Breaking Up Is Hard to Do.

eBlog, 03/06/17

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the trials and tribulations of really emerging from the largest chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy in American history; then we turn to an alternative to municipal bankruptcy: dissolution.

The Hard Road of Exiting Municipal Bankruptcy: A Time of Fragility. Christopher Ilitch, the Chief Executive Officer of Ilitch Holdings Inc., companies in Detroit which represent leading brands in the food, sports, and entertainment industries (including Little Caesars, the Detroit Red Wings, the Detroit Tigers, Olympia Entertainment, Uptown Entertainment, Blue Line Foodservice Distribution, Champion Foods, Little Caesars Pizza Kit Fundraising Program, and Olympia Development), notes that “We are at a critical time in Detroit’s history,” speaking at the Detroit Regional Chamber’s Detroit Policy Conference: “There’s been no community that’s been through what Detroit has been through. Through the depths, there’s been a lot of choices.” Indeed, as the very fine editor of the Detroit News, Daniel Howeswrote: “There still is, and how they’re made could meaningfully impact Detroit’s arc of reinvention: despite a booming development scene spearheaded now by the Ilitch family’s $1.2 billion District Detroit, Quicken Loans Inc. Chairman Dan Gilbert’s empire-building, more effective policing and a burgeoning downtown scene, four words loom: “We’re not there yet.” Mr. Howes notes that the cost of new construction projects still cannot be fully recouped through commercial and residential rents, adding: “The business climate, including taxes and regulation, still is not as attractive as it could be. And longstanding residents in the city’s neighborhoods worry that the reinvention of downtown and Midtown risks leaving them behind.” Or, as Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones puts it: “We have been talking about downtown and Midtown so much, and we know downtown and Midtown are important…If we are going to subsidize development, we would like to see something in it for us as well.” That is, exiting chapter 9 bankruptcy is not a panacea: one’s city still confronts a steep hill to execute its plan of debt adjustment—and a hill the scaling of which comes at higher borrowing costs than other cities of the same size. That is to say, long-term recovery has to involve the entire community—not just the municipal government. Or, as Mr. Howes notes: “Business leaders stepped in to acquire new police cruisers and EMT trucks, even as some of them finance ‘secondary patrols’ of downtown districts. The moves by General Motors Co. and Gilbert’s Rock Ventures LLC, to name two, to employ off-duty Detroit police officers are supported by Detroit Police Chief James Craig…The partnership has been bipartisan and regional. It’s been public and private, city and suburb. It’s required Republicans to act less Republican and Democrats to act less Democratic. That’s not because either side is suddenly non-partisan, but because the long history of confrontation and suspicion chronically under-delivers.” But he adds the critical point: “[A]s the city moves into an election year, as the memories of recessionary hardship dim, as the construction and investment boom continues. None of it is guaranteed, including collaboration forged by leaders under difficult circumstances…If there’s any town in America that can make its virtuous circle become a vicious cycle, Detroit is it. Remembering what’s worked, what hasn’t, and how inclusion can improve the chances for success remains critical…It’s a tricky balance that depends most on leadership and transparency so long as the macro-economic environment remains positive. If there are two themes connecting the reinvention of Detroit with its present, they are that a) experts expect the building and redevelopment boom to continue and b) neighborhood concerns are real and should not be dismissed.” In Detroit, it turned out going into chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy—a slide enabled by criminal behavior of its Mayor, and the profound failure to make it a city on a hill—a city which would draw families and businesses—was easy. That means getting out—and staying out—is the opposite in this fragile time of recovery, or, as Moddie Turay, executive vice president of real estate and financial services at the Detroit Economic Growth Corp., notes: “There’s a ton that’s happening here. We’re just not there yet…We have another five or so years to go. We are at a fragile time — a great time in the city, but still a fragile time.”

Disappearville? Breaking Up Is Hard to Do. Mayor Margaret J. Nelms and her Council Members in Centerville, North Carolina have voted to dissolve the town’s charter and become unincorporated in the wake of voters’ rejection, in January, of an effort to raise property taxes. The municipality (town), founded in 1882, in the rural northeastern corner of Franklin County had a population of 89 as of the 2010 census, a ten percent decline from the previous census: this is a municipality without a post office or a zip code—or, now, a future. It was incorporated during the same time period as the dissolution of the nearby town of Wood in 1961, roughly 80 years after first settlement. Unlike elected officials of other Franklin County municipalities (as well as the county itself) which have four-year terms, in Centerville, the Mayor and its three-member Town Council are elected every two years. The city’s downtown consists of two small old-fashioned country stores—Arnold’s and The Country Store, with one also the local gas station. The City has its own volunteer fire department: there is no police department, so Centerville—like the surrounding unincorporated area—is patrolled by the Franklin County sheriff.

Sen. Chad Barefoot (R), whose district includes Centerville, the sponsor of the state legislation [Senate Bill DRS45094-LM-35 (02/16)] to dissolve the municipality, noted: “There are a lot of towns like Centerville in North Carolina…What they’re doing is pretty courageous. They’re acting like adults. It’s something very hard to do, but it’s very responsible.” His proposed bill, the Repeal Centerville Charter, will allow the dissolution of the town, except that the governing board of the Town of Centerville would be continued in office for days thereafter for the sole purpose of liquidating the assets and liabilities of the Town and filing any financial reports which may be required by law, with any remaining net assets to be paid over to the Centerville Fire Department, which would be directed to use those funds for some public purpose. (In Centerville, the main municipal services provided to residents are: streetlights in the town center; Centerville also pays for an annual audit and holds municipal elections, although only a dozen citizens voted in the most recent municipal election, in 2015.) Centerville will continue to exist as a community, but any local-government services will be provided by the county: any remaining municipal funds left over after the town is unincorporated will be donated to the local volunteer fire department, according to the legislation. Dissolution is a painful choice: Frank Albano, the owner of an antique store in Centerville, rued the city did not consider other fiscal options, such as charging businesses like his an $100 annual operating fee, or asked $5 per float in the New Year’s Day parade. He notes: “The more local the government is, the better.”

The decision to dissolve is, however, not new: it was nearly a century ago that Farrington Carpenter, a Harvard-educated rancher in Colorado, noted that—at the time—there were 20 counties in the Mile High state with populations under 5,000. Municipalities—and their voters—rarely agree to give up their identities, leading him to query: “How can such small counties afford the cost of a complete county government?”  On the other end of the country, in Pennsylvania, home to more municipalities than any state in the union, running the gamut from metropolitan cities to first, second, and third class townships, it has long been a vexing governance conundrum how such a governing model is sustainable. Indeed, James Brooks, my former colleague from when I workd at the National League of Cities, where he serves as Director of City Solutions, reports that according to NLC’s 2015 report examining the economic vitality of cities, the smallest cities have generally been slower to recover—or, as one commentator describes it: “They can’t solve their problems themselves…Wealth has left these little cities to such a degree that they’re basically bankrupt.”

Challenges in Rebounding from Insolvency or Municipal Bankruptcy

eBlog, 02/27/17

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider new development plans for the insolvent, state-taken over Atlantic City, before turning to the post-chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy electoral challenges in Detroit—where the son of a former Mayor is challenging the current Mayor—and where the post-bankrupt city is seeking to confront its exceptional public pension obligations in a city with an upside down population imbalance of retirees to taxpayers.

