Houston and Florida, the disproportionately younger Puerto Ricans coming to the mainland have been sought after—often recruited. Last November, the agency offered to airlift victims of Hurricane Maria to the U.S. mainland to reach temporary housing–a first of its kind for the agency: under the program, the Transitional Shelter Assistance (TSA) program, displaced residents and families who are still living in shelters on Puerto Rico can opt to relocate to housing in Florida and New York. Mike Byrne, a federal coordinating officer for FEMA, said the program is the first time the agency has attempted what it calls an “air bridge,” or a relief operation requiring the transportation of individuals from a disaster area. In most disasters, FEMA pays displaced residents to stay in hotels under the TSA program. In Puerto Rico, the hotels are filled to capacity, so FEMA is turning to the mainland and working with states to find accommodations.

At the same time, because of anticipated labor shortages because of the White House anti-immigration policies, many domestic employers are eager to hire bilingual workers for whom the minimum wage of a U.S. state represents a significant boost in income compared to grim options on Puerto Rico. Likewise, both the federal and Puerto Rican governments have facilitated departures: that is, in the ongoing absence of an equitable or comprehensive recovery plan for Puerto Rico, migration has become a substitute for federal disaster relief and recovery: for the first time ever, FEMA created an “air bridge” and chartered cruise ships to evacuate residents. In the beginning, new arrivals were forced to seek shelter with family members or in homeless shelters; subsequently, such families are being offered hotel stays for up to three months. (Traditionally, FEMA offers temporary shelter to homeowners who have been adversely affected by a disaster while they carry out the arduous task of rebuilding; however, in the case of Hurricane Maria, the process of recovery has been severely undercut by the lack of electricity and running water, and the inability of the federal government to supply even the most basic materials.

The increasing challenge is that, as we have noted before, those Puerto Ricans fleeing destroyed homes, devastated public infrastructure, and a shattered economy, are, disproportionately, those who can afford to leave—and those whose jobs and livelihoods have been washed away. After all, some nearly four months after the hurricanes, many restaurants, stores and offices remain closed: how can one be competitive with operating on generators, operating with reduced personnel serving only FEMA workers, and with massive layoffs? Just last week, Walmart, Puerto Rico’s largest private employer, announced it was closing three of its Sam’s Club stores; pharmaceutical companies, which, today, account for nearly 50% of Puerto Rico’s manufacturing jobs, are rethinking their location in the wake of the implementation of the new federal tax reform law—a law which treats Puerto Rico as a foreign jurisdiction. The new tax law imposes a 12.5% tax on profits derived from intellectual property held in foreign jurisdictions. (The U.S. territory of Puerto Rico is a domestic jurisdiction in U.S. law—except for federal tax purposes.) The pre-existing tax law exempted Puerto Rico residents from paying federal income taxes, a provision which sought to attract investment in manufacturing, something which, prior to the hurricane, accounted for 47% of Puerto Rico’s gross domestic product—more than $48 billion, with the bulk of the incentives encouraging pharmaceuticals and medical devices that generate revenue from patented drugs and technologies.

However, the new federal tax changes were enacted to render offshore operations less profitable, thereby rewarding corporations which opt to relocate back to the U.S. mainland—because, the IRS considers Puerto Rico to be foreign, and because many of the most significant manufacturers on the island are foreign-owned.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the economic dislocation in Puerto Rico has led to mainland employers recognizing a diamond in the rough—meaning that they have been recruiting Puerto Rican workers to places such as Florida, North Carolina, Georgia, and Kansas: in Texas and Florida, developers hope that Puerto Rican labor will alleviate an expected shortage of construction workers as their own hurricane recovery gets underway. The efforts, piggy-backing on a trend that has accelerated over the last decade, has been focused on teachers, doctors, police officers, nurses, and engineers—exactly the positions most critical for Puerto Rico’s physical and fiscal recovery. But how to compete against Houston—a city where approximately one-third of schoolchildren are native Spanish speakers—and a city which received disproportionately greater federal hurricane assistance? The city’s school districts have already conducting multiple recruitment trips to Puerto Rico. Similarly, the police departments of Dallas, Charlotte, Baltimore, and even the nation’s capitol, Washington, D.C., have all turned to Puerto Rico as they have sought to diversify their departments with more Latino officers. In these instances, the recruiters lure workers with what appear to be high salaries when compared with the depressed incomes of a U.S. territory in physical and fiscal crisis.

