Motor City Rising

June 1, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the remarkable turnaround of Detroit—a city which, when I inquired on its very first day in chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, for walking directions from my hotel to the Governor’s Detroit office—in response to which I was told the one mile route was not doable—not because I would be too physically challenged,  but rather because I would be slain. Yet now, as the  fine editorial writers for the Detroit News, Daniel Howes and Nolan Finley, wrote: “A regional divide that appeared to be healing since Detroit’s historic bankruptcy is busting wide open over a plan for regional transit, exposing anxiety that the city is prospering at the expense of the suburbs,” noting that the trigger is a is a proposed millage to fund expansion of the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan, a $5.4 billion plan that would seem to promise an exceptional reshaping of the metro region—indeed: a reversal a what had been a decades-long shift of the economy from downtown Detroit to is suburbs: an exodus that contributed to a wasteland and the nation’s largest ever chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy.” Or, as they wrote: “That battle reveals growing suburban resentments over the region’s shifting economic fortunes: decades-long capital flow is reversing directions as more jobs and tax revenue flee the ‘burbs for a rejuvenated downtown.”

Mr. Finley noted that Mayor Mike Duggan, this week, told him: “I can’t explain why Oakland and Macomb (suburban counties) are doing what they’re doing” three weeks ago Microsoft brought 400 employees from Southfield into the city of Detroit. And last week, Tata Technologies said they were moving 200 people from Novi and into Detroit. Google is in the process of moving people from Birmingham into the city of Detroit.” What the Mayor was alluding to was a u-turn from a decade of moderate and upper income families leaving Detroit for its suburban counties in the days when former Mayor Coleman Young had advised criminals to “hit Eight Mile” has the relationship between the Metro Motor City’s regional leaders become so difficult in the wake of the unexpected reverse exodus: this time from Detroit’s suburbs back into the city. Billions in private sector investment, spearheaded by Dan Gilbert’s Quicken Loans Inc., the Ilitch family, and growing enthusiasm among other business leaders to be part of the city’s post-chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy have been changing demographic and economic patterns.

As the city continues under decreasing state oversight to carry out its judicially approved plan of debt adjustment, Mayor Duggan notes: “Expectations are rising.” This, after all, is not a City Hall bound mayor, but rather what the editors described as a “short, stocky, balding white guy who is no stranger to block after block of dilapidated houses—and who was reelected to a second term with an amazing 72% of the vote in a city where slightly more than 82% of the voters are black—and where, when he took office, there were about 40,000 abandoned homes. He is not a stay at City Hall type fellow either—rather an inveterate inspector of this mammoth rebuilding of an iconic city, who listens—and with his cell phone—takes action immediately in response to constituents concerns. After all, as the Mayor notes: “Expectations are rising…People are putting more demands on me and more demands on the administration, and I think that’s a really good thing and that will keep us motivated to work hard.”

Already, the urban wasteland is changing—almost on a daily basis: already, under a city program which supports renovation over demolition to try to preserve the mid-century architectural character of neighborhoods, that number of abandoned homes has been halved—with many of the units set aside for affordable housing. In his State of the City address this year, Mayor Duggan said he wants 8,000 more homes demolished, 2,000 sold, another 1,000 renovated and 11,000 more boarded up by the end of next year.

On that first day of the nation’s largest ever municipal bankruptcy, Kevin Orr, whom the Governor had tapped to become the Emergency Manager for Detroit, had flown out from the Washington, D.C. region, and told me his first actions were to email every employee of Detroit that he would be filing that morning in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, but that he expected every employee to report to work—and that the most critical priorities were that every traffic and street light work—and that there be a professional, courteous, and prompt response to every 911 call.  

That was a challenge—especially for a municipality in bankruptcy, but, by 2016, the city had completed a $185 million streetlight repair project; 911 response times have been reduced from 50 minutes in 2013 to 14.5 minutes last year, and ambulance response times fell from 20 minutes in 2014 to the national average of 8 minutes this year.

As we have previously noted, two months ago, just three and a half years after Detroit emerged from chapter 9, the city has exited from state oversight; its homeless population has, for the third consecutive year, declined—and, its unemployment rate, which had peaked during the fiscal crisis at 28%, is now below 8%. No wonder the suburbs are becoming fiscally jealous. And the downtown, which was unsafe for pedestrians when the National League of Cities hosted its annual meeting there in the 1980’s and on the city’s first day in bankruptcy, has been transformed into a modern, walkable metropolis.