Spinning the Fiscal Turnstile in Atlantic City? Since New Jersey’s Casino Reinvestment Development Authority (CRDA) developed its Tourism District master plan for Atlantic City five years ago, five casino have closed—casinos with assessed values of $11 billion. Those closures appeared to be the key fiscal destabilizers which plunged the city into near municipal bankruptcy and a state takeover. Now the Authority, which handles redevelopment projects and zoning in the Tourism District (The rest of Atlantic City is under the city’s zoning jurisdiction—albeit a city today taken over by the state, and where the Development Authority was given authority by the state over the Tourism District in 2011) has approved spending $2 million for refurbishing. Robert Mulcahy, the Chairman of the authority’s board of directors, states: “The master plan is done to streamline zoning, help eliminate red tape, encourage proper development in the appropriate district, and stimulate investment in commercial, entertainment, housing, and mixed-use properties…This provides a vision to what we want to do.” The proposed land-use regulations’ twenty-five objectives include providing a zoning scheme to stimulate development and maintain public confidence in the casino gaming industry as a unique tool of the city’s urban redevelopment. The new zones would allow for mixed use near the waterfront, and retail development around the Atlantic City Expressway and its waterfront under the state agency blueprint intended to make it easier for companies to turn old industrial buildings into commercial and waterfront areas, to build amusement rides off the Boardwalk, maybe even incentivize craft brewers and distillers to open businesses.  

CRDA Director Lance Landgraf noted: “The city last changed the zoning along the Boardwalk when casinos came in.” Similarly, Atlantic City Mayor Don Guardian, who is a CRDA board member, noted: “If we talked 10 years ago about the Southeast Inlet, I think most people saw it as a Miami Beach with a bunch of high-rises that would go from Revel to Brigantine Inlet…Times have changed. People are now looking for mixed-use type of things, which is certainly what is important.” According to the proposed plan, the new tourism district would be intended to maximize recreational and entertainment opportunities, including the growing craft beer trend. Smaller breweries and distilleries have expressed interest in operating in the city, according to the draft plan, which notes it “seeks to reinvigorate the Atlantic City experience by enhancing the Boardwalk, beach and nearby streets through extensive entertainment and event programming; creating an improved street-level experience on major thoroughfares; offering new and dynamic retail offerings and increasing cleanliness and safety.”

Post Chapter 9 Leadership.  Coleman Young II, a state Senator in Michigan representing Detroit, sitting beneath a photograph of his late father and former Detroit Mayor Coleman Young, has officially launched his challenge against current Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, claiming the Motor City needs a leader who focuses on helping residents who are struggling with unemployment and other hardships, and criticizing Mayor Duggan for what he called a lack of attention to Detroit’s neighborhoods, noting: “We need change, and that is why I am running for mayor: I will do whatever it takes—blood, sweat, tears, and toil—and I will fight to the very end to make sure that justice is done for the City of Detroit…In announcing his challenge, Sen. Young recalled his father’s focus on jobs when he served as Detroit’s first black mayor: “I want to put people back to work just like my father, the honorable Coleman Alexander Young did…He is turning over in his grave right now!”

Interestingly, Sen. Young’s challenge came just days after last week’s formal State of the City address by Mayor Duggan—an address in which he focused on putting Detroiters to work and investing in neighborhoods—announcing a new city program, Detroit at Work, which is focused on training Detroit residents for available jobs—a speech which candidate Young, in his speech, deemed a “joke,” stating: “I think it’s kind of funny he waits for four years and now starts talking about the neighborhoods…As far as I’m concerned, he’s just somebody that’s in the way and needs to go. It’s time for change. It’s time for reform.” (Detroit’s primary will be in August; the election is Nov. 7th.)

Rebound? Whomever is elected next November in Detroit will confront lingering challenges from Detroit’s largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. That July 19th filing in 2013, which then Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr described  as “the Olympics of restructuring,” had been critical to ensuring continuity of essential services and critical to rebuilding an economy for the city—an economy besieged after decades of population decline (dropping from 1,849,568 in 1951 to 713,777 by 2010), leaving the city to confront an estimated 40,000 abandoned lots and structures and the loss of 67 percent of its business establishments and 80 percent of its manufacturing base. The city had spent $100 million more, on average, than its revenues since 2008. According to the census, 36 percent of its citizens were below the poverty level, and, the year prior to the city’s bankruptcy filing, Detroit reported the highest violent crime rate for any U.S. city with a population over 200,000. Thus, as the city’s first post-bankruptcy Mayor, Mayor Duggan has faced a city with vast abandoned properties.

Interestingly, Steve Tobocman, the Director of Global Detroit, an economic-development nonprofit which focuses on maximizing the potential of immigrants and the international community, said that enacting municipal policies which welcome foreign-born residents could be a critical strategy to reverse the population loss: “No American city has been able to rebound from population loss without getting serious about immigration growth…In 1980, 29 of the 50 largest cities lost population. Most of the cities that lost population have since reversed course due to an influx of immigrants. No American city has been able to rebound from population loss without getting serious about immigration growth.” Now that avenue could be closing with President Trump’s efforts to curtail immigration, especially from Mexico and the Middle East, leading Mr. Tobocman to note he had no reason to anticipate any help from Washington, D.C. in helping rebuild Detroit’s population, or energizing its economy, with immigrants. Rather, he warns, he is apprehensive that other policy promises, particularly the proposed border wall with Mexico, actively threaten Michigan’s economy: “Mexico is our second-largest trading partner after Canada…Metro Detroit is the largest metro area trading with Mexico. One hundred thousand jobs are supported by our trade with Mexico.”

Upside Down Fiscal Challenge. A key challenge to Detroit, because of the inverted fiscal pyramid creating by its population decline, is there are far fewer paying into to Detroit’s public pension system, against far more receiving post-retirement pensions, sort of an upside down fiscal dilemma—and one which, increasingly, confronts the city’s fiscal future. Now Mayor (and Candidate) Duggan has announced a plan he believes will help Detroit to city meet its 2024 balloon payment on its public pension obligation, or, as Detroit Chief Financial Officer John Hill puts it, a plan designed to be more than adequate to address the looming future payment of more than $100 million owed beginning in 2024: “What the mayor is proposing is that we take money now and put into a pension protection fund and then use that money in 2024 and beyond to help make some of those payments: So part of the money would come from the budget, and the other would come from the fund,” describing the provisions in Detroit’s plan of debt adjustment for down payments to the city’s pension obligation in Mayor Duggan’s $1 billion general fund budget for the 2017-18 fiscal year the Mayor presented to the Detroit City Council at the end of last week. Mr. Hill said that the payment plan would give the city budget longer to catch up to the $132 million it would have to pay going forward, describing it as “really a way for us to proactively address the future pension obligation payment and not wait to deal with it down the road.”

However, there appears to be a fiscal fly in the ointment: last year, in his 2016 State of the City speech, Mayor Duggan said that consultants who advised the city through its chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy had miscalculated the city’s pension deficit by $490 million—actuarial estimates at the time which projected a payment of $111 million in 2024—a figure subsequently increased by the actuary to $194.4 million—leading Mayor Duggan to assert that the payment had been “concealed” from him by former Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr during the city’s bankruptcy, with, according to the Mayor, Mr. Orr’s team using overly optimistic assumptions which made Detroit’s future pension payout obligations appear artificially low. The revised estimates have since forced the city to address the large future payment, beginning in FY2016, when the city set aside $20 million and another $10 million to start its pension trust fund, with the payment coming in addition to the $20 million contribution to the legacy plans the city is mandated to make under Detroit’s plan of debt adjustment. Now Mayor Duggan is proposing Detroit set aside an additional $50 million from a general fund surplus and another $10 million into the trust fund this year: the city projects it will have $90 million in the trust at the end of FY2017. In the following fiscal years, the city is proposing to add another $15 million to the fund, $20 million in FY2019, $45 million in FY2020, $50 million in FY2021, $55 million in FY2022, and $60 million for FY2023. Or, as Detroit Finance Director John Naglick describes it: “All total, we propose that the City would deposit $335 million into the trust fund through the end of FY23, with interest, the fund is projected to grow to $377 million.” Mr. Naglick adds that Detroit expects that the general fund would be required to contribute a total of $143.2 million beginning in FY2024: “We propose to make that payment by pulling $78.5 million out of the trust and appropriating $64.7 million from the general fund that year.” CFO Hill noted that by addressing the 2024 obligation payment with the plan, Detroit would remain on track to exit state oversight as projected, stating: “We believe that after we have executed three balanced budgets and met a number of other requirements that the Detroit Review Commission could vote to waive their oversight…We believe that one of the factors that they are going to want to see to support that waiver is that we have proactively dealt with the pension obligations in 2024.” There could, however, be a flaw in the ointment: Mayor Duggan warned last week that Detroit may decide to sue Mr. Orr’s law firm, Jones Day, if the city finds that Mr. Orr had an obligation to keep the city informed on the pension payments.

