TheExceptional Governing Challenges on Roads to Fiscal Recovery

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eBlog, 12/02/16

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the hard role to recovery not just from San Bernardino’s longest-ever municipal bankruptcy, but also the savage terrorist attack a year ago. Then we venture East to observe the evolving state role in New Jersey’s takeover of Atlantic City, where the new designee named by Gov. Chris Christie, Jeffrey Chiesa, yesterday introduced himself to residents and taxpayers, but offered little guidance about exactly how he will usurp the roles of the Mayor and City Council in governing and trying to get the famed boardwalk city out of insolvency and back to fiscal stability. Finally, we look north to the metropolitan Hartford, Connecticut region, where the municipalities in the region are seeking to work out fiscal mechanisms to address Hartford’s potential municipal bankruptcy in order to ensure no disruption of metropolitan water and sewer services—a different, but in this case critical element of a “sharing economy.”  

The Jagged Road to Chapter 9 Recovery. It was one year ago today that terrorists struck in San Bernardino—the city in chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy longer than any other city in U.S. history, marking, then, a day of 14 deaths—with victims caught in the crossfire of gun shots and carnage in the wake of the wanton attack by Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik—and a horror still not over, as it will be another nine months before the trial against Enrique Marquez Jr., who has been charged with buying some of the weapons which were used in the attack, commences in September—months after the beleaguered city anticipates exiting from bankruptcy. Because the shootings took place at a San Bernardino County facility in San Bernardino, the long-term recovery has been further complicated from a governance perspective: many of the shooting survivors are accusing San Bernardino County of cutting off much-needed support for the survivors of the attack, including refusing to approve counseling or antidepressant medication. Others, who were physically wounded are seeking, so far unsuccessfully, to get surgeries and physical therapy covered. The San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors earlier this week convened a closed-door session at which survivors said they felt betrayed and abandoned, left to deal with California’s complicated workers’ compensation program without guidance or help. Their health insurers will not cover their injuries because they occurred in a workplace attack. Congressman Pete Aguilar (D-Ca.), whose district includes San Bernardino, reports that his hometown had been added to a list of cities with which people are familiar for a terrible reason, such as Littleton, Colo., or Newtown, Conn. Nevertheless, he is defiant, insisting “We will not be defined by this tragedy.”

However, murder rates in the city have been climbing: the city of just over 200,000 is grappling with a spike in violent crime, homicides especially: to date, this year, the city has reported 49 killings, already more than last year’s total, which included the terrorist victims—its homicide rate tops that of Chicago, which has become the poster child for big-city violent crime and is on pace for more than 600 killings this year. San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan, however, said the crime wave is not unique to the chapter 9 municipality—a currently bankrupt city where empty storefronts and pawn shops have long lined downtown streets. Nevertheless, Brian Levin, a criminal justice professor at California State University, San Bernardino, who studies hate crimes, yesterday noted: “we’re a better community now, even though we’re hurt.” Professor Levin is one who, in the days and weeks which ensued after the mass tragedy, met with faith leaders, law enforcement, and families of the victims—where he discovered a unity of shock and shared pain. Today, he notes: “The attack will always be a part of our history…But here’s the thing: so will the heroics of those police officers and first responders and medical staff, and so will the grace of the families. We’re writing the rest of the history. The bastards lost.” Now the city awaits early next year for emerging not just from the physical tragedy, but also the longest chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy ever.  

Atlantic City Blues.  Jeffrey Chiesa, a former New Jersey Attorney General, U.S. Senator, and, now, Governor Chris Christie’s designee to run the state takeover of Atlantic City, yesterday introduced himself at a City Council meeting and took questions from city taxpayers and residents. He provided, however, in this first public meeting no details on plans to address either the city’s fiscal plight—or its interim governance. He reported the State of New Jersey does not yet have a plan to address the city’s $100 million budget hole, much less to pay down the Atlantic City’s $500 million debt, noting: “It has been two weeks…My plan is to do what I think is necessary to create a structural financial situation that works not for six months, not for a year, but indefinitely so that this place can flourish in a way that it deserves to flourish.” He noted he and his law firm will be paid hourly for their work, albeit he did not report what that hourly rate will be—especially as the state retention agreement remains incomplete, albeit promising: “We’ll make sure that’s available once it’s been finalized.” Related to governance, he noted that—related to his state-granted authority to sell city assets, hire or fire workers or break union contracts, among other powers—he would listen to residents and stakeholders before making major decisions: “What this designation has done is consolidate authority, per the legislation, in the designee to make those decisions…That does not mean that I’m not listening. That does not mean I’m pretending I have all the answers without consulting with other people.” Describing the seaside city as a “jewel” and “truly unique,” he added that he understood concerns about an outsider overseeing the city: “I know that most of you don’t know who I am…All I can do is be judged by my actions and the decision that I make, and I hope you give me time to do that.” He did say that he would have to move swiftly to address immediate issues, likely referring to reaching agreements with casinos to make payments in lieu of property taxes, and then focusing on the city’s expenses—noting: “That timeframe is pretty compressed…So we will take the steps we need to take.”

Fiscally Hard for Hartford. As we have recounted in the fiscally strapped municipality of Petersburg, Virginia, municipal fiscal insolvency cannot occur in a geographic vacuum: whether in Detroit—or as we note above today, in San Bernardino, fiscal insolvency has repercussions for adjacent municipalities. So too in Hartford, the Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) completed its planned $173 million municipal bond sale late last week, temporarily ending the controversy over a $5.5 million reserve fund. Under the provisions, that fund would be paid by seven of the eight MDC municipalities to cover the sewage fee for the second half of 2017 if the City of Hartford is unable to contribute its share, as it has indicated it will be unable to do. Ergo, it means that adjacent Windsor, the first English settlement in the state which abuts Hartford on its northern border, with a population of under 30,000 would contribute over $700,000, with East Hartford contributing about $900,000. The other group members in the metro region, Bloomfield, Newington, Rocky Hill, West Hartford, and Wethersfield, would pay the remaining $900,000, proportionately. One outcome of this watery alliance and experience is that the MDC will, when the state legislature convenes next February, propose two laws to avoid the necessity for a reserve fund in the future, with MDC Chairman William DiBella suggesting that the eight member municipalities be required to set aside as untouchable the percentage of their property taxes the cities and towns already know they will owe to the MDC for sewage services. (Currently, property taxes go into the municipalities’ general funds, and the cities extract the sewage fee when it is due, provided the funds are, in fact, available; however, like water at the tap, that has not always been the experience.) In effect, the consortium is recommending a selves-imposed budgeting municipal mandate, with Chairman DiBella noting: “Every town would have to do it. That way, one town can’t stiff us. You wouldn’t have to go out and borrow money or take charity and hope you get it back.” As the Chairman noted: “We never had a problem like this…Who thought a town would go bankrupt? With the proposed law, if a town were to go bankrupt, the sewage fund would be in a dedicated account and can’t be reached,” or touched in a bankruptcy proceeding. Another potential resolution would be to allow the MDC to borrow money over a long-term for operating expenses. The MDC would then be able to pay Hartford’s $5.5 million bill and look for a city reimbursement in other ways.

There has been increased pressure for a resolution—especially in the wake of municipal bond holders of the MDC, holders who, last week, made clear to the authority they would not buy its municipal bonds if a reserve fund was not put into place. That appeared to be a key incentive for the board’s action earlier this week for the MDC board, including representatives of all eight municipal members, to vote unanimously to adopt the water and sewer service provider’s 2017 budget, which contains the unwelcome “bail-out” fund for Hartford—albeit Chair DiBella said there would be no guarantee the agency could cover a Hartford default or continue operating or pay the bondholders. A key part of the incentive to try to work together relates to potential fiscal contagion: because of concerns over Hartford’s finances and fiscal condition, credit rating agencies have recently downgraded MDC’s bond rating from AA+ to AA, a downgrade expected to cost the agency and its member towns an estimated $500,000 in a higher interest rate for the bonds. The towns, unsurprisingly, are apprehensive the credit rating agencies will now consider changing their credit ratings. In contrast, creating the reserve fund would keep MDC’s credit rating where it is: thus, MDC officials hope that passing the two proposed laws would prompt the credit rating agencies to return its rating to AA+.