Nevertheless, the seeming bulldog, relentless leader has refused to sugarcoat the fiscal and physical challenge—or, as he puts it: “I don’t spend a lot of time promising. I just say, here’s what we’re doing next and here’s why we’re doing it and then we do what we say…Over time, you don’t restore trust by making more promises; you restore trust by actually doing what you said you were going to do.”

Mr. Finley wrote that the Mayor, deemed a “truth teller” by Detroit Housing Director Arthur Jemison, has been direct in confronting the city’s harsh legacy of racist policies after the Great Depression lured thousands upon thousands of African-Americans north in the early decades of the 20th century to work in auto factories—luring them to a city at a time when Federal Housing Administration guidelines barred blacks in the city from obtaining home mortgages and even led to the construction in 1941 of a wall bordering the heavily African-American 8 Mile neighborhood to segregate it from a new housing development for whites.

Aaron Foley — the 33-year-old author of How to Live in Detroit Without Being a Jackass, noted: “When you deliver that kind of message about this is why black people are on this side of the wall in 8 Mile versus the other side of the wall, that gets people talking: This is a history that we all know in Detroit, and for the city government to acknowledge that in the way that it did on that platform, it did resonate.”

Mayor Duggan’s concern for Detroit’s people—and not forcing low-income families out, is evidenced too by his words: “Every single time that we had a building where the federal [housing] credits were expiring and people were going to get forced out of their affordable units, I had to sit down for hours with the building owner to convince them why those who stayed were entitled to be there, and I thought: I need to do just one speech and explain that this is the right thing to do…Since then there’s been just great support for the direction we’re going in the city. We have very little pushback now from our developers over making sure that what they’re doing is equitable.”

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The Motown Comeback

March 23, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the un-decaying of Detroit, as the Motor City takes steps to transform its future from its core out. Then we return to the frigid northern steppes of northern Michigan to assess the ongoing physical, fiscal, and governing challenges in Flint.

Pending City Council approval, Detroit will purchase 142 acres of the historic the historic Michigan State Fairgrounds, property which could become the home of a major employer, a regional transit hub, and a new focal point for the post-chapter 9 city’s vibrant fiscal recovery, with the decision coming after Michigan state officials give the city a green light. The Michigan Land Bank Fast Track Authority Board of Directors approved proposals Wednesday to sell the Detroit property where the Michigan State Fair was once held, as Mayor Mike Duggan, standing in front of the former site of the Michigan State Fair, which closed after more than century in 2009 stated: “Detroiters need jobs. There is no reason we can’t have 1,000 to 2,000 people working here.” Under the proposals, the city will purchase approximately 142 acres of the property for $7 million. Magic Plus plans to buy 16 acres, Detroit officials said the city will lead the redevelopment of the property with input from the community. Josh Burgett, the Michigan Land Bank Fast Track Authority’s director, said: “The historic State Fairgrounds is an important site for residents, the City of Detroit, and the entire region: All parties involved have worked hard to bring redevelopment to the site, and this public/private agreement is marrying two visions for the State Fairgrounds to create jobs and provide commercial destinations for those new employees and current residents.” If and when the City Council approves the proposed purchase, the City of Detroit will take ownership of the land this summer and Magic Plus will take ownership of its land in May. Joel Ferguson, principal of Magic Plus LLC, said his company will work with the city and area residents to determine the best use of the property. A number of uses have been suggested, such as a movie theater and restaurants, and Mr. Ferguson said he has a list of businesses interested in the site, stating: “(Residents) want a number of different stores that would service that immediate area. We don’t know what that will be. We’re working with the city and community, and they’ll highlight what they want us to do.” For his part, Mayor Duggan said he was confident the Council will approve the purchase, under which the city will pay an initial $3.5 million and another $3.5 million when the development is near completion, adding that he has been approached every day by employers who want to return to the city:  “I don’t see us going out for a (request for proposal) for housing or strip malls or anything like that: I see us talking to the major employers, looking at designing the land around regional transit and a major employment center. That’s what we hope to do.”