The Challenge of Post-Insolvency Governance

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eBlog, 2/21/17

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the role of citizens when a municipality emerges from municipal bankruptcy—and at how little effort seems to have been taken for such cities to share with each other. Then we take a gamble at the roulette wheels in Atlantic City, where the third branch of government, the judiciary, is weighing in even as candidates for next year’s Mayoral election from the City Council are announcing.  

The Challenge of Emerging from Chapter 9 Municipal Bankruptcy. San Bernardino Neighborhood Association Council President Amelia Lopez recently asked if the city’s emergence from municipal bankruptcy might mark the moment to change the city from the ground up, or, as Ms. Lopez put it: “Coming out of bankruptcy is an opportunity…The city is looking for direction. We’re here to have a say in that direction.” No U.S. city has ever been in bankruptcy for as long as San Bernardino, so the question she is raising might singularly impact the city’s future. Yet it comes at a time when citizen activism has altered: of San Bernardino’s 60 neighborhoods, 19 or 20 are active, compared to 30 a decade ago. But the Neighborhood Association Council plans to send representatives to a national convention of neighborhood associations in March and to try to work more closely with elected San Bernardino leaders. It would be interesting were the Council to try to contact comparable neighborhood organizations in Stockton, Jefferson County, and Detroit to both learn what efforts had worked—and which had failed.

Thinking about Tomorrow: A City’s Post Insolvency & State Takeover Future? Notwithstanding Atlantic City’s current status as a ward of the State of New Jersey, there appears to be strong interest in the city’s future elected leadership—albeit, at least to date, an absence of substantive proposals from aspiring candidates. Atlantic City Councilman Frank Gilliam yesterday officially jumped into the mayor’s race, joining previously announced candidate Edward Lea.  Mr. Gilliam, a Democrat, kicked off his campaign with his slate of council running mates—where he spoke about addressing high taxes, unemployment, foreclosures, and other issues, vowing brighter days would come under new leadership: “The Atlantic City that we see right now will not be the Atlantic City we will see in the future…There will be prosperity. There will be equality. There will be fairness from the bottom to the top.” Councilmember Gilliam has served on the City Council since 2010; now he joins a crowded primary: he will face Council President Marty Small and Fareed Abdullah in the June Democratic primary, with the winner set to take on Republican Mayor Don Guardian next November. Councilman Gilliam’s running mates are incumbent Councilmen Moisse “Mo” Delgado, George Tibbitt, and candidate Jeffree Fauntleroy II, who are all seeking at-large seats. Last Friday, candidate Abdullah, a substitute teacher and former City Council candidate, said would also be running for Mayor—meaning a three-way Democratic primary, with the winner to challenge incumbent Republican Mayor Don Guardian.

Councilman Gilliam last year voted against a number of proposals to address the city’s finances, including measures to seek bids for services, dissolve the city’s water authority and approve the administration’s fiscal recovery plan to avoid a state takeover. In some cases, he cited a lack of information about the proposals, or in the case of the fiscal plan, not enough time to review the information. In announcing his bid, he noted: “People elected me to vote on what I think is best for them, not what my other colleagues think is best for them…When you give an individual a document five hours before a vote, that doesn’t give me the proper opportunity to have my fellow folks aware that I’m making the best-informed decision…For too long Atlantic City’s politics and the leaders of this city have sucked the blood out of our town…The time for new leadership is right now.”

Fire in the Hole. Aspiring to be an elected leader in a municipality where the state has preempted such authority comes as the challenge of governing an insolvent city has become more complex and challenging in the wake of Atlantic City Superior Court Judge Julio Mendez restraining order early this month barring the State of New Jersey from cutting Atlantic City’s firefighter workforce or unilaterally altering any of their contracts as part of its state takeover—a judicial decision which caused Moody’s Investors Services to be decidedly moody, deeming Judge Mendez’s decision a credit negative for the cash-strapped city. Or, as the crack credit rating analyst for Moody’s Douglas Goldmacher last week noted: “These developments signal that any actions the state takes to reduce the city’s work force or abrogate labor contracts will prompt a legal challenge, leading to considerable delays in the Atlantic City recovery process, a credit negative for the city…The success or failure of the state to implement broad expenditure cuts for Atlantic City is of tremendous import to the city’s credit quality.” Mr. Goldmacher noted that negotiations with the firefighters and other unions would typically be handled by city officials; however, the Municipal Stabilization and Recovery Act legislation approved by New Jersey lawmakers last year enables the state to alter outstanding municipal contracts, an authority which has now been rendered uncertain. Mr. Goldmacher noted that the firefighters’ court challenge could pave the way for other unions to challenge staffing cuts—effectively handcuffing both municipal and state efforts. He wrote that current city revenues are “insufficient” for debt service and routine expenditures making budget cuts the most likely avenue for permanent financial improvement: “Leaving aside the question of constitutionality, extensive litigation will delay negotiations…Even if other unions refrain from filing suit, the state’s negotiations will be materially impacted by the ongoing lawsuit, delaying or even preventing cost-cutting efforts.”

Lone Star Blues

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eBlog, 2/16/17

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the dwindling timeline confronting the city of Dallas to take action to avert a potential municipal bankruptcy; then we return to the small municipality of Petersburg, Virginia—an insolvent city with what appears to be an increasingly insolvent governing model, enmeshing the small city in litigation it can ill afford. Finally, we return to the trying governing and fiscal challenges in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico—caught between changing administrations, a federal oversight board, a disparate Medicaid regime than for other states and counties, and trying to adjust to a new Administration and Congress.

Dallas, Humpty-Dumpty, & Chapter 9? In a state where, as one state and local government expert yesterday described it, that state has created a governance structure which allows everyone to avoid accountability, the City of Dallas is confronting a public pension problem that could force the city into municipal bankruptcy [Texas Local Government Code §101.006—seven Texas towns and cities have filed for such protection.]. Should the city lose its current case against its firefighters—a case with some $4 billion at stake—municipal bankruptcy could ensue. Another Texan, noting the challenge of putting “Humpty Dumpty back together again,” said failure of the city to emulate Houston and come to terms with its employees, retirees, and taxpayers would be “cataclysmic.” With about two weeks remaining to file bills in the Longhorn legislature and negotiations over the city’s mismanaged and underfunded police and fire pension at a standstill, state lawmakers note they will likely be forced to step into the crisis, if the city is to avoid chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy—or, as Rep. Jason Villalba (R-Dallas) noted: “I think we’re forced to step in. We’re [17] days away from the deadline, and there is yet to be an agreement between the city and the pension board…I think at this point we have to have a summit or some form of intervention, get everyone to the table and hammer those final issues down. If they don’t do that, it’s going to be a plan that’s drawn by the legislators, and we don’t have a stake interest like the other groups do to understand the nuances.” His statement came in the wake of a stoppage in negotiations over the last couple weeks—negotiations originally set up by the state, and negotiations with a short fuse: the last chance for the Texas Legislature to file bills to address the issue is looming: March 1st.