Some have noted, moreover, that with the U.S. federal government closed, in no small part due to opposition to extending the DACA or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, it may be coincidental that the influx of Puerto Ricans to the mainland who were displaced by the storm coincides with the expiration of and, most recently, the end of temporary protected status for Central American and Caribbean migrants who had also fled natural disasters. That is, the combination furloughs, wage cuts, and higher prices for Puerto Rico’s working poor, combined with the massive damage to the island’s public infrastructure and disparate federal response, appears to have contributed to fueling a mass exodus—an exodus, however, of the young and qualified.

Governance Amidst Fiscal and Stormy Challenges & Uneven Federalism

December 1, 2017

Good Morning! In today’s Blog, we consider the fiscal and governing challenges in one of the nation’s oldest municipalities, and its remarkable turnaround from verging on becoming the first municipality in Virginia to file for chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, before veering south to assess what President Trump has described as the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico suffering from “from broken infrastructure and massive debt.” 

Visit the project blog: The Municipal Sustainability Project 

Revolutionary Municipality. Petersburg, Virginia’s City Council, one of the oldest of the nation’s cities, as part of its fiscal recovery, last week had voted 5-2 to request the Virginia Legislature to change the city’s charter in order to transfer the most critical duties of the Treasurer’s Office to a newly-created role of city collector—a position under the Council’s control, as part of its wish list for the newly elected state legislature. Petersburg, an independent city of just over 32,000, is significant for its role in African-American history: it is the site of one of the oldest free black settlements in the state–and the nation.  The unprecedented City Council effort seeks to strip power from an elected office—an office some believe curried some fault for contributing to Petersburg’s near chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy. Ironically, the effort came the same month that voters elected a former Member of the City Council to the office of Treasurer. Councilman Treska Wilson-Smith, who opposed the move, stated: “The citizens just voted in a Treasurer. For us to get rid of that position is a slap in the face to the citizens who put them in there.” Unsurprisingly, State Senator Rosalyn Dance, who for a dozen years has represented the city as part of her district in the Virginia House of Delegates, and who will consider the city’s legislative agenda, said she was concerned. Noting that the newly-elected treasurer has yet to serve a day in office, she added that much of the turmoil had to do with the current Treasurer, so, she said: “I hope [the] Council will take a second look at what they want to do.” Former Councilman and Treasurer-elect Kenneth Pritchett, who declined to comment, ran on a platform of improving the office’s operations by standardizing internal controls and implementing new policies: he urged Petersburg residents to contact lawmakers in a Facebook message posted after the Council took action, calling the decision “a prime example of total disrespect for the citizens’ vote.”

Nevertheless, Council Members who supported the legislative agenda language said it was time for a change, or, as Councilman Darrin Hill noted: “I respect the opinion of the citizens, but still, we believe if we keep on doing the same thing that we have done, then we will keep on getting the same results.” Other Councilmembers felt even better about their votes after the Council received good financial news earlier this week when newly audited reports showed a boost in Petersburg’s reserve funds, increased revenue, and a drop in expenditures—a marked fiscal reversal. In addition, the city’s external auditor provided a clean opinion—a step up from last year’s “modified” opinion—an opinion which had hinted the city had failed to comply with proper accounting principles—and a municipal fiscal year which commenced $19 million in the hole—and $12 million over budget—in response to which the Council raised taxes, cut more than $3 million in funding from the city’s chronically underperforming schools, eliminated a popular youth summer program, and closed cultural sites. Former Richmond City Manager Robert Bobb’s organization—which had been hired to help the city recoup from the verge of chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, had supported transferring some of the duties of the Treasurer to a city collector position as a means to enhance the city’s ability to improve its tax collections.

Subsequently, late last September, another shoe fell with a 115-page report which examined eight specific aspects of city governance—and found allegations of theft involving current Treasurer Kevin Brown—claims Mr. Brown repeatedly denied, but appeared to contribute to his decision not to run for reelection—an elected which Mr. Pritchett won by a wide margin, winning just over 70 percent.  Nevertheless, Mayor Samuel Parham told his colleagues: “We are treading too thin now to risk someone who is just getting to know the job. We can’t operate as a city of hoping…Now that we are paying our bills and showing growth, there is no need to go back in time and have a situation that we had.” However, some Councilmembers believe they should await more facts with regard to Mr. Brown’s actions, especially with regard to uncollected municipal tax revenues, or, as Councilmember Wilson-Smith put it: “There are some questions which we still have unanswered when it comes to why the taxes were not collected: It appears to me that a lot of the taxes are not being collected, because they are un-collectable,” or, as she noted: Many listed for unpaid taxes were deceased.