 

Monitoring Municipal Fiscal Stress

eBlog, 11/17/16

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the evolving state takeover of Atlantic City, with the appointment by the state of what Mayor Don Guardian deemed the “occupation force.” We consider the role of the state and mechanisms for a state takeover—as well as the options for the municipality. Then we look west to an innovative state-local tax collection sharing effort between the State of Michigan and City of Detroit—mayhap appropriate in the emerging sharing economy; then west where, in the wake of municipal elections in post-chapter 9 Stockton, the newly elected Mayor begins thinking about the city’s further post municipal bankruptcy fiscal future. Then we swing back southeast to the historic small city of Petersburg, Virginia—where a private team has been hired to try to pilot the city—and the region—out of near insolvency. Then we look north, to the land of the incomparable Don Boyd of the Rockefeller Institute, who yesterday was a host to a fascinating session with New York Assistant Comptroller Tracey Hitchen Boyd who discussed with us the Empire State’s “groundbreaking Fiscal Stress Monitoring System to identify local governments and school districts experiencing financial strain.” Finally, with winter beginning to bite, we seek warmth in the Caribbean, venturing back to Puerto Rico, where the Puerto Rico Oversight Board created under the new PROMESA law preps for its meeting tomorrow—a meeting that will come during transition periods of administrations both in the federal and Puerto Rican governments—adding still greater challenges to the U.S. territory’s transition.

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State Preemption of a Municipality? The twilight period during which Atlantic City has awaited its state takeover now appears to be over, or, as Mayor Don Guardian posed it, the “occupation force” of a “governor we don’t like” has been named. New Jersey has tasked Jeffrey Chiesa, a longtime ally and associate of Gov. Chris Christie—indeed, an associate the Governor once named to fill in as one of the state’s U.S. Senators in the wake of the death of former U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg, and who also served as New Jersey’s Attorney General, to serve as the “director’s designee” to execute the state takeover of Atlantic City, from which position he will report to New Jersey’s Department of Community Affairs, under the leadership of Tim Cunningham, the Director of New Jersey’s Local Finance Board. In this new capacity, Mr. Chiesa will have far-reaching powers, including the authority to unilaterally hire, fire, eliminate departments and authorities, sell assets, terminate union contracts, and veto any action by City Council, according to the state’s Municipal Stabilization and Recovery Act. In its release, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs said Mr. Chiesa would use his authority “judiciously.”

In the statement, Mr. Chiesa said: “It is my hope to work together with firm conviction and not disrupt the democratic process…I am committed to improving essential government and community services for the people of the Atlantic City…“I will listen to the people and work hand in hand with local stakeholders to create solutions that will prevent waste and relieve generations of taxpayers from the burden of long-term debt. We will put Atlantic City back on a path to fiscal stability.”

With regard to governance, the Department said Atlantic City Mayor and City Council will “maintain day-to-day municipal functions.”  Mr. Chiesa’s role will be to oversee “fiscal recovery efforts, ” with the release from the Department noting his immediate steps would include entering into PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes) agreements with casinos, ensuring that debt service and county and school payments are made on time, in addition to exploring “right-sizing the City’s work force.” What and how Atlantic City’s elected government leaders will do—and what they may do could now be the outcome of the third branch of the state’s government: the courts, especially in the wake of Mayor Guardian’s making clear yesterday that the city was poised to go to court to block any actions by the state that it regards as civil rights violations. Early yesterday, Mayor Guardian said the city would go to court if the state takes actions “we see as unconstitutional.”

The road ahead promises to be steep: the state takeover comes with the Governor potentially leaving to join the new Trump Administration; Atlantic City has a roughly $100 million annual budget deficit and about $500 million in total debt. The city’s ratable base has declined from $20 billion in 2010 to $6 billion today as the casino town faced more competition in neighboring states: five of the city’s famed boardwalk casinos have closed since 2014—with significant implications for unemployment, per capita income, and assessed property values.

State Preemption. In the wake of last week’s state Local Finance Board vote to usurp major decision-making powers from Atlantic City’s elected leaders week, Local Government Services Director Timothy Cunningham noted: “The simple fact is Atlantic City cannot afford to function the way it has in the past…I look forward to meeting with Mayor Guardian and members of the City Council and starting the process of bringing this great city back to financial stability. It is my hope to work together with firm conviction and not disrupt the democratic process.”

As we have previously noted, the Board’s vote for the takeover came in the wake of the state Department of Community Affairs Commissioner Charles Richman rejecting the city’s fiscal-recovery plan last week—a plan which the Department criticized, because it failed to balance the city’s 2017 budget, ran a five-year shortfall of $106 million, and did not accurately estimate cost and revenue projections. In addition, the Department expressed concerns over the Bader (airport) Field sale, calling the water authority’s plan to issue $126 million in low-interest, long-term bonds to pay for the land “dubious at best.”

The Sharing Economy? The State of Michigan Tuesday committed to begin processing Detroit city business tax returns for the first time next January, enhancing a state-local partnership between the Motor City and the Michigan Department of Treasury that began last year with individual income tax returns and which will extend to business returns starting with the 2016 tax year. Under the new partnership, any business required to withhold city income taxes and any taxpayer who files under Detroit’s corporate partnership and fiduciary rules will be affected by the change: it will allow corporate filers to electronically submit their returns and use other online department services. In addition, partnership and fiduciary filers will submit their returns to the Treasury Department. As part of the reforms, the State’s handling of individual tax returns will allow filers to electronically submit both city and state returns. (Detroit residents pay a 2.4 percent individual income tax rate, while nonresidents pay a 1.2 percent rate. Detroit’s business income tax rate is 2 percent.)

Taking Stock in Stockton. In his first public comments since last week’s election, Mayor Anthony Silva this week said “the hate and the political battles” must end “if Stockton is truly going to heal and move forward.” Noting that: “Stockton is still a divided city,” the new Mayor said: “We have a new mayor, and he is now my mayor.” The outgoing Mayor spoke for five minutes at this week’s City Council meeting, the first such meeting since his lopsided loss last week to City Councilman Michael Tubbs. He graciously added: “I would expect anyone out there who claims to be my friend or one of my supporters not to participate in any sort of hate against the new mayor and to allow him the opportunity to lead.” (Mayor-elect Tubbs will take office January 1st.) Mayor Silva added: “I want you to pray and root for his success. Mayor-elect Tubbs, you have my support and you have my commitment for a smooth transition during the next month and a half. Congratulations.” The Mayor-elect did not refer to the outgoing Mayor’s comments during his own public remarks; rather he said Stockton has much to be grateful for as Thanksgiving approaches, referring especially to voters’ approval in the election of a one-quarter-cent sales and use tax to benefit Stockton’s library and recreation services: “Think of the gifts the voters gave us…That shows me that the residents in the city of Stockton are ready to get to work, that they want to be part of the solution. I think that bodes well for us at the end of this year as we move forward to next year.” (The Mayor-elect won his election by a 70-30 margin.) He added: “In Stockton, we love diversity. We don’t tolerate bigotry. If you’re LGBT, if you’re Muslim, if you’re undocumented, if you’re documented, if you’re immigrant, Stockton is your home, we love you, you’re part of our community.” Outgoing Mayor Silva noted that he had sent a text message to Councilmember Tubbs immediately after the election, and added that the two had “a great meeting” post-election meeting—a meeting he noted which “was important…because four years ago I never got a text message or a phone call or an email from my opponent (then-Mayor Ann Johnston), and then when I reached out to her I still never got one.” He added: “I would never wish this same action upon anyone, and Mayor-elect Tubbs and the new City Council do not deserve this type of hate, either.”