The severity of the crisis could be partially alleviated by a settlement reached late yesterday by the failing Dallas Police and Fire Pension System in its litigation against its former real estate advisers, whom pension officials had accused of leading the retirement fund astray. CDK Realty Advisors and the Dallas pension system both agreed to drop all claims and counterclaims with prejudice, according to court records filed late yesterday—and came as the city’s pension system and its attorneys have also been battling litigation from four City Council members, Mayor Mike Rawlings, a former contract auditor, and active and retired police and firefighters. The stakes are the city’s fiscal future: its retirement fund is now set to become insolvent within the next decade because of major losses and overvaluations—mostly from real estate—and generous benefits guaranteed by the system. Advising me that the “stigma or consequences for a city with the pride and stature of Dallas to fail would be cataclysmic,” one of the nation’s most insightful state and local pension wizards described the city’s pension challenge as “about as bad as any I have ever seen.”  

Hear Ye—or Hear Ye Not. A hearing for the civil case brought against Petersburg Mayor Samuel Parham and Councilman and former Mayor W. Howard Myers is set for this morning: Both men are defendants in a civil court case brought about by members of registered voters from the fifth and third wards of Petersburg: members of the third and fifth wards signed petitions to have both men removed from their positions. The civil case calls for both Parham and Myers to be removed from office due to “neglect, misuse of office, and incompetence in the performance of their duties.” The purpose of hearing is to determine a trial date, to hear any motions, to determine whether Messieurs Parham and Myers will be tried separately, and if they want to be tried by judge or jury. James E. Cornwell of Sands Anderson Law Firm will be representing Myers and Parham. The City Council voted 5-2 on Tuesday night to have the representation of Mr. Myers and Mayor Parham be paid for by the city. Mayor Parham, Vice Mayor Joe Hart, Councilman Charlie Cuthbert, former Mayor Myers, and Councilman Darrin Hill all voted yes to the proposition, while Councilwoman Treska Wilson-Smith and Councilwoman Annette Smith-Lee voted no. Mayor Parham and Councilmember Hill stated that the Council’s decision to pay for the representation was necessary to “protect the integrity of the Council,” noting: “It may not be a popular decision, but it’s [Myers and Parham] today, and it could be another council tomorrow.” Messieurs Hill and Parham argued that the recall petition could happen to any member of council: “[The petitions] are a total attack on our current leadership…We expect to get the truth told and these accusations against us laid to rest.” The legal confrontation is further muddied by City Attorney Joseph Preston’s inability to represent the current and former Mayors, because he was also named in the recall petition, and could be called as a witness during a trial.

Municipal Governance Bankruptcy? Virginia Commonwealth’s Attorney Cassandra Conover has felt forced to write a complaint, suggesting a conflict of interest in the virtually insolvent municipality of Petersburg, Virginia, in the wake of a city council vote to have the city pay for the legal expenses of Mayor Samuel Parham and Councilman Howard Myers. Ms. Conover, in an advisory opinion, described the vote to approve those expenses as a conflict of interest for the current and former mayors: “It is my advisory opinion that the undeclared conflict of interest disqualified both councilmen from voting on this motion and renders the vote invalid.” (The vote in question, as we have previously noted, was to hire a private attorney to represent Mayor Sam Parham and Councilman Howard Myers after more than 400 neighbors signed a petition to oust two Councilmembers from office.) Ms. Conover cited Virginia Code §2.2-3112, which says an employee of a state or local government entity “shall disqualify himself from participating in the transaction where the transaction involves a property or business or governmental agency in which he has a personal interest,” noting that Code §2.2-3115(F) mandates that in such a situation, there must be oral or written statements that show the transaction involved; the nature of the employee’s personal interest: that he (or she) is a member of a business, profession, occupation or group of members which are affected by the transaction: and that he is able to participate fairly, objectively and in the public interest. In this case, Ms. Conover stated that there was “no evidence that all four of these requirements were met in this case: concluding that the undeclared conflict of interest disqualified both men from voting and renders the vote invalid. 

The governance issue was not just the concept of an insolvent city’s Council voting to use public municipal funds to hire the private attorney, but also that neither Mayor Parham, nor Councilmember Myers recused himself from voting. Nevertheless, Petersburg City Attorney Joseph Preston responded that there was no conflict of interest and that the pair of elected officials had acted legally. Mayor Parham said the city likely will pay the bill for the personal attorney he and Councilmember Myers retained, albeit noting: “We’ve had to make cuts to schools and public safety, and we’re just starting to get back on our feet. It is a shame that we have to pump funds into something like this.” City Attorney Preston noted that Ms. Conover’s advisory opinion “adequately represents what occurred at their council meeting,” but he said he believes the pair of elected officials were legally allowed to take part in the vote, citing Virginia Code §2.2-3112 which provides that persons who have a conflict of interest can submit a disclosure statement on the issue—filings which the two elected officials filed with the Clerk of Court’s office the day after the vote. In addition, City Attorney Preston cited a decision from the Virginia Attorney General’s Office from 2009 which had ruled in favor of the Gloucester County Board of Supervisors, who were seeking compensation for their legal expenses; Ms. Conover, however, responded that the Attorney General’s 2009 decision did not apply to this case, because the charges against the Gloucester Board of Supervisors had been dismissed, and the court ordered the locality to pay for the majority of the legal fees which the board members had accrued, adding that the insolvent city had offered no estimate with regard to how much their legal fees could be. Notwithstanding the Commonwealth Attorney’s opinion, it appears unlikely that the Council will vote on the issue again: Mayor Parham yesterday noted: “I don’t feel like there was any conflict, and we did as we were advised by our attorney…We’ve had to make cuts to schools and public safety, and we’re just starting to get back on our feet. It is a shame that we have to pump funds into something like this.”  

Federalism, Governance, & Hegemony. With the enactment of the PROMESA legislation, Congress created governance and fiscal oversight responsibilities in the hands of seven non-elected officials to make critical fiscal reforms and restructuring of Puerto Rico—either through federal courts or via voluntary negotiations—for a debt that adds up to about $69 billion, but the new law also tasked a Congressional Task Force with analyzing initiatives which could help the island’s economy to grow; however, this bipartisan and bicameral committee ceased to exist upon submitting its report; ergo, unsurprisingly, both Governor Ricardo Rosselló and Jenniffer González, the new Resident Commissioner for Puerto Rico, have demanded that the PROMESA board members support their claims. But now a key area of concern has arisen: if the U.S. territory is unable to comply with the implementation of an information system which methodically integrates the management of important data for Medicaid claims—as mandated for federal eligibility as part of an integrated system to process claims and recover information, which is a Medicaid program requirement for federal fund eligibility which Puerto Rico should have long ago met, the island faces a more stark January 1 deadline by which it must comply with 60% of this system or be confronted with a fine of $147 million—a threat so dire that, according to the Health Secretary, Dr. Rafael Rodríguez Mercado, failing to comply with this requirement would mean the end of the Puerto Rico Government Health Plan. Puerto Rico is the only jurisdiction lacking such a platform, a platform intended to protect against medical fraud and establish eligibility, compliance, and service quality controls.