David Foley with Robinson, Farmer, Cox Associates, Petersburg’s external auditor, had presented figures before Petersburg residents and the City Council, noting the clean opinion is a substantial improvement from last year, when auditors issued a modified opinion which suggested Petersburg had failed to maintain accounting principles—testifying that the improvement mainly came from the city being able to provide evidence of the status of some of its major financial accounts, such as public utilities. He did recommend that Petersburg strengthen some of its internal controls over the next fiscal year—noting, especially, the reconciliation of the city’s public utility system, which some officials have suggested should be sold to private companies. Indeed, City Manager Aretha Ferrell-Benavides told City Council members that a plan to correct some of the deficiencies will start in January, with monthly updates on corrective actions that she would like to continue to take. The see-saw, key fiscal change of nearly $2 million more than had been projected arose from a combination of increased real estate tax collections, and a $2.5 million reduction in expenditures, mainly came from health and welfare, and non-departmental categories: in total, there was a $7.5 million increase in the city’s chief operating fund. Unsurprisingly, Mr. Foley, in response to Councilmember Charlie Cuthbert, noted: “It was a significant year. There is still a long way to go,” indirectly referencing the city’s commencement of FY2017 $19 million in the hole and $12 million over budget—and with dire threats of legal action over unpaid bills—triggering a tidal wave of legal bills of nearly $1 million—of which about $830,000 went to Mr. Bobb’s group—while the city spent nearly $200,000 on a forensic audit.  Council members received the presentation on the annual financial report with a scant two days prior to the state imposed deadline to submit the report—after, last year, the city was about seven months late in submitting its annual financial report.

Insufficient Shelter from the Fiscal Storm. In the brutal wake of Hurricane Maria, which destroyed about 57,000 homes in Puerto Rico last September and left another 254,000 severely impacted, 50 percent of the U.S. territory’s remaining 3.5 million inhabitants are still without electricity—a lack that has adversely impacted the ability to reconstruct the toll wrought by Maria, not to mention the economy, or loss of those, more than 150,000, who could afford to leave for New York and Florida. Puerto Rico still confronts a lack of drinking water. Governor Ricardo Rosselló had assured that 95% of the island would have electricity by today, but, like too many other promises, that is not to be. An irony is that the recent visit of former President Bill Clinton, who did not come down to toss paper towels, but rather to bring fiscal and physical assistance, may be, at long last, an omen of recovery. It was just 19 days ago that Gov. Roselló appeared before Congress to request some $94 billion to rebuild the U.S. territory—a request unmet, and a request raising questions about the Puerto Rican government’s ability to manage such a vast project, especially in the wake of the $300 million no-bid contract awarded to a small Montana utility company, Whitefish, to restore the territory’s power—an effort House Natural Resources Committee Chair Rob Bishop (R-Utah) described as raising a “credibility gap.” Indeed, in the wake of that decision, Chairman Bishop and others in the Congress have called for the unelected PROMESA Financial Oversight and Management Board, known on the island as “la junta,” to extend its powers to overseeing the rebuilding effort as well—a call which, unsurprisingly, many Puerto Ricans, including pro-statehood Governor Rosselló, see as a further threat to their democratic rights. 

Nevertheless, despite the quasi-takeover threat from Congress, U.S. District Court Judge Laura Taylor Swain has denied the PROMESA Oversight Board’s request to appoint an emergency manager, similar to those appointed by Gov. Rick Snyder in Detroit, or by the former Governor of Rhode Island for Central Falls under their respective authority under state authorizations of chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy. Puerto Rico, because it is not a state, does not have such authority; consequently, Judge Swain has determined the Board does not have the authority to appoint public officials—a holding which Gov. Rosselló responded to by noting that the decision upheld his office’s position about the board’s power, writing: “It is clear that the [board] does not have the power to take full control of the Government or its instrumentalities…[T]he administration and public management of Puerto Rico remains with the democratically elected government.