Addressing Municipal Dysfunction. Robert Bobb, the former Richmond, Virginia city manager whose consulting team has been hired on for hundreds of thousands of dollars by the nearly insolvent small, but historic city of Petersburg, Virginia told the City Council this week “There’s a lot of work to do, a lot of clean-up to do. We’re at it every day…There are a lot of dedicated people here who are working hard to help us.” Nevertheless, the challenge is significant: Mr. Bobb estimated the city has just $78,000 in cash in the wake of a debt payment due; yet it confronts critical payments to select vendors; a mandatory $427,000 payment to the school system; and tomorrow’s payroll—and that is after an unexpected fiscal gift: some $1.3 million that the team was able to scrounge up working with the administration of Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe and the Virginia Resources Authority from unused municipal bonds dating back to 2013. The challenge is made greater, moreover, in a city where nearly half the city’s children are estimated to live below the federal poverty line, according to U.S. Census data. Mr. Bobb also warned the Council that he remains unable to ascertain how much of the $18 million backlog in past-due bills the city owes that Virginia state officials identified over the summer has been resolved. About $10 million in accounts payable bills remain outstanding; however, there are many other categories of expenses. Moreover, as Nelsie Birch, Petersburg’s deputy interim City Manager and acting Finance Director noted: “That’s only for bills we’ve received,” adding that as of earlier this week there was more than $1 million in the city’s checking account, but “it’s more than spoken for,” noting that payroll costs about $1 million every two weeks. Unsurprisingly, the Council voted unanimously to allow the city manager to make the moves necessary to secure the funding. In addition, the Council authorized acting City Manager to move forward and secure $6.5 million in short-term financing to help Petersburg remain operating through the end of the year, with part of those funds to go toward a lump-sum payment of $1.2 million due by mid-December to help settle a lawsuit filed against the city by the regional South Central Wastewater Authority—where the municipality has been delinquent since last May, threatening the budgets of the other municipalities in its region. Petersburg has agreed to address its outstanding balance within two years, according to the statement, albeit how it will do so is something which remains to be resolved.

Good Gnus, Bad Gnus. Mr. Bobb advised the Council that his team’s fiscal analysis had, to date, discovered both good and bad news: in the latter category, among the most disappointing findings, they determined that a $92,000 cut made this year to the city’s Department of Social Services had triggered a loss of $600,000 in state funds needed to help Petersburg’s most vulnerable residents—especially its children. On the good gnus side, he told them that the dismissal of the South Central region’s lawsuit would clear the path for the city to move forward with short-term solutions that would offer his group the time and space to implement long-term plans to move the city back towards solvency, noting that the city, for the first time since the beginning of the fiscal year, had posted its current fiscal year budget online. However, he also reported that it was not just the city’s taxpayers who had been left in the fiscal dark in recent months: the municipality’s department heads had been operating without spending plans revised to address the $12 million in cuts made by the City Council last September to balance the budget for the first time in nearly a decade. The report, however, also advised Councilmembers that the City Council had voted to approve road projects Petersburg could not afford and that the city’s decentralized system of paying for goods and services was such that finance workers hoping to avoid further overspending could not see what resources had been committed until the office received an invoice. That meant, the team reported to the elected leaders, Petersburg will need to defer some past priorities, including postponing some utility upgrades such as water tank upgrades and overhauling sewage main and lines; museum and golf course upgrades; replacing City Hall; and planned work on other city facilities.

Early Fiscal Storm Warnings. New York Assistant Comptroller Tracey Hitchen Boyd this week, in a communication to New York local elected leaders, wrote that since the state, three years ago, had implemented a “groundbreaking Fiscal Stress Monitoring System to identify local governments and school districts experiencing financial strain,” the state had received suggestions from local leaders on ways to enhance that system, so that the state has opened a comment period to enhance the state’s ability to provide an early fiscal warning to local leaders in order to provide an opportunity to take corrective actions. The program, now in its fourth year, aims to provide an early warning of fiscal problems to local officials and citizens so that corrective actions can be taken before a true financial crisis occurs. The state is completing its fourth year of such reviews, evaluating every city, county, town, village, and school district based on a series of standard financial indicators. Each entity is scored annually to determine if, according to the measures, it falls within one of three levels of fiscal stress. The System also evaluates the general environmental factors affecting municipalities, or, as Ms. Boyd wrote: “We are completing our fourth year of FSMS reviews, evaluating every city, county, town, village, and school district based on a series of standard financial indicators. Each entity is scored annually to determine if, according to the measures, they are in one of three levels of fiscal stress. The System also evaluates the general environmental factors affecting municipalities.”

Federal Preemption. The Puerto Rico Oversight Board has scheduled its first session in Puerto Rico for tomorrow, with the meeting set outside of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. While the session will be by invitation only, it is scheduled to be streamed online at www.oversightboard.pr.gov, and to be followed by a press conference. It follows two earlier meetings convened in New York City. At this week’s session, the agenda includes a presentation by Conway MacKenzie Inc. on the government’s liquidity; a presentation by the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority; public testimony on Puerto Rico’s proposed fiscal plan; and the creation of procedures to approve transactions of the board’s “covered entities.” The session comes as the U.S. territory confronts a $3 billion cash shortfall in its current fiscal year—having disclosed that sum yesterday as part of its report it will be presenting to the PROMESA Board tomorrow—with that tidy sum coming due next February—assuming that would be the proximate date of the lifting of the current debt payment moratorium, but also optimistically assumes Puerto Rico will not have reached agreements with its creditors by that date: the tidy sum, after all, represents nearly 33% of Puerto Rico’s current approved fiscal year budget. Moreover, the island faces some $2.2 billion in municipal bond debt service between then and the end of its fiscal year—not to mention some nearly $850 million in unpaid municipal debt service. The territory’s government has sought to address its growing financial crisis via any number of avenues, including the deferral of payments to suppliers and the deferral of tax payments; however, it is running out of fiscal options.

What Is a State’s Role in Averting Municipal Fiscal Contagion?

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eBlog, 9/28/16

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider, again, the risk of municipal fiscal contagion—and what the critical role of a state might be as the small municipality of Petersburg, Virginia’s fiscal plight appears to threaten neighboring municipalities and utilities: Virginia currently lacks a clearly defined legal or legislated route to address not just insolvency, but also to avoid the spread of fiscal contagion. Nor does the state appear to have any policy to enhance the ability of its cities to fiscally strengthen themselves. Then we try to go to school in Detroit—where the state almost seems intent on micromanaging the city’s public and charter schools so critical to the city’s long-term fiscal future. Then we jet to O’Hare to consider an exceptionally insightful report raising our age-old question with regard to: are there too many municipalities in a region? Since we’re there, we then look at the eroding fiscal plight of Cook County’s largest municipality: Chicago, a city increasingly caught between the fiscal plights of its public schools and public pension liabilities.  From thence we go up the river to Flint, where Congressional action last night might promise some fiscal hope—before, finally, ending this morn’s long journey in East Cleveland—where a weary Mayor continues to await a response from the State of Ohio—making the wait for Godot seem impossibly short—and the non-response from the State increasingly irresponsible.

Where Was Virginia While Petersburg Was Fiscally Collapsing? President Obama yesterday helicoptered into Fort Lee, just 4.3 miles from the fiscally at risk municipality of Petersburg, in a region where Petersburg’s regional partners are wondering whether they will ever be reimbursed for delinquent bills: current regional partners to which the city owes money include the South Central Wastewater Authority, Appomattox River Water Authority, Central Virginia Waste Management, Riverside Regional Jail, Crater Criminal Justice Academy, and Crater Youth Care Commission. Acting City Manager Dironna Moore Belton has apparently advised these authorities to expect a partial payment in October—or as a spokesperson of a law firm yesterday stated: “The City appears committed to meeting its financial obligations for these important and necessary services going forward and to starting to pay down past due amounts dating back to the 2016 fiscal year…We appreciate the plan the city presented; however we have to reserve judgment until we see whether the City follows through on these commitments.” One option, it appears, alluded to by the Acting City Manager would be via a tax anticipation note. Given the municipality’s virtual insolvency, however, such additional borrowing would likely come at a frightful cost.