It was revealed in December, during the new government’s transition hearings for the Department of Health that the development of this platform began in 2011, but that it was not until 2014 that the project was resumed in its planning stage. The necessary funds to begin the implementation phase were finally matched during this fiscal year. The last administration predicted that the basic modules would begin working in a year and a half, and that the entire system would be operating in five years: it was expected that the window for the disbursement of Medicare and Medicaid funds would open in a year and a half. However, under threat of a fine, the government now expects to reach this goal before the date predicted by the last administration. Dr. Rodríguez Mercado stressed that there are currently 470,000 Puerto Ricans without health care insurance, many of whom cannot afford private insurance or are ineligible for the Government Health Plan, thus, many of these people seek out services in Centro Médico, an institution with a multi-million dollar deficit, when they become sick or are injured. Dr. Mercado further noted the disproportionate percentage of Medicare and Medicaid fraud cases, further undermining the territory’s credibility with the federal government—and, adding that local governments have complied  with the implementation of a Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU), which he says falls under the purview of the Department of Justice. Nevertheless, despite differing points of emphasis, both the leadership of the PROMESA Oversight Board and Resident Commissioner Jenifer González yesterday restated the importance of preventing Puerto Rico’s healthcare system from falling into a fiscal abyss, given the depletion of the $1.2 billion in Medicaid funds which has been provided on an annual basis under the Affordable Care Act.

Yesterday, in the wake of separate meetings with Commissioner González, with one of Speaker Paul Ryan’s advisors, and with Congresswoman Elise Stefanik (R-NY), PROMESA Oversight Board Chair José Carrión claimed that “we always try to include healthcare and economic development issues” in the meetings held in Congress, describing meetings in which he had been joined by Board member Carlos García and interim executive director, Ramón Ruiz Comas, as sessions to provide updates, while trying to deal with the issue which most concerns the Board: health care—emphasizing that especially in the wake of the end of the Congressional Task Force on Economic Growth in Puerto Rico.  

Fighting for Cities’ Futures

eBlog, 1/23/17

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the ongoing fiscal and governing challenge to Detroit’s future—especially with regard to the quality of education for the city’s future leaders; then we learn from one of the unsung heroes, retired U.S. Judge Gerald Rosen, about his reflections and role in Detroit’s exit from the largest municipal bankruptcy in American history. Then we return to the historic Virginia municipality of Petersburg, where, in its struggle to exit insolvency, a citizen effort is underway to recall its elected leaders. Finally, in the category of ‘when it rains it pours,’ we consider the city hall relocation underway in San Bernardino—one month before it hopes to gain U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Meredith Jury’s approval of the city’s plan of debt adjustment, permitting the city to egress from the longest municipal bankruptcy in American history.

Fighting for Detroit’s Fiscal Future. The City of Detroit is siding with seven Detroit public schoolchildren suing Gov. Rick Snyder and Michigan state education officials over their right to access literacy. (See Jessie v. Snyder, #16-CV-13292, U.S. District Court), having filed an amicus brief in a proposed class action lawsuit against Gov. Snyder and Michigan education officials in a legal challenge seeking to establish that literacy is a U.S. constitutional right. The suit, which was filed last September by a California public interest law firm, claims the state has functionally excluded Detroit children from the state’s educational system; the suit seeks class-action status and several guarantees of equal access to literacy, screening, intervention, a statewide accountability system, as well as other measures. Detroit’s amicus brief urged the court to hold access to literacy as being fundamental, arguing the plaintiffs have alleged sufficient facts to show they are being denied that right: “Denying children access to literacy today inevitably impedes tomorrow’s job seekers and taxpayers; fathers and mothers; citizens and voters…That is why the Supreme Court has stressed the ‘significant social costs borne by our nation’ when children suffer the ‘stigma of illiteracy’—and are thereby denied ‘the basic tools by which (to) lead economically productive lives to the benefit of us all…The City of Detroit (though it does not control Detroit’s schools) is all too familiar with illiteracy’s far-reaching effects.”

A critical fiscal issue for every city and county is the perceived quality of its public schools—a perception critical to encouraging families with children to move into the city—thereby positively affecting assessed property values. The challenge has been greater in Detroit, where the schools’ fiscal and educational insolvencies led to the appointment of former U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes to serve as DPS’s Emergency Manager. In Detroit, politics at the state level imposing a disproportionate number of charter schools has meant that today Detroit has a greater share of students in charters than any U.S. city except New Orleans; however, half the charters perform only as well, or worse than, Detroit’s traditional public schools—mayhap a challenge of having a state attempt to substitute itself over local control. Perhaps former state representative Thomas F. Stallworth III, who helped navigate the passage of the 2014 legislation that paved Detroit’s way out of bankruptcy, put it more succinctly: “We’ll either invest in our own children and prepare them to fill these jobs, or I suppose maybe people will migrate from other places in the country to fill them…If that’s the case, we are still left with this underbelly of generational poverty with no clear path out.”

But, in Michigan, it appears that it has been for-profit companies that expressed the greatest interest: they now operate about 80 percent of charters in Michigan, far more than in any other state. In the wake of the state action, and even as Michigan and Detroit continued to preside over an exodus of families, the number of charter schools grew: Michigan today has nearly 220,000 fewer students than it did in 2003, but more than 100 new charter schools. The number not only grew, but the legislature made sure accountability did not: the legislature in 2012 repealed in the Revised School Code Act 451 the state’s longstanding requirement that the Michigan Department of Education issue annual reports monitoring charter school performance; and the state even created a state-run school district, with new charters, in an effort to try to turn around Detroit’s lowest performing schools. Indeed, 24 charter schools have opened in Detroit since the legislature removed the cap 2011: eighteen charters whose existing schools were at or below Detroit’s dismal performance expanded or opened new schools—that despite increasing evidence students in one company’s schools grew less academically than students in the neighboring traditional public schools. By 2015, the Education Trust-Midwest Michigan noted that charter school authorizers’ performance overall had improved marginally over the previous year, but remained terribly low compared to leading states’ charter sectors, in its report, Accountability for All: 2016, The Broken Promise of Michigan’s Charter Sector. The report celebrates high-performing authorizers and sheds light on the devastatingly low performance of other authorizers, adding that roughly one-quarter of one group’s eligible schools ranked among the worst performing 10 percent of schools statewide. Similarly, according to the Trust, a federal review of a grant application for Michigan charter schools found an “unreasonably high” number of charters among the worst-performing 5 percent of public schools statewide, even as the number of charters on the list had doubled from 2010 to 2014.

The great press to create charter schools has led to another challenge: today Detroit has roughly 30,000 more seats, charter and traditional public, than students. For a system desperate for investment in quality education, instead it has badly failed in elementary math; and there is great risk of a discriminatory system: Detroit Public Schools today bears the human and fiscal burden of trying to educate most of Detroit’s special education students. In contrast, charter schools are concentrated downtown, with its boom in renovation and wealthier residents. With only 1,894 high school age students, there are 11 high schools. Meanwhile, northwest Detroit — where it seems every other house is boarded up, burned or abandoned — has nearly twice the number of high school age students, 3,742, and just three high schools. The northeastern part of the city is even more of an education desert: 6,018 high school age students and two high schools.

Like others elsewhere, charter schools receive roughly the same per-pupil state dollars as public schools; however, in Detroit, it is about $7,300 a year — roughly half what New York or Boston schools get, and about $3,500 less than charters in Denver or Milwaukee.

With the significant fiscal challenges to the Detroit Public Schools, Mayor Mike Duggan had proposed an appointed Detroit Education Commission to determine which neighborhoods most needed new schools and to set standards to close failing schools and ensure that only high performing or promising ones could replicate. Backed by a coalition of philanthropies and civic leaders, the teachers’ union and some charter school operators, Mayor Duggan has succeeded in restoring local control of majority-black Detroit Public Schools, and supported the proposal. In the waning days of the legislative session, House Republicans offered a deal: $617 million to pay off the debt of the Detroit Public Schools, but no commission. Lawmakers were forced to take it to prevent the city school system from going bankrupt.