The purchase is the culmination of legislation Gov. Snyder signed into law nearly six years ago to allow for the transfer of the site to the Michigan Land Bank to be returned to productive use. Since then, the Land Bank has been working with Detroit and Magic Plus LLC to redevelop the site. St the same time, in what could be a related development, the Ford Motor Co. is reported to be pursuing a deal to purchase the abandoned Michigan  Central Station, a beautiful old building just outside of the historic downtown area–a station which has been abandoned and empty for nearly three decades–predating Detroit’s historic chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy. Crain’’s is reporting that the deal between Ford and the current owner, the Moroun family, could be announced as soon as next month–likely paving the way for Ford’s second recent investment in Detroit’s historic Corktown neighborhood, after, three months ago, Ford announced it would put 200 employees in The Factory, a building less than a half a mile from Michigan Central Station. A redeveloped train station could house 1,000 Ford employees. (The automobile company currently houses most of its employees in facilities around the Detroit suburb of Dearborn.) This would mark Ford’s second recent investment in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood, after, three months ago, the company had announced it would put 200 employees in The Factory, a building less than a half a mile from Michigan Central Station. A redeveloped train station could house 1,000 Ford workers. The deal could profoundly mark a vital step in the Motor City’s remarkable recovery from the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history–especially with the downtown core already experiencing a revival in business and culture–even as, to date, the surrounding neighborhoods have struggled to keep up. Indeed, the news of the redevelopment Corktown has ample room for new housing and businesses and redeveloping Michigan Central Station would throw the neighborhood the attention and money it needs to grow has reignited discussions about the future of Corktown, the consequences of having such a powerful company as an anchor in the community, and, most significantly, what possible bigger shifts are in store for property in the area. A search of available records, using Loveland Technologies mapping service, found that of the 86 properties closest to the old depot, nearly 20% are owned by the City of Detroit. Given the city’s history of working with developers to encourage construction, the surrounding area may undergo a range of infrastructure and aesthetic improvements. In addition to Roosevelt Park, which sits in front of the depot, the city owns four massive plots of land to the west of the train station, 10 small plots on 18th Street and one property on 17th Street. Jed Howbert, of Mayor Duggan’s Jobs and Economy Team, noted: “To state the obvious, we love all corporate investment in the city that creates jobs. So we’d be as enthusiastic about Ford as any other tenant looking at major  investments.” What remains to be fleshed out are how a community benefits agreement would shape any Ford agreement. To date, in the Motor City, only six projects have been subjected to the law — four of them Dan Gilbert initiatives. The end results, according to a new report from WDET, found that “after 12 weeks of community benefits talks with residents across the four projects, Bedrock committed to two community benefits in its agreements with the city. The first: Bedrock would communicate with residents about construction-related activity. And the second: Bedrock would support job training initiatives, something the company has been doing for years.”  Rashida Tlaib, a former Michigan state Representative who also is part of the Equitable Detroit Coalition, hopes that even without public funding, Ford would meet with the community. “I just hope there is an actual sit-down and agreement on whatever future development Ford Motor Co. would like to have there,” said Tlaib, adding that it was difficult to speak about the future as so much of the process has been obscured. “It’s unfortunate a lot of these deals are done behind closed doors and often the role of the city is much more prominent than they’re revealing to all of us,” she said. 

Out like Flint? Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt said that eradicating lead from drinking water is one of his top priorities three years after the Flint water crisis; however, he reported he was worried Americans are not “sufficiently aware” of the threat: “I really believe that we ought to set a goal as a country that, over the next 10 years, that we ought to work with respect to investments in our infrastructure to eradicate lead in our drinking water…It can be achieved. Some of the mental-acuity levels of our children are being impacted adversely as a result of this.” Administrator Pruitt is concerned that parents and citizens do not understand the threat of lead in drinking water or toys, noting the Administration is “looking at ways we can contribute to that dialogue: I do think that what happened in Flint is something that could happen elsewhere. We just simply need to take steps to do all that we can to address it prospectively and proactively,” adding that the White House proposal to bolster the nation’s infrastructure over the next decade would include investments in aging water infrastructure; however, that federally unfunded plan includes no provisions for replacing the thousands of lead service lines throughout the country–a cost estimated around $40 billion to $45 billion, even as it stresses the need for state and local governments to invest in such upgrades. Administrator Pruitt noted he would “love” to see local governments investing more in water infrastructure: “These water treatment facilities – they have authority to bond out, to raise fees, to invest in corrosion control, the replacement of service lines and the rest…And some of them just aren’t doing it.” The EPA Administrator was silent on the enormous fiscal disparities which so adversely affect fiscally stressed municipalities like Flint with vastly disproportionate levels of poverty. 