The municipality is caught in a fiscal void. It appears to have totally botched the rollout of new water meters intended to reduce leakage and facilitate more efficient billing. It appears to be insolvent—and imperiling the fiscal welfare of other municipalities and public utilities in its region. It appears the city has been guilty of charges that when it did collect water bills, it diverted funds toward other activities and failed to remit to the water authority. While it seems the city has paid the Virginia Resources Authority to stave off default, questions have arisen with regard to the role of the Commonwealth of Virginia—one of the majority of states which does not permit municipalities to file for chapter 9 bankruptcy. But questions have also arisen with regard to what role—or lack of a role—the state has played over the last two fiscal years, years in which the city’s auditor has given it a clean signoff on its CAFRs; and GFOA awarded the city its award for financial reporting. There is, of course, also the bedeviling query: if Virginia law does not permit localities to go into municipal bankruptcy, and if Petersburg’s insolvency threatens the fiscal solvency of a public regional utility and, potentially, other regional municipalities, what is the state role and responsibility—a state, after all, which rightly is apprehensive that is its coveted AAA credit rating could be at risk were Petersburg to become insolvent.

In this case, it seems that Petersburg passed the Virginia State Auditor’s scrutiny because (1) it submitted the required documents according to the state’s schedule, regardless of whether or not the numbers were correct; (2) the firm used by the city was probably out of its league. (It appears Petersburg used a firm that specialized in small town audits); (3) the City Council apparently did not focus on material weaknesses identified by the private CPA (nor did the State Auditor). The previous city manager, by design, accident, or level of competence, simply did not put up much of a struggle when the Council would amend the budget in mid-year to increase spending—a task no doubt politically challenging in the wake of the Great Recession—a fiscal slam which, according to the State Auditor’s presentation, devastated the city’s finances, forcing the city in a posture of surviving off cash reserves. (http://sfc.virginia.gov/pdf/committee_meeting_presentations/2016%20Interim/092216_No2b_Mavredes_SFC%20Locality%20Fiscal%20Indicators%20Overview.pdf). Now, in the wake of fiscal failures at both levels of government, the Virginia Senate Finance Committee last week devoted a great deal of time discussing “early warning systems,” or fiscal distress trip wires which would alert a state early on of impending municipal fiscal distress. Currently, in Virginia, no state agency has the responsibility for such an activity. That augurs ill: it means the real question is: is Petersburg an anomaly or the beginning of a trend?

The challenge for the state—because its credit rating could be adversely affected if it fails to act, and Petersburg’s fiscal contagion spreads to its regional neighbors and public utilities, a larger question for the Governor and legislators might be with regard to the state’s strictures in Virginia which bar municipal bankruptcy, bar annexation, prohibit local income taxes, cap local sales tax, and have been increasing state-driven costs for K-12, line-of-duty, water and wastewater, etc.

Who’s Governing a City’ Future? Michigan Attorney General Bill Scheutte yesterday stated the state would close poorly performing Detroit schools by the end of the current academic year if they ranked among the state’s worst in the past three years in an official legal opinion—an opinion contradictory to a third-party legal analysis that Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration had said would prevent the state from forcing closure any Detroit public schools until at least 2019, because they had been transferred to a new debt-free district as part of a financial rescue package legislators approved this year—a state law which empowers the School Reform Office authority to close public schools which perform in the lowest five percent for three consecutive years. Indeed, in his opinion, Attorney General Scheutte wrote that enabling the state’s $617 million district bailout specified Detroit closures should be mandatory unless such closures would result in an unreasonable hardship for students, writing: “The law is clear: Michigan parents and their children do not have to be stuck indefinitely in a failing school…Detroit students and parents deserve accountability and high performing schools. If a child can’t spell opportunity, they won’t have opportunity.” The Attorney General’s opinion came in response to a request by Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof (R-West Olive) and House Speaker Kevin Cotter (R-Mount Pleasant) as part of the issue with regard to whether the majority in the state legislature, the City of Detroit, or the Detroit Public Schools ought to be guiding DPS, currently under Emergency Manager retired U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes would best serve the interest of the city’s children. It appears, at least from the perspective of the state capitol, this will be a decision preempted by the state, with the Governor’s School Reform Office seemingly likely to ultimately decide whether to close any number of struggling schools around the state—a decision his administration has said would likely be made—even as the school year is already underway—“a couple of months” away. The state office last month released a list of 124 schools that performed in the bottom 5 percent last year, on which list more than a third, 47, were Detroit schools.

Nevertheless, the governance authority to so disrupt a city’s public school system is hardly clear: John Walsh, Gov. Snyder’s director of strategic policy, had told The Detroit News that the state could not immediately close any Detroit schools, citing an August 2nd legal memorandum Miller Canfield attorneys sent Detroit school district emergency manager Judge Rhodes, a memorandum which made clear that the transferral of Detroit schools to a new-debt free district under the provisions of the state-enacted legislation had essentially reset the three-year countdown clock allowing the state to close them—a legal position the state attorney general yesterday rejected, writing: a school “need not be operated by the community district for the immediately preceding three school years before it is subject to closure.” Michigan State Rep. Sherry Gay-Dagnogo (D-Detroit) reacted to the state opinion by noting it would not give Detroit’s schools a chance to make serious improvements as part of so-called “fresh start” promised by the legislature as part of the $617 million school reform package enacted last June, noting that she believes the timing of its release—just one week before student count day—is part of an intentional effort to destabilize the district: “We could possibly lose students, because parents are afraid and confused, that’s what this is all about…They want the district to implode…They want to completely remake public education, and implode the district to charter the district. There’s big money in charter schools…This is about business over children.”