An Interview with Gerald Rosen. U.S. District Court Judge Gerald Rosen, who, as we have written, played an invaluable role in the so-called “Grand Bargain,” which paved the way for Detroit to exit the largest chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history—and who will now join retired U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes, who presided over Detroit’s municipal bankruptcy, in an interview with the Detroit Free Press, said, in response to the query how well Detroit was doing in adhering to its court approved plan of debt adjustment:  “We are hitting the marks, exceeding them in most areas — certainly revenue, I think the last report I saw was about 2 percent above the projected revenue. On budget. Expenditures are below — not much — but slightly below what was projected. Those are two important things…Certainly, investment and growth in the downtown area, certainly Midtown, and with the Ilitch development coming to fruition, the Red Wings, Pistons, some of the entertainment venues becoming a reality now, I expect the area between Midtown and downtown will become very vibrant over the next two-three years.”

Asked what the most difficult part of that case was, aside from the Grand Bargain, Judge Rosen responded: “You have to go back and see what the case was when we found it, which was an assetless bankruptcy. That was the most difficult part, for me. Certainly, there were a lot of first-impression legal issues. Certainly there were issues that could have gone all the way up to the U.S. Supreme Court, whether it was the collision between the federal bankruptcy code and the federal constitutional supremacy clause and the Michigan Constitution’s provisions to protect pensions. But there were also a lot of other really important issues: The tenor of the security instruments, of the finance instruments, the level and tenor of their security, were all major issues in the bankruptcy, whether they could be crammed down all across the rope line on the financial creditors’ side were really first-impression issues.” He added: “Overwhelmingly, the most challenging issue for me was an assetless bankruptcy—other than the art. I’ll never forget when I was reading Kevyn Orr’s proposal for creditors, coming to the asset section and realizing that there really weren’t any assets other than the art…It was devastating. Kevyn, he had just hired Christie’s to appraise the art, so he was clearly serious about it. I remember thinking, ‘What the hell have I gotten myself into?’ My job is to get deals. To get deals, you have to have revenue or assets that can be monetized into revenue, and the cupboard was pretty much bare. There didn’t seem to be much to work with for deals, other than the art.

There were other aspects to the DIA that I was concerned about. This was a time when Detroit was cannibalizing its heritage to mortgage its future, consistently over the decades. In terms of Detroit’s future, it didn’t make sense to me to do that again, but I was realistic.

Time was Detroit’s enemy. The only way to get through the bankruptcy in any sort of expeditious way was through consensual agreements, and the only asset that could be monetized was the art. So that’s basically what led to the idea of the Grand Bargain—trying to figure out a way to monetize the art without liquidating it, and giving the proceeds to the retirees. Neat trick.

I’ll never forget sitting in this little condo (in Florida) thinking, “What the hell have I gotten myself into? Is my legacy going to be that we liquidated one of the great art collections in the world for sheikhs in Dubai and oligarchs in Russia?” I wasn’t very excited about that.

There was another aspect too. One of the few nascently growing areas in Detroit was Midtown. I went on the DIA website and I saw that the DIA attracted over 600,000 people a year to Midtown. I thought, “Gee whiz, liquidating the DIA would be like dropping a hydrogen bomb in Midtown.” It would suck the life out of it. So there was that part of it.”

What would be the theme song for Detroit’s bankruptcy case?

“Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow.”

We might be having some new City Council members a year from now. What would you suggest to the new ones potentially coming on board?

“I’m not in politics. I’m not a political person in the sense of being involved in the political maw, but my observation is that Mayor (Mike) Duggan is working very positively with President (Brenda) Jones and other members of the council in a way that has not been done by any mayor in years and years.

“At the same time, my word of caution is that we have to be careful to continue to provide the fertile ground that Detroit is for investment for people coming in. Part of that is not placing onerous regulation on people coming in, with artificial employment requirements. I understand the social need for that and I applaud it. I think if Detroit is going to continue the comeback that we are on, the neighborhoods have to be part of it and the African-American population has to be part of it. But you can’t disincentivize people coming in.”

You think that’s been done recently?

“I’m a little bit concerned about the community benefits ordinance. The one that was passed was certainly better than the alternative, but I’m still leery of it because it’s creating entry barriers.”

What was the most surprising individual (Kwame Kilpatrick text) message you saw?

“A lot of that is sealed. I would just refer to it generically by saying there was very little public business conducted by the Mayor and his associates. I’m sure they conducted business by communication means other than texts, but these were city-provided pagers. I assume that the city provided the pagers for people to be able to conduct city business on them, and I saw very little. I learned a lot of new text language that I hadn’t known before, and I appreciate urbandictionary.com.”

Twenty-four hours left in the Obama administration. It’s pardon and commutation time. Does the former mayor deserve one?

No. Absolutely not. I have to be a little cautious, but I presided over that grand jury for 2 ½ years.

Political Leadership & Municipal Insolvency. In Virginia, Petersburg residents who blame their elected municipal leaders for their city’s collapse into insolvency have filed dual petitions to oust both the incumbent and former mayor from their City Council seats—after, over months, gathering the legally required number of signatures from registered voters of Wards 3 and 5 to ask for the removal of Mayor Samuel Parham and W. Howard Myers, whose term as mayor ended this month; both are up for re-election next year. According to the petition, Mayor Parham “has conducted himself in the office of City Councilman, Vice Mayor and Mayor in such a way to govern the City of Petersburg chaotically, unpredictably, secretly and wastefully.” The two-page cover sheet to the petition has garnered 276 certified signatures. (Virginia law requires the petitioners to gather signatures equal to 10 percent of the voter turnout in the contest that resulted in an official’s initial election. For Parham, the number is 160.) The petitions were filed on January 20th in Petersburg Circuit Court under a provision in Virginia law which allows the court to remove officials for specific reasons, which includes certain criminal convictions. Here, in this instance, petitioners cited “neglect of duty, misuse of office, or incompetence in the performance of duties,” faulting the current and former mayor with failing to heed warnings of Petersburg’s impending insolvency, but also alleging ethical breaches and violations of open government law. “Nothing has happened in the new year, with the installation of new council officers, to demonstrate that Myers or Parham are any more capable of providing effective oversight of city government than they have over the past two years,” according to Ms. Barb Rudolph, a local activist and organizer of the good government group Clean Sweep Petersburg. The effort came as Petersburg’s mounting legal claims have now exceeded nearly $19 million in past-due invoices and the city’s budget which was $12 million over budget: the municipality has experienced a stretch of structurally imbalanced budgets dating back to 2009. The City Council fired former City Manager William E. Johnson II last March. For his part, Mayor Parham defended his decisions since taking office, reporting he has done the best he could with the guidance he has received, and noting: “I serve at the pleasure of the people of Petersburg and, with God as my witness, I have tried my best.”

The ouster filings came as former Richmond City Manager, now consultant Robert Bobb, has been hired by the City Council to try to put the city back into solvency. Mr. Bobb has issued a request for a forensic audit of spending over the past three fiscal years—notwithstanding reservations expressed by City Attorney Joseph Preston, who noted that the city’s finances are included in a special grand jury investigation which began as a probe of the Petersburg Police Department. Petersburg obtained short-term financing last month to help meet payroll and other ongoing expenses, with Mr. Bobb reporting the cost of Petersburg’s outstanding invoices has been cut from nearly $19 million to about $6 million. Next comes a session to meet with about 400 of the city’s vendors to try to begin to sort out what they are owed, with a city spokesperson Thursday stating the Petersburg has entered into a payment plan to make good on Petersburg’s share of employee and school worker pensions overdue to the Virginia Retirement System: Petersburg and the city school division collectively owed just over $4.2 million to the system as of last week; however, current payments have resumed, and plans are in place to pay down the balance by $100,000 each month, officials said.