More constructively, Gov. Rick Snyder has proposed having water customers across Michigan pay a $5 annual fee to help upgrade aging infrastructure and replace lead pipes in their local communities. His proposal, however, has gained little traction in the Republican-controlled Legislature, while U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee (D-Flint Township) said what Administrator Pruitt has described was not really a plan: “When it comes to Mr. Pruitt, nice words don’t replace pipes. It takes money. What they have proposed is really nothing when it comes to infrastructure,” Rep. Kildee said of the Trump administration proposal. Rep. Kildee added that what would make a meaningful difference would be for EPA to support amending the nation’s Clean Water Act to reduce the acceptable amount of lead in drinking water to 5 parts per billion. (The current federal action limit is 15 parts per billion.) Rep. Kildee noted: “Force federal and state governments to stare this in the face by adopting a level that is science-based that says there is no acceptable level of lead.” EPA has spent a decade trying to update the rule—a rule which Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder called “dumb and dangerous” after the Flint disaster. The state has proposed draft rules to drop the acceptable amount of lead in drinking water to 10 parts per billion by 2024.

Five years ago a Center for American Progress report cited several school districts like Chicago, Philadelphia, Baltimore—not Detroit—as examples of places where mayoral governance of public schools has had some measure of success improving the achievement gap for students. “Governance constitutes a structural barrier to academic and management improvement in too many large urban districts, where turf battles and political squabbles involving school leaders and an array of stakeholders have for too long taken energy and focus away from the core mission of education,” the report stated. Consequently, the report added, “Mayoral accountability aims to address the governing challenges in urban districts by making a single office responsible for the performance the city’s public schools. Citywide priorities such as reducing the achievement gap receive more focused attention.” But the only problem is this belief about mayoral control of schools has not worked well for Detroit. It has done just the opposite since the 1999 state takeover of the schools under former Gov. John Engler, which allowed for the Mayor of Detroit to make some appointments to the school board. Since the state took over governance of the schools, when it was in a surplus, the district had been on a downward spiral with each year returning ballooning deficits under rotating state-appointed emergency managers. The District lost thousands of students to suburban schools as corruption and graft also became a hallmark of a system that took away resources that were meant to educate the city’s kids.

Such history is what informs the resistance to outside involvement with the new Detroit Public Schools Community District which is now under an elected board with Superintendent Nikolai Vitti. His leadership is being received as a breath of fresh air as he implements needed reforms. That is what is now fueling skepticism and reservation about Mayor Mike Duggan’s bus loop initiative to help stem the tide of some 30,000 Detroit students he says attend schools in the suburbs. During his State of the City address, Mayor Duggan cited transportation as critical to connecting both Detroit district and charter school students and ensuring that students succeed in the city. Many believe the Mayor is right that losing students to suburban districts is impacting the district and the urgent need to reverse or tackle this trend. It is also reasonable to expect the Mayor to be supportive of the school district—there is widespread recognition that the city will not be able to succeed fiscally over the long-term without a functioning school system that will act as an incentive to draw families back into the city.

“The district is ready to support the initiative, but we need to review additional information to justify cost,” Superintendent Vitti said in an email response to questions about the Mayor’s plan. “The information is related to knowing how many school age students live near the schools and are not attending DPSCD? What percentage is already using our provided transportation lines that attend the schools? If they are not attending schools, where are they attending?” Under the proposal, it would cost between $90,000-$150,000 to embark on the project involving six Detroit schools, according to Superintendent Vitti. But he said concern about outside interference with the school system is not misplaced: “The district has not been respected by outsiders for decades and children have suffered. This includes policies that have favored charter schools over traditional public schools,” Superintendent Vitti said. “As a district, we need to listen and reflect on the concerns that have been raised. In the end, if we move forward with the initiative, we need to ensure that it is in the best interest of the district.” Superintendent Vitti also said this was not about mayoral control of the schools: “I have no evidence or belief that the Mayor is interested in running schools…I honestly believe the Mayor’s intent is to recruit students back to the city.”