Are There Too Many Municipalities? Can We Afford Them All? The Chicago Civic Federation recently released a report, “Unincorporated Cook County: A Profile of Unincorporated Areas in Cook County and Recommendations to Facilitate Incorporation,” which examines unincorporated areas in Cook County—a county with a population larger than that of 29 individual states—and the combined populations of the seven smallest states—a county in which there are some 135 incorporated municipalities partially or wholly within the county, the largest of which is the City of Chicago, home to approximately 54% of the population of the county. Approximately 2.4%, or 126,034, of Cook County’s 5.2 million residents live in unincorporated areas of the County and therefore do not pay taxes to a municipality. According to Civic Federation calculations, Cook County spends approximately $42.9 million annually in expenses related to the delivery of municipal-type services to unincorporated areas, including law enforcement, building and zoning and liquor control. Because the areas only generate $24.0 million toward defraying the cost of these special services, County taxpayers effectively pay an $18.9 million subsidy, even as they pay taxes for their own municipal services. The portion of Cook County which lies outside Chicago’s city limits is divided into 30 townships, which often divide or share governmental services with local municipalities. Thus, this new report builds on the long-term effort by the Federation in the wake of its 2014 comprehensive analysis of all unincorporated areas in Cook County as well as recommendations to assist the County in eliminating unincorporated areas. .In this new report, the Federation looks at the $18.9 million cost to the County of providing municipal-type services in unincorporated areas compared to revenue generated from the unincorporated areas, finding it spent approximately $18.9 million more on unincorporated area services than the total revenue it collected in those areas in FY2014, including nearly $24.0 million in revenues generated from the unincorporated areas of the county compared to $42.9 million in expenses related to the delivery of municipal-type services to the unincorporated areas of the county—or, as the report notes: “In sum, all Cook County taxpayers provide an $18.9 million subsidy to residents in the unincorporated areas. On a per capita basis, the variance between revenues and expenditures is $150, or the difference between $340 per capita in expenditures versus $190 per capita in revenues collected. The report found that in that fiscal year, Cook County’s cost to provide law enforcement, building and zoning, animal control and liquor control services was approximately $42.9 million or $340.49 per resident of the unincorporated areas. The following chart identifies the Cook County agencies that provide services to the unincorporated areas and the costs associated with providing those services. The county’s services to these unincorporated areas are funded through a variety of taxes and fees, including revenues generated from both incorporated and unincorporated taxpayers to fund operations countywide: some revenues are generated or are distributed solely within the unincorporated areas, such as income taxes, building and zoning fees, state sales taxes, wheel taxes (the wheel tax is an annual license fee authorizing the use of any motor vehicle within the unincorporated area of Cook County). The annual rate varies depending on the type of vehicle as well as a vehicle’s class, weight, and number of axles. Receipts from this tax are deposited in the Public Safety Fund. In FY2014 the tax generated an estimated $3.8 million., and business and liquor license fees, but the report found these areas also generated revenues from the Cook County sales and property taxes, which totaled nearly $15.5 million in revenue, noting, however, those taxes are imposed at the same rate in both incorporated and unincorporated areas and are used to fund all county functions. With regard to revenues generated solely within the unincorporated areas of the county, the Federation wrote that the State of Illinois allocates income tax funds to Cook County based on the number of residents in unincorporated areas: if unincorporated areas are annexed to municipalities, then the distribution of funds is correspondingly reduced by the number of inhabitants annexed into municipalities. Thus, in FY2014, Cook County collected approximately $12.0 million in income tax distribution based on the population of residents residing in the unincorporated areas of Cook County. The report determined the Wheel Tax garnered an estimated $3.8 million in FY2014 from the unincorporated areas; $3.7 million from permit and zoning fees (including a contractor’s business registration fee, annual inspection fees, and local public entity and non-profit organization fees (As of December 1, 2014, all organizations are required to pay 100% of standard building, zoning and inspection fees.). The County receives a cut of the Illinois Retailer’s Occupation Tax (a tax on the sale of certain merchandise at the rate of 6.25%. Of the 6.25%, 1.0% of the 6.25% is distributed to Cook County for sales made in the unincorporated areas of the County. In FY2014 this amounted to approximately $2.8 million in revenue. However, if the unincorporated areas of Cook County are annexed by a municipality this revenue would be redirected to the municipalities that annexed the unincorporated areas.) Cook County also receives a fee from cable television providers for the right and franchise to construct and operate cable television systems in unincorporated Cook County (which garnered nearly $1.3 million in revenue in FY2104). Businesses located in unincorporated Cook County pay an annual fee in order to obtain a liquor license that allows for the sale of alcoholic liquor. The minimum required license fee is $3,000 plus additional background check fees and other related liquor license application fees. In FY2014 these fees generated $365,904. Finally, businesses in unincorporated Cook County engaged in general sales, involved in office operations, or not exempt are required to obtain a Cook County general business license—for which a fee of $40 for a two-year license is imposed—enough in FY2014 for the county to count approximately $32,160 in revenue.

Who’s Financing a City’s Future? It almost seems as if the largest municipality within Cook County is caught between its past and its future—here it is accrued public pension liabilities versus its public schools. The city has raised taxes and moved to shore up its debt-ridden pension system—obligated by the Illinois constitution to pay, but under further pressure and facing a potential strike by its teachers, who are seeking greater benefits. The Chicago arithmetic for the public schools, the nation’s third-largest public school district is an equation which counts on the missing variables of state aid and union concessions—neither of which appears to be forthcoming. Indeed, this week, Moody’s, doing its own moody math, cut the Big Shoulder city’s credit rating deeper into junk, citing its “precarious liquidity” and reliance on borrowed money, even as preliminary data demonstrated a continuing enrollment decline drop of almost 14,000 students—a decline that will add fiscal insult to injury and, likely, provoke potential investors to insist upon higher interest rates. According to the Chicago Board of Education, enrollment has eroded from some 414,000 students in 2007 to 396,000 last year: a double whammy, because it not only reduces its funding, but likely also means the Mayor’s goal of drawing younger families to move into the city might not be working. In our report on Chicago, we had noted: “The demographics are recovering from the previous decade which saw an exodus of 200,000. In the decade, the city lost 7.1% of its jobs. Now, revenues are coming back, but the city faces an exceptional challenge in trying to shape its future. With a current debt level of $63,525 per capita, one expert noted that if one included the debt per capita with the unfunded liability per capita, the city would be a prime “candidate for fiscal distress.” Nevertheless, unemployment is coming down (11.3% unemployment, seasonally adjusted) and census data demonstrated the city is returning as a destination for the key demographic group, the 25-29 age group, which grew from 227,000 in 2006 to 274,000 by end of 2011.) Ergo, the steady drop in enrollment could signal a reversal of those once “recovering” demographics. Or, as Moody’s notes, the chronic financial strains may lead investors to demand higher interest rates—rates already unaffordably high with yields of as much as 9 percent, according to Moody’s. Like an olden times Pac-Man, principal and interest rate costs are chewing into CPS’s budget consuming more than 10 percent of this year’s $5.4 billion budget, or as the ever perspicacious Richard Ciccarone of Merritt Research Services in the Windy City put it: “To say that they’re challenged is an understatement…The problems that they’re having poses risks to continued operations and the timely repayment of liabilities.” Moody’s VP in Chicago Rachel Cortez notes: “Because the reserves and the liquidity have weakened steadily over the past few years, there’s less room for uncertainty in the budget: They don’t have any cash left to buffer against revenue or expenditure assumptions that don’t pan out.” And the math threatens to worsen: CPS’ budget for FY2016-17 anticipate the school district will gain concessions from the union, including phasing out CPS’ practice of covering most of teachers’ pension contributions—a phase-out the teachers’ union has already rejected; CPS is also counting on $215 million in aid contingent on Illinois adopting a pension overhaul—the kind of math made virtually impossible under the state’s constitution, r, as Moody’s would put it: an “unrealistic expectations.” Even though lawmakers approved a $250 million property-tax levy for teachers’ pensions, those funds will not be forthcoming until after the end of the fiscal year—and they will barely make a dent in CPS’s $10 billion in unfunded retirement liabilities.

Out Like Flint. The City of Flint will continue to receive its water from the Great Lakes Water Authority for another year, time presumed to be sufficient to construct a newly required stretch of pipeline and allow for testing of water Flint will treat from its new source, the Karegnondi Water Authority (KWA). The decision came as the Senate, in its race to leave Washington, D.C. yesterday, passed legislation to appropriate some $170 million—but funds which would only actually be available and finally acted upon in December when Congress is scheduled to come back from two months’ of recess—after the House of Representatives adopted an amendment to a water projects bill, the Water Resources Development Act, which would authorize—but not appropriate—the funds for communities such as Flint where the president has declared a state of emergency because of contaminants like lead. Meanwhile, the Michigan Strategic Fund, an arm of the Michigan Economic Development Corp., Tuesday approved a loan of up to $3.5 million to help Flint finance the $7.5-million pipeline the EPA is requiring to allow treated KWA water to be tested for six months before it is piped to Flint residents to drink. While the pipeline connecting Flint and Lake Huron is almost completed, the EPA wants an additional 3.5-mile pipeline constructed so that Flint residents can continue to be supplied with drinking water from the GLWA in Detroit while raw KWA water, treated at the Flint Water Treatment Plant, is tested for six months. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality is expected to pay $4.2 million of the pipeline cost through a grant, with the loan covering the balance of the cost. Even though the funds the Strategic Fund has approved is in the form of a loan, with 2% interest and 15 years of payments beginning in October of 2018, state officials said they were considering various funding sources to repay the loan so cash-strapped Flint will not be on the hook for the money. Time is of the essence; Flint’s emergency contract for Detroit water, which has already been extended, is currently scheduled to end next June 30th.  