The citizen petitions focus largely on events from last year, but reference years of mounting trouble. The issue for the courts is sufficiency, as a judge in Bath County last week demonstrated when the judge dismissed a similar petition to remove three members of the county’s Board of Supervisors, finding the complaints raised by residents there were insufficient to require a judicial reversal of election results. However, Ms. Rudolph said the Petersburg petitions contain more serious charges, noting: “We believe that, on its merits, it’s far more substantive than the Bath County removal action that was recently rejected by the circuit court there.” Included among the two-page list of grievances documenting reasons for Mayor Myers’ removal were allegations he had “flagrantly and repeatedly acted in contravention of the City of Petersburg’s Code of Ethics” by attempting to “intimidate and silence a critic,” who remains unnamed, by “attempting to harm the citizen’s good standing with her employer.” Petitioners also criticized the Myers-led council for possibly violating the Council’s own rules and the city charter in holding a re-do of a vote to bring in the Bobb Group two days after an initial measure to hire the firm failed. City Attorney Preston has said that the Council did nothing wrong.

Quake & Shake. San Bernardino, on track to end the longest chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history next month, now faces a physical and fiscal challenge not listed in its plan of debt adjustment: a substantial earthquake risk. San Bernardino has two independent engineering evaluations — from 2007 and 2016 — saying City Hall would be unsafe in an earthquake. Specifically, the February 2016 study concludes a magnitude 6.0 earthquake would lead to “a likelihood of building failure” for City Hall, which was designed before code updates following the 1971 Sylmar and 1994 Northridge earthquakes. The building sits along two fault lines. That means the City has plans for vacating City Hall by April, as all employees move out of a building determined to be a substantial earthquake risk, with the approximately 200 municipal employees set to relocate to several leased sites set by a unanimous Council vote. A public information counter will direct members of the public to whatever service they’re seeking, as will signs.

Governance Insolvency?

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eBlog, 1/0617

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the political and legal turmoil in the insolvent municipality of East Cleveland, before turning to the continued uncertainty with regard to Atlantic City’s future. Then we try to get schooled in the new governance set to commence for Detroit’s public schools, before returning to what appears to be a state of emergency declared this week by the new Governor of Puerto Rico.

Bankrupt Municipal Governance? The insolvent city of East Cleveland is confronted not just with fiscal insolvency, but, increasingly, governance chaos in the wake of the recall of its former Mayor and the city’s Law Director, Willa Hemmons, yesterday issuing a legal opinion that appointments made to the City Council last week were illegal. That opinion was countered late yesterday by East Cleveland Councilwoman Barbara Thomas, who issued a statement contradicting Ms. Hemmons’ opinion that appointments to council made in a December 29th meeting were illegal, writing that not only was there an absence of a quorum, but also the actions were in violation of the city’s charter. The Councilwoman, who represents Ward 2, and Nathaniel Martin, at-large council member, had selected Devin Branch and Kelvin Earby to fill the Ward 3 and at-large seats left open when voters recalled former Council President Thomas Wheeler and Mayor Gary Norton. Ward 4 councilwoman Joie Graham had left the meeting last week during executive session, because she did not agree with the interview process for new members. In response, Councilwoman Thomas, in a statement, claimed she had met with an unnamed attorney and believes that Law Director Hemmons has confused “charter positions which apply to organizational meetings of City Council following a regular election with the procedures Council is required to follow to fill a vacancy on Council.” In addition, the Councilwoman charged the document was improperly served. Thus, she stated: “I am disappointed, because I had hoped that having a new mayor would give us an opportunity for a fresh start and that the administration and Council would work together for the benefit of the citizens of East Cleveland.”

Confused Governance. Meanwhile, in Atlantic City—which has a Mayor and Council and a state appointed Emergency Manager, but which is under a state takeover, Mayor Don Guardian yesterday offered his now unofficial State of the City speech. Unsurprisingly, he listed the numerous challenges facing his city, including a state takeover and hundreds of millions of dollars in debt. Mayor Guardian also requested billionaire investor Carl Icahn to sell the abandoned Trump Taj Mahal Casino, stating the city cannot afford to allow such a critical component of its historic boardwalk to continue vacant indefinitely, deeming such inactions the “the worst of the worst” in terms of outcomes for the property—and the city’s tax rolls. The Tropicana, which was boarded up last October, not only hammered the city’s anticipated property tax revenues, but meant 3,000 people lost their jobs, and, of course, the city lost a key attraction for visitors. Mr. Icahn had shuttered it last fall in the wake of a strike by the casino’s workers’ union. Mr. Icahn, however, responded by saying he would be happy to sell the casino to the insolvent city, but only if the city made Mr. Icahn whole by paying him the $300 million he claims he had lost on his real estate gamble, adding Mayor Guardian was wrong to attack an investor who had previously rescued the city’s Tropicana casino and attempted to do the same with the Tropicana. Prior to last summer’s strike to restore health insurance and pension benefits—which had been terminated in federal bankruptcy court—and the subsequent closure, Mr. Icahn had promised to invest some $100 million into the casino—a promise never kept.

Learning to Govern in the Big D. With the retirement of former U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes, who had so generously accepted the Governor’s challenge to serve as the Detroit Public School Emergency Manager, Detroit’s newly elected school board is planning a major celebration this month as it will assume control of city schools which have been under gubernatorial-appointed emergency managers for years. Moreover, with the state having creating a dual system of public and charter schools, the governing challenge for these new school board members promises to be daunting. Whom will the newly elected board select to be superintendent? Will a majority vote to file suit to prevent further school closures? How will the new board address the challenge of balancing state-created charter schools versus public schools? How can the new Board create balance so that there can be a smooth transition with long-struggling schools which will rejoin the district this summer?  The seven board members who were elected by Detroit voters in November have been doing some prep learning themselves: they have devoted the last two months in an intensive orientation on Detroit schools, trying to comprehend a complicated district which now serves about 45,000 children in 97 schools—children who will be future civic leaders, but, mayhap more importantly, a school system whose reputation will be critical in determining whether young families with children will opt to move into Detroit—or leave the city.

Extraordinary Governmental Authority & Promising Insurance? In Puerto Rico, Governor Ricardo Rosselló Nevares this week signed a decree which provides him extraordinary authority, similar to those granted a governor in the wake of a natural disaster. The new executive order declares a state of emergency, with the emergency creating a “risk of accelerating capital flight from the territory, putting at risk natural resources, and risking public health and safety.” The new Governor’s actions came as the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico and some of its instrumentalities failed to make municipal bond interest payments this week, Puerto Rico’s largest municipal bond insurer, Assured Guaranty Ltd. subsidiaries, made $43 million of interest payments to holders of insured general obligation and other municipal bonds. The payments came as Puerto Rico’s infrastructure financing authority PRIFA was unable to transfer funds to its bond trustee to pay debt due New Year’s Day on certain tax-exempt bonds, according to a regulatory filing on Tuesday, further confirmation of a default by the U.S. territory. The trustee for PRIFA’s series 2005B and 2006 bonds claimed it had not received sufficient funds from PRIFA for the payment of debt, although it held a small residual amount from prior payments that it allocated to pay interest. In addition, the trustee for its series 2005 C bonds reported it did not receive funds from PRIFA to pay debt service. The territory had said last week that PRIFA would have insufficient funds to make the full payment on its special tax revenue bonds, Series 2005A-C and Series 2006; ergo, $36 million was expected not to be paid. As of midweek, the island’s largest bond insurer, Assured Guaranty Municipal Corp. and Assured Guaranty Corp. had received and processed $43 million of claim notices for missed January 1 payments, out of $44 million of total expected claims, with the expected claims including $39 million of Puerto Rico general obligation payments and $5 million for Puerto Rico Public Buildings Authority payments. In addition, on Tuesday, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority made the full interest payment due on its bonds insured by Assured Guaranty; thus, no insurance claims were filed. In a statement, Assured President and CEO Dominic Frederico said: “While the outgoing Puerto Rico administration has once again chosen to violate Puerto Rico’s constitution by ignoring the senior payment priority securing the Commonwealth’s general obligation bonds, we look forward to working with the new administration, PROMESA Oversight Board and other creditors to achieve consensual restructuring agreements that respect the constitutional, statutory, contractual and property rights of creditors while also supporting the island’s economic recovery…We were pleased that PREPA made its bond interest payment, and we continue to join PREPA and the other participating creditors in seeking implementation of the consensual restructuring contemplated by the PREPA restructuring support agreement.” In its release, the company wrote that any obligor where amounts were due but no claims are expected, the payments were made by the obligor from its available funds or reserves, adding that municipal bond investors owning Puerto Rico-related bonds insured by Assured Guaranty will continue to receive uninterrupted full and timely payment of scheduled principal and interest in accordance with the terms of the insurance policies.