Chris White, a community activist who has watched the district evolve over the years, remains skeptical about anything involving the school district and the Mayor, noting: “I strongly feel the Mayor’s priority should be crime reduction: His responsibility is managing the city, and when you examine the state of Detroit, he definitely has not been responsible.” Mr. White said the district can get back those students they are losing to outside schools by “keeping them safe and making sure the district is a partner to the community. People need stability when it comes to their child’s education.” Superintendent Vitti asserts he is doing just that. And he said the new bus initiative would not take away resources from the district: “As you know, competition with charter schools is not going away and we need to compete. I believe that through a bus loop we can recruit students who live in the area and are attending schools outside of the district and even charter schools…We would only support a one-year pilot before extending to future years. This would be a lot easier if fully funded outside of district resources.”

Fair Investment in the Motor City’s Future? Pending City Council approval, Detroit will purchase 142 acres of the historic Michigan State Fairgrounds—property which could become the home of a major employer, a regional transit hub, and provide amenities to area residents after state officials gave the City of Detroit and Earvin “Magic” Johnson’s development company the go ahead to buy the property. The Michigan Land Bank Fast Track Authority Board of Directors Wednesday approved proposals for the sale of the Detroit property where the Michigan State Fair was once held to the city and Magic Plus LLC. Mayor Mike Duggan noted: “A property of this size should be a major employment center for Detroiters,” speaking in front of the coliseum, which shuttered its doors when the Michigan State Fair ended its 104-year run on the site in 2009. Mayor Duggan said: “Detroiters need jobs. There is no reason we can’t have 1,000 to 2,000 people working here.”

Under the proposals, the City will buy about 142 acres of the property for $7 million. Magic Plus plans to purchase 16 acres: officials said the City will lead the redevelopment of the property with input from the community. Michigan Land Bank Fast Track Authority Director Josh Burgett noted: “The historic State Fairgrounds is an important site for residents, the City of Detroit, and the entire region: All parties involved have worked hard to bring redevelopment to the site, and this public/private agreement is marrying two visions for the State Fairgrounds to create jobs and provide commercial destinations for those new employees and current residents.”

The proposed purchase requires approval by the Detroit City Council—which, provided it is given, would pave the way for the city to take ownership of the land this summer, while Magic Plus will take ownership of its land in May. Joel Ferguson, principal of Magic Plus LLC, said his company will work with the city and area residents to determine the best use of the property, with possibilities including a movie theater and restaurants. Mr. Ferguson reports he has a list of businesses interested in the site, noting: “There’s not going to be any housing from us for sure…(Residents) want a number of different stores that would service that immediate area. We don’t know what that will be. We’re working with the city and community, and they’ll highlight what they want us to do.”

Mayor Duggan reported he was confident the City Council will approve the purchase, under which the city will pay an initial $3.5 million, and another $3.5 million when the development is near completion, adding that he has been approached every day by employers who want to return to the city. He added: “I don’t see us going out for a (request for proposal) for housing or strip malls or anything like that: I see us talking to the major employers, looking at designing the land around regional transit and a major employment center. That’s what we hope to do.”

The development could not only revitalize a key downtown area where I had been informed it was too dangerous to even walk alone outside on the day Detroit filed for chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, but also, as Councilman Roy McAlister noted, become a metropolitan center due to the site’s proximity to Oakland and Macomb counties, so that, as the Councilmember put it: “We’re also bringing our region together to make sure that we’re prosperous.” The site was the locus for the Michigan State Fair from 1905 until 2009; then, six years ago, Gov. Rick Snyder signed legislation to permit the transfer of the site to the Michigan Land Bank to be returned to productive use. Since then, the Land Bank has been working with Detroit and Magic Plus LLC to redevelop the site.