Waiting for Godot. Last April 27th, East Cleveland Mayor Gary Norton wrote to Ohio State Tax Commissioner Joseph W. Testa for approval for his city to file chapter 9 bankruptcy: “Given East Cleveland’s decades-long economic decline and precipitous decrease in revenue, the City is hereby requesting your approval of its Petition for Municipal Bankruptcy. Despite the City’s best Efforts, East Cleveland is insolvent pursuant…Based upon Financial Appropriations projections for the years 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019, the City will be unable to sustain basic Fire, Police, EMS or rubbish collection services. The City has tried to negotiate with its creditors in good faith as required by 11 U.S.C. 109. It has been a somewhat impracticable effort. The City’s Financial Recovery Plan, approved by the City Council, the Financial Commission and the Fiscal Supervisors, while intended to restore the City to fiscal solvency, will have the effect of decimating our safety forces. Hence, our goal to effect a plan that will adjust our debts pursuant to 11 U.S.C. 109 puts us in a catch-22 that is unrealistic. This is particularly true now that petitions for Merger/Annexation with the City of Cleveland have been delayed by court action in the decision of Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge Michael Russo, Court Case No. 850236.” Mayor Norton closed his letter: “Thank you for your prompt consideration of this urgent matter.” He is still waiting.

 

What Is a State’s Role When a Municipality Can No Longer Provide Essential Public Services?

eBlog, 9/27/16

Good Morning! In this a.m.’s eBlog, we consider the risk of municipal fiscal contagion—and what the critical role of a state might be as the small municipality of Petersburg, Virginia’s fiscal plight appears to be spreading to neighboring municipalities and utilities: Virginia currently lacks a clearly defined legal or legislated route to address not just insolvency, but also to avoid the spread of fiscal contagion. Then we journey to Atlantic City, where a comparable fiscal challenge—but in a state with a much longer history of state-local consideration—appears on the verge of a total state takeover: we ask whether the city’s end is nigh: will the state, in fact, take it over? Then we turn to the school yards in Chicago, where a threatened teacher strike augurs fiscal downgrades and worse fiscal math for Chicago Public Schools—a city beleaguered by this year’s terrible increase in murders and now unsettling math.

When It Rains, It Pours. The small Virginia municipality of Petersburg, near insolvency–or its tipping point, uncertain of what role the Commonwealth of Virginia will take in a state where, were the city to file a chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy petition, its municipal bondholders holding bonds to which statutory liens have attached would continue to receive payments on those bonds, [§15.2-5358], now is confronted by the filing of two similar lawsuits, accusing the city of repeated failures to meet payment due dates. The fiscal crisis is finally forcing the State of Virginia to contemplate what role it might have to take—a role which would set a precedent in a state which does not specifically authorize its municipal entities to file for municipal bankruptcy—and where the only such petition filed—by an economic development authority—was dismissed. The likely mechanism that will leave the state little alternative but to act is likely to be the filing of two lawsuits against the city over past-due payments—suits alleging similar accusations of repeated failures to meet payment due dates even before Petersburg’s fiscal problems evolved into a crisis: the South Central Wastewater Authority last week filed a lawsuit against the city, seeking more than $1 million and the appointment of a receiver to make sure the money the authority says it is owed is not spent by the city on other things, with the suit alleging: “Since 2011, city officials have failed to regularly and timely bill and collect monies for wastewater services and have failed to make payments due and owing to South Central.”

The second suit, filed last month by a road paving company, alleges that Petersburg failed to make payments on time for the company’s work repaving U.S. Route 460 East—a contract which specified that the company would receive payment within 30 days of the work being billed. In its filing, however, the company noted that its bills were paid late and that many times “those checks bore dates that made it appear they had been issued on time pursuant to the contract terms, even though delivery did not occur until weeks or months later.” The company’s corporate credit manager and chief financial officer met in July 2015 with Petersburg’s then Finance Director to discuss the problems—in the wake of which the city proposed a very delayed schedule—late enough that the company halted work on the project. The suit charges it has been left with an unpaid balance of about $214,000, so that it is seeking payment of that balance plus interest of 1 percent per month. For its part, the South Central Wastewater Authority alleges a similar pattern of late payments stretching back to mid-2011: “Since 2011, city officials have failed to regularly and timely bill and collect monies for wastewater services and have failed to make payments due and owing to South Central…This failure by Petersburg became sustained and serious beginning in the middle of 2012 and has become chronic and severe since…Despite continuous communication and extraordinary forbearance by [South Central] regarding Petersburg’s payment practices, which only resulted in repeated assurances of payment followed by more broken commitments, Petersburg has now altogether ceased making payments.” The suit charges the city is delinquent by $1.2 million, excluding penalty fees. Another $410,000 came due on the first of this month, according to the lawsuit. Because the Authority, moreover, provides wastewater treatment for the municipalities of Petersburg and Colonial Heights, and the counties of Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, and Prince George; and because Petersburg uses about half of the wastewater plant’s capacity, South Central’s complaint notes that  if Petersburg continues to fail to make payments, the authority will have to ask the other municipalities to pay higher rates, or it may be forced to shut down the treatment plant—a shutdown which, the utility notes, “would endanger public health and require an alternate means of treatment to prevent the flow of untreated wastewater directly into the Appomattox River…Planning, permitting, financing and construction of new facilities would take years. The scale and seriousness of this crisis cannot be overstated.” Indeed, the scale and complexity of the growing list of creditors of the municipality unearthed by auditors last summer determined Petersburg owed a total of about $3.4 million to six regional organizations: South Central, the Appomattox River Water Authority, the Central Virginia Waste Management Authority and Riverside Regional Jail, Crater Youth Care and the District 19 Community Services Board. It has become increasingly apparent that Petersburg’s fiscal problems have become contagious to adjacent municipalities and essential public services, so that, increasingly, the Commonwealth of Virginia will be forced to act.

Indeed, Virginia Secretary of Finance Richard D. Brown last week briefed members of the General Assembly’s Finance Committees on his department’s effort to help Petersburg figure out how to close its $12 million budget gap and generate enough cash flow to both keep the city government operating and to begin to pay down a debt that has ballooned to nearly $19 million. But, as it has become apparent the city likely will simply be unable to get out by itself, its fiscal collapse risks spreading—as can be noted from the impact of its non-payment to a regional facility—adjacent municipalities, it would appear the Governor and Virginia legislature will have little choice but to both act on measures to protect the state’s AAA credit rating, but also to prevent the fiscal distress from spreading. The Virginian Commission on Local Government, which has measured local fiscal distress in the state for three decades: notes in its stress index measures cities’ and counties’ revenue capacity, revenue effort, and median household income: it ranks Petersburg as the third-most fiscally stressed locality in Virginia—behind Emporia and Buena Vista.

The increasing apprehension in Richmond has led the Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, Del. S. Chris Jones (R-Suffolk) to ask: “How did this get this bad without anyone knowing about it?” It also triggered his appointment last week of Del. R. Steven Landes (R-Augusta) to head a subcommittee to study states dealing with fiscally stressed localities and come up with solutions if a situation similar to that in Petersburg were to occur elsewhere in Virginia—or, as the Chairman put it: “We want to do our due diligence to see if there is legislation we might have to put in place to give authority to the state in certain circumstances to potentially take action…Right now, we don’t have the authority to do this, which is why I thought it is important to have this subcommittee between now and January and then begin the process to come up with some legislation.” In doing so, the Chairman emphasized that the state legislature will look primarily for proposals aimed at protecting the state’s interests—not those of the troubled localities, stating: “We are elected to represent our citizens at the state level, and we have our AAA bond rating to consider.” For his part, Chairman Landes said his committee will also examine the state’s options with regard to steps it could take to shorten its response time when a locality is heading toward the fiscal cliff, noting: “We want to make sure that audit information is getting to the money committees and the administration, because we would much rather be kept abreast sooner rather than later,” even as he vowed that a “bailout” for Petersburg is out of the question, noting: “I’m not aware where the state has ever stepped in to provide a locality a bailout…I don’t see that happening.”

Balancing on the Prick of the NeedleWhile it seems clear that neither the Governor nor the Legislature have much willingness to either grant municipal bankruptcy or provide significant fiscal assistance; nevertheless, there appears to be recognition that should Petersburg default, it would have implications for other municipalities in the state, especially if there were a default—such a default—increasingly possible in Petersburg’s case, because it is unclear how Petersburg, by Saturday, will come up with a $1.4 million principal-and-interest payment owed to the Virginia Resources Authority, a premier funding source for local government infrastructure financing through bond and loan programs. Under Virginia’s intercept provision, the Commonwealth is authorized to seize dollars it directs to localities for services, such as for schools, police and welfare, and use them, instead, to make scheduled payments on bonds to avoid default.

Interim City Manager Dironna Moore Belton acknowledged in an email last week that in order to secure short-term financing and bring long-term stability to the city, it cannot default on its loan payments. But Ms. Belton did not provide any specifics about from where she would take these dollars: “The city regularly collects revenues which go toward paying obligations…(and) has set aside dollars from incoming revenue to make the VRA payment;” however, in light of the $1.2 million lawsuit filed last week by the South Central Wastewater Authority, calls for the city to file for chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy have grown louder at public meetings and on internet message boards. However, as one expert commentator warns: “The state’s position is that Petersburg has dug themselves into a very unusual hole, and that they are going to have to take some very stringent and even draconian steps to get their house in order.” It is no longer certain, however, that the municipality has the capacity to get out by itself—indeed, it seems that, more likely than not, its fiscal tribulations will, increasingly, adversely affect neighboring public utilities and jurisdictions. According to Secretary Brown, the possibility of the city defaulting on bond payments is very real—a default which would leave the municipality with few alternatives—to which the Secretary remarked: “Some say that if it’s gotten to the point where they can’t operate, they should look at their charter and un-incorporate.” Such incorporation, however, would be a version of passing the buck—after all: which government would then be responsible for not only providing essential public services, but also paying off the growing mountain of municipal debts?

Thirsty City. Just as the provision of drinking water was a difficult issue in Detroit’s chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, and has become so in Petersburg, so too the issue has arisen in San Bernardino, where the city’s municipal water department has announced water bills will increase by an average of $3.50 starting in October—with some of the increased  costs triggered by a state mandated water reduction goal of 28% this past summer—even as the utility notes the importance of conserving water during winter months: the Board of Water Commissioners, which is responsible for water rates in the city, voted unanimously to impose the higher rates, the first increase in four years; the city has approved further increases to go into effect next July 1st and in the subsequent July 1st of 2018. Again, just as in Detroit, virtually all who attended the session and vote came away angry—as the city water department’s General Manager put it: “For all of us, the last thing we want to do is cause economic distress to people…But we need to take care of what we’ve got, or we’re going to end up spending more in the future.” Since the city’s last rate increase, the water department has had to deal with California’s historic drought; the rising cost of imported water; new water quality regulations; and other expenses. Cost-cutting efforts include operating with fewer employees than in 2007, requiring employees to pay for a larger portion of their benefits, and securing as much as $350,000 in rebates from Southern California Edison, according to the water department. According to the water department website, the average water bill in San Bernardino, will be just under $50 per month, higher than average in adjacent Riverside and Redlands, but less than in Colton, Rialto, the East Valley Water District, the Cucamonga Valley Water District, the West Valley Water District and Fontana. Unlike Detroit, where one of the most difficult issues for then U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes was how to balance the critical public health and safety issues related to water versus affordability; that question appears not to have arisen in San Bernardino.

Can a City Maintain its Sovereignty? Just as the question of sovereignty for a municipality in Virginia has become an issue, so too the question of whether the State of New Jersey will take over Atlantic  City and dissolve its sovereignty, after the New Jersey Division of Local Government Services notified Atlantic City that it has until Monday to comply with the terms of a $73 million state loan or face the possibility of default, warning that, because the city is in violation of its loan terms, it must act swiftly to “cure the breach.” As part of its effortsd to cure that “breach,” Atlantic City has reached an agreement with its water utility to purchase its old municipal airport property in a deal that officials of the city hope will help it avoid a state takeover. The Municipal Utilities Authority, which provides Atlantic City’s drinking water and is financially independent from the city, plans to purchase the 143-acres of the former Bader Field airport for at least $100 million through bonding, officials announced at a press conference yesterday, with Mayor Donald Guardian touting the partnership as a way of maintaining both the city and utility’s “sovereignty” while also helping the city dig its way out of more than $500 million of total debt. Mayor Guardian said he hopes the agreement, one which still needs city council and state approval, prevents New Jersey’s Local Finance Board from taking action after it violated the terms of a $73 million bridge loan that called for dissolving the MUA. Nevertheless, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs declined to comment on whether the Local Finance Board would accept the Atlantic City MUA plan—a key apprehension after that Board last Thursday had imposed a deadline of next Monday to fix a breach of a condition on its $73 million bridge loan or face a possible default where the state could seek full repayment and withhold state aid—indeed, under the terms of last July’s loan agreement mandating the city needed to dissolve the MUA by September 15th, the state could demand full repayment of the $73 million loan and withhold state aid if the city were unable to avert a default by the October 3 deadline. For his part, MUA Executive Director Bruce Ward said the authority will get an agreement with the city before deciding how to proceed with the property. Mr. Ward added that floating a bond for the Bader Field purchase is attainable and that the MUA has advisors who will help strategize the borrowing. The MUA has $15.7 million in annual revenues with $16.6 million of net water revenue debt outstanding, according to Moody’s Investors Service.

Learning about Debt—or Failing Grades? Moody’s yesterday awarded a failing credit grade to Chicago Public Schools, downgrading CPS’ bond rating further into junk status, lowering its view of the school system’s debt one notch to a B3 rating, citing a variety of factors, including CPS’ reliance on short-term borrowing, a “deepening structural deficit,” and a budget “built on unrealistic expectations” of help from a state government with money woes of its own. If there could be fiscal insult to financial injury, it arrived yesterday when CPS announced budgets at about 300 schools would lose a total of $45 million because of enrollment declines, and the Chicago Teachers Union said its members authorized a strike if contract talks break down. Unsurprisingly, that led the ever so moody Moody’s to warn that its debt rating could decline even further—a downgrade that would make the school district’s borrowing more expensive, even as CPS’ Board is set to vote Wednesday on the system’s $338 million capital budget—a budget projected to swell amid plans to borrow up to $945 million in long-term debt for a variety of other school infrastructure projects. For its part, the union yesterday announced that more than 95% of members who submitted a ballot last week voted in favor of authorizing a strike, easily crossing the requisite 75% threshold: CTU’s House of Delegates will meet Wednesday to discuss a possible strike date which could come as soon as October 11th—a strike, were it to occur, which added to Moody’s fiscal moodiness, as it noted CPS’ “increasingly precarious liquidity position and acute need for cash flow borrowing to support ongoing operations…The downgrade is also based on CPS’s deepening structural deficit, with budgets that are built on unrealistic expectations of assistance from the State of Illinois, which faces its own financial challenges. The rating also incorporates escalating pension contribution requirements, strong employee bargaining groups that impede cost cutting efforts, and elevated debt service expenses.” (CPS is offering raises in a new multi-year contract offer but it wants to phase out the $130 million annual tab for covering 7% of teachers’ 9% pension contribution. The union argues that the contract offer results in a pay cut and is strike-worthy.)

Leadership–and the Lack thereof: what Might that Mean vis-a-vis Municipal Bankruptcy?

eBlog, 9/19/16

In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the green light the Detroit Financial Review has given to Detroit, before heading east to the capital city of Hartford—a city fighting to avert municipal bankruptcy, and then veering south to Opa-Locka, Florida: a city that seems doomed to go into chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy. It seems that severe municipal fiscal distress can arise from human failures—and recovery, as we are experiencing in Detroit—can arise from great leadership. Distress—and municipal insolvency—can arise from great, state-blessed inequity: an issue in Michigan, California, Kansas, Connecticut, etc. Even though the cost of municipal bankruptcy can far outweigh what it would have cost for states to address fiscal disparities—as the recent court decision in Connecticut found: “[T]he state’s current system ‘has left rich school districts to flourish and poor school districts to founder,’ betraying its promise in the State Constitution to give children a ‘fair opportunity for an elementary and secondary school education.’”  

A Major Step Forward. The Detroit Financial Review Commission, created as part of Detroit’s exit from the largest municipal bankruptcy in the nation’s history to oversee the city’s recovery, has declared the city was in substantial compliance with the terms of its plan of debt adjustment—both a measure of the hard work of Mayor Mike Duggan, but also a key step towards the city’s exit from state oversight. The thumbs up came in the wake of certification of an audit of the city’s FY2015 budget; the city faces comparable hurdles over its next two, consecutive fiscal years in order to remove the state yoke under the provisions of the Michigan law adopted two years ago to govern the city’s path out of chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy. Unsurprisingly, Mayor Duggan described the Good Housekeeping state seal of approval as a “major step forward: The Legislature set up a process that said the city can earn its way out of direct financial oversight, and it has to balance the budgets and pay its bills for three straight years…I couldn’t be more pleased that we have one year down, and we’ve been certified as being fully compliant with the statute.” The Motor City has posted surpluses in recent years on the city’s nearly $1 billion annual budget; the city administration projects a balanced FY2017 budget: the prize: If the city stays within budget, and an audit is certified in 2018, Detroit could end nearly a decade of direct oversight and go into a period when the review commission would be mostly dormant, freeing the city to operate without getting required approval from the review commission on matters including budgets, budget amendments, contracts, and labor agreements.

That does not, however, mean the long road to recovery is easy: Detroit still faces fiscal challenges in the long-term, including a $490-million shortfall in pension funding the city will have to pay in the coming years—a challenge which, if unmet, would retrigger a renewed three-year period of state oversight by the review commission. Nevertheless, State Treasurer Nick Khouri congratulated city officials for getting to this point, calling it a “milestone for the city,” even as Detroit CFO John Hill noted the declaration starts the clock on the city’s path back to local control: “It really does put us on a path to the city having almost full control of its financial operations…”It’s a major milestone and an acknowledgement that we’ve made a lot of progress.”

Staving Off Chapter 9 Municipal Bankruptcy. First-term Hartford, Connecticut Mayor Luke Bonin is scrambling to fix what he terms a “broken system” and keep his city out of chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, albeit noting that he is confronted by a broken system that relies 100 percent on property taxes for local revenue—or, as he puts it: “You’ve got a city that just doesn’t have enough property. It’s got less property than the surrounding towns.” His uphill challenge as Mayor of the state’s capital city has garnered the support of the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities, whose Executive Director, Kevin Maloney, is supporting by seeking a regional approach through his organization: “Work cooperatively with the suburban towns to find where services can be shared and be done regionally, which would not only reduce the cost for the cities, but hopefully would reduce the costs for suburban towns.” The Conference has already created a panel with leaders from larger cities such as the chapter 9-experienced city of Bridgeport, as well as New Haven and Waterbury, as well as suburbs that will meet monthly to discuss this option. For his part, Mayor Bronin notes: “This isn’t about Hartford’s success or failure. This is about Connecticut’s success or failures, the region’s success or failure. You can’t be a suburb of nowhere, you can’t be a region or a growing state if you’ve got a city that’s in crisis.” Nevertheless, the challenge will be great: Hartford confronts nearly a $50 million hole in this year’s budget, which has left city services at a bare minimum, and the city could face another $50 million deficit next year. Or, as the mayor puts it: “You can’t cut your way to growth and you can’t tax your way to growth.” Indeed, it seems that he recognizes the city will be unable to get out of its fiscal debts by itself; consequently, he is pressing for regional tax and revenue measures to help Connecticut’s cities, urging the Connecticut Municipal Finance Advisory Commission: “We do not see a way the city of Hartford can avoid projected deficits on our own without some significant reforms at the state and regional levels.” Absent some fiscal assistance, the Mayor warns the state capital could run out of cash before the end of this year: he projects a nearly $23 million deficit in this fiscal year’s budget, but warns the fiscal chasm could more than double by next year—reaching a level of nearly 20% of total expenses by FY2018. Ergo, he suggests, regionalization could stave off municipal bankruptcy: “We want to do everything to avoid that, because I don’t think it would be good for the state of Connecticut; I don’t think would be good for the region, and I don’t think it would be ideal for the city of Hartford.”

Capital Bankruptcy? Hartford, were it to seek chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, would only be the second state capital in U.S. history to file for municipal bankruptcy—but that earlier effort turned out to be a botched one: the filing, by Pennsylvania’s capital city, Harrisburg, a filing done over the objections of the Mayor, was rejected by the courts as being non-compliant with Pennsylvania’s municipal bankruptcy authority—indeed, five years ago on August 1, 2011, Pennsylvania’s Governor signed into law new legislation that would bar any “City of the Third Class” from filing a chapter 9 petition, specifically referencing Harrisburg. It would also be only the second time a municipality in the state had sought chapter 9 protection: Bridgeport, filed for Chapter 9 bankruptcy in 1991, but a federal judge rejected the filing, because the city did not meet the U.S. Bankruptcy court’s definition of insolvency. Nevertheless, unlike almost every other chapter 9 filing in U.S. history, the effort in Connecticut is unique, because Mayor Bronin and other Connecticut mayors are seeking to craft a legislative package in the state legislature which would lessen reliance on the property tax, and move towards a Denver or St. Paul-Minneapolis type of regional tax—in no small part because Hartford, not unlike other New England capital cities, has less taxable property than several its surrounding suburban cities. According to Moody’s Investors Service, general fund reserves for the three cities range from 0.3% to 3.7% of fiscal 2015 revenues, well below the 12.9% state median for Moody’s-rated cities. Our respected colleagues at Municipal Market Analytics suggest that Hartford could model its regional recovery approach after what Pittsburgh has accomplished, as we noted in our report on the city—but, as MMA put it: “If its problems are left unaddressed, its fiscal position and attractiveness as a regional business center will reasonably continue to decline.” Nevertheless, the Mayor’s road ahead will be steep: His request earlier this year to Connecticut General Assembly oversight panel failed to gain a response—forcing the City Council to approve what the Mayor had deemed a $553 million “doomsday” budget calling for across-the-board service cuts. Municipal debt service, according to Mayor Bronin, spiked more than 50 percent to $31 million this year: it is projected to soar to $61 million by FY2020-21.

It is not that Mayor Bronin is new to this municipal challenge: even though he is a first-year mayor, he has previous experience as former chief counsel to Gov. Daniel Malloy. Mayor Bronin is seeking increased payments in lieu of taxes, regional revenue sharing, ala the Twin Cities or Denver regional area, as well as widening options for local revenue generation—albeit knowing that in a state where Connecticut Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher this month ordered the state to make changes in everything from how its schools are financed to which students are eligible to graduate from high school to how teachers are paid and evaluated, holding that “Connecticut is defaulting on its constitutional duty” to give all children an adequate education, Connecticut is a state here inequality appears to be the norm. Judge Moukawsher’s decision, in response to