The Daunting Road to Recovery from the Nation’s Longest Ever Municipal Bankruptcy

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eBlog, 12/09/16

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we look back on the long and rocky road from the nation’s longest municipal bankruptcy back to solvency taken by the City of San Bernardino, a city in a Dillon Rule state, which we described in our original study as the former gateway from the East to Midwest of the L.A. basin and former home to Norton Air Force Base, Kaiser Steel, and the Santa Fe Railroad, but which in the 1990’s, with the departure of those industries and employees, fell into hard times. By the advent of the Great Recession, 46% of its residents were on some form of public assistance—and nearly one-third below the poverty line. By FY2012, the city faced a $45 million deficit; its fund balance and reserves were exhausted—leading the city to file for chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy (note California codes §§53760, 53760.1, 53760.3, 53760.5, and 53760.7—and where, effective on the first day of this year, new statutory state language specifically created a first lien priority for general obligation debt issued by cities, counties, schools, and special districts, so long as the debt was secured by a levy of ad valorum taxes pursuant to California’s Constitution.) As we have noted, in the 18 states which authorize chapter 9 filings, states have proscribed strikingly different legal mechanisms relating to the state role—varying from a state takeover, such as we have described in the case of the nation’s largest municipal bankruptcy in Detroit, but to a very different regime in Jefferson County and San Bernardino—where the elected municipal officials not only remained in office, but here the respective states—if anything—contributed to the severity of the fiscal challenges. Then we turn to what might be Congress’ last day in town this year—and whether funding to help the City of Flint might be enacted: Will Congress pass and send to the President a bill to provide emergency assistance to Flint?

Back to a City’s Viable Future. San Bernardino leaders this week issued a detailed statement on the arduous road to recovery they have travelled and what they intend for the road ahead, albeit noting the city is already well along its own blueprint for its recovery, as it awaits formal approval from U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Meredith Jury from its chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy early next year. In its statement, San Bernardino reported it had implemented about 70 percent of its recovery plan. That’s turned once-dire projections for the future upside down—a virtual u-turn from when the city’s fiscal analysts three years ago projected that in FY2023, the city would have a deficit of $360 million if dramatic changes were not achieved. But today, the city instead projects an unallocated cash balance for FY2023 of $9.5 million, or, as the statement reads: “Now, the city is on the cusp of emerging from bankruptcy as a changed city with a brighter future.” The municipal statement is primarily focused on the governance and fiscal changes made to create a virtual u-turn in the city’s fiscal ship of state since entering what became the nation’s longest municipal bankruptcy—a change in fiscal course without either state aid or state imposition of an emergency manager or a state takeover. The statement notes: “Given the emergency nature of its filing, it took the city several months to assess its financial condition—until April 2013, at which time the city adopted a final budget for fiscal years 2012-13 and 2013-14…The city’s initial financial assessment, however, only reflected further concern over its financial future. In September 2013, Mayor [Pat] Morris announced that absent fundamental modernization and change the city faced a 10-year deficit of a staggering $360 million. The future of San Bernardino looked bleak.”

The statement itemized what appeared to be the key steps to recovery, including achieving labor agreements—agreements which resulted in savings in excess of $100 million, and involved the termination of virtually all health insurance subsidies coverage for employees and retirees, writing that the city calculated the resulting savings to amount to about $44 million for retirees and $51 million for current employees. The statement notes some $56 million in other OPEB changes. A key—and hard-fought change—was achieved by contracting out for essential public services, with one of the most hard fought such changes coming from the annexation agreement with the San Bernardino County Fire Protection District: an agreement under which the county assumed responsibility for fire and emergency medical response—a change projected to save San Bernardino’s budget nearly $66 million over the next two decades just in public pension savings, but also as much as $5 to $6 million in its annual operating budget—and that is before adding in the parcel tax revenues which were incorporated in that agreement. San Bernardino also switched to contracting out for its trash and recycling—an action with a one-time franchise payment of $5 million, but increased estimated annual revenues of approximately $5 million to $7.6 million. The switch led to significant alterations or contracting out for an increasing number of municipal services. Or, as the paper the city released notes: “Modern cities deliver many services via contracts with third-party providers, using competition to get the best terms and price for services…The city has entered into a number of such contracts under the Recovery Plan.”

Governance. The city paper writes that the voters’ approval of a new city charter will allow San Bernardino to eliminate ambiguous lines of authority which had created a lack of authority, or, as U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Meredith Jury put it earlier this week: “(City officials) successfully amended their charter, which will give them modern-day, real-life flexibility in making decisions that need to be made…There was too much political power and not enough management under their charter, to be frank, compared to most cities in California.”

Rechartering San Bernardino’s Public Security. San Bernardino’s Plan of Debt Adjustment calls for increasing investment into the Police Department through a five-year Police Plan—a key step, as a study commissioned to consider the city’s public safety found the city to be California’s most dangerous municipality based on crime, police presence, and other “community factors.” The study used FBI data and looked at crime rates, police presence, and investment in police departments as well as community factors including poverty, education, unemployment, and climate: The report found a high correlation between crime rates and poverty—with San Bernardino’s poverty rate topping 30.6 percent. Thus, in the city’s Police Plan portion of its plan of adjustment, the report notes:  “The Mayor, Common Council, and San Bernardino’s residents agree that crime is the most important issue the city faces,” the city says in the Police Plan, submitted to the federal bankruptcy court as part of its plan. The plan calls for $56 million over five years to add more police, update technology, and replace many of the Police Department’s aging vehicles.

The Cost of Fiscal Inattention. Unsurprisingly, the fiscal costs of bankruptcy for a city or county are staggering. The city estimates that the services of attorneys and consultants will cost at least $25 million by the time of the city’s projected formal emergence from chapter 9 next March—albeit those daunting costs are a fraction of the $350 million in savings achieved under the city’s pending plan of debt adjustment—savings created by the court’s approval of its plan to pay its creditors far less than they would have otherwise been entitled: as little as 1 cent on the dollar owed, in many instances. Or, as the city’s statement wryly notes: “In addition, the city’s bankruptcy has allowed the city a reprieve during which it was able to shore up its finances, find greater cost and organizational efficiencies and improve its governance functions…Thus, all told, while the city’s exit from bankruptcy will have been a hard-fought victory, it was one that was critical and necessary to the city’s continued viability for the future.”

Out Like Flint. The House of Representatives on what it hopes to be its penultimate day yesterday approved two bills which, together, would authorize and fund $170 million for emergency aid to Flint and other communities endangered by contaminated drinking water. The emergency assistance came by way of a stopgap spending bill to keep the federal government operating next April in a bipartisan 326-96 vote and, separately, a water infrastructure bill which directs how the $170 million package should be spent by a 360-61 vote. Nevertheless, the aid for the city is not certain in the U.S. Senate: some have vowed to stop it, at least in part because the bill includes a controversial drought provision which would boost water deliveries to the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California.