Getting Back on Track. In a related development in the Motor City, there are reports that the Ford Motor Co. is pursuing a deal to purchase the abandoned Michigan Central Station, a massive, vacant structure located just outside downtown Detroit, which has been empty for about 30 years—an all too ominous emblem of the past decaying Motor City, with Crain’s reporting that the potential between Ford and the current owner, the Moroun family, could be announced as early as next month. If completed, this would mark Ford’s second recent investment in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood: three months ago, Ford announced it would put 200 employees in The Factory, a building less than a half a mile from Michigan Central Station. A redeveloped train station could house 1,000 Ford workers; currently, Ford houses most of its employees in facilities around the Detroit suburb of Dearborn. Corktown is a neighborhood just outside the downtown core of Detroit–Amtrak last used the station 30 years ago; today it is owned by the Moroun family, which spent more than $8 million on the building, installing more than 1,100 windows and adding a freight elevator. This new development could result in still another remarkable change for downtown Detroit, where the downtown core is already experiencing a revival in business and culture, but where the surrounding neighborhoods have, to date, largely been left out. But, Corktown, with its ample room for new housing and businesses, combined with the redeveloping Michigan Central Station, could well result in pulling the neighborhood to a much brighter future. Such a proposed agreement between Ford and the current owner, the Moroun family, could be announced as soon as next month. It would mark Ford’s second recent investment in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood, after, three months ago, Ford announced it would put 200 employees in The Factory, a building less than a half a mile from Michigan Central Station. A redeveloped train station could house 1,000 Ford workers. (Ford currently houses most of its employees in facilities around the Detroit suburb of Dearborn.) The possibility of the purchase of the long-vacant Michigan Central Station has reignited discussions about the future of Corktown, the consequences of having such a powerful company as an anchor in the community, and, most significantly, what possible bigger shifts are in store for property in the area. Currently, according to a search of available records, using Loveland Technologies mapping service, found that of the 86 properties closest to the depot, nearly 20%, or about 46 acres, are owned by the City of Detroit. Now, given the city’s history of working with developers to encourage construction, the surrounding area may undergo a range of infrastructure and aesthetic improvements. In addition to Roosevelt Park, which sits in front of the depot, the city owns four massive plots of land to the west of the train station, 10 small plots on 18th Street and one property on 17th Street. The Moroun family, which currently owns the train station, also owns two massive properties east and west of the old depot, and four smaller plots on 17th Street, next to the one owned by the city. Thus, unsurprisingly, Jed Howbert, a member of Mayor Mike Duggan’s Jobs and Economy Team told the Detroit Free Press: “To state the obvious, we love all corporate investment in the city that creates jobs. So we’d be as enthusiastic about Ford as any other tenant looking at major  investments.”

Out like Flint? Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt this week said that eradicating lead from drinking water is one of his top priorities, three years after the Flint water crisis, adding that he is worried Americans are not “sufficiently aware” of the threat, and adding: “I really believe that we ought to set a goal as a country that, over the next 10 years, that we ought to work with respect to investments in our infrastructure to eradicate lead in our drinking water: It can be achieved. Some of the mental-acuity levels of our children are being impacted adversely as a result of this.” Administrator Pruitt is concerned that parents and citizens do not understand the threat of lead in drinking water or toys, noting the Administration is “looking at ways we can contribute to that dialogue: I do think that what happened in Flint is something that could happen elsewhere. We just simply need to take steps to do all that we can to address it prospectively and proactively,” adding that the White House proposal to bolster the nation’s infrastructure over the next decade would include investments in aging water infrastructure; however, that federally unfunded plan includes no provisions for replacing the thousands of lead service lines throughout the country – a cost estimated around $40 billion to $45 billion, even as it stresses the need for state and local governments to invest in such upgrades. Administrator Pruitt noted he would “love” to see local governments investing more in water infrastructure: “These water treatment facilities – they have authority to bond out, to raise fees, to invest in corrosion control, the replacement of service lines and the rest…And some of them just aren’t doing it.”

Meanwhile, Gov. Rick Snyder has proposed having water customers across Michigan pay a $5 annual fee to help upgrade aging public infrastructure and replace lead pipes in their local communities; however, his plan has, so far, failed to gain much momentum in the Republican-controlled Legislature. U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee (D-Flint Township) noted that what Administrator Pruitt had described was not really a plan. “When it comes to Mr. Pruitt, nice words don’t replace pipes. It takes money. What they have proposed is really nothing when it comes to infrastructure.” Rather, Rep Kildee said would help would be Administration support for his proposed bill to reduce the acceptable amount of lead in drinking water to 5 parts per billion. (The current federal action limit is 15 parts per billion.) The Congressman noted: “Force federal and state governments to stare this in the face by adopting a level that is science-based, that says there is no acceptable level of lead.” EPA has spent a decade trying to update the rule—a rule which Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has called “dumb and dangerous” in the wake of the Flint disaster. The state has proposed draft rules to drop the acceptable amount of lead in drinking water to 10 parts per billion by 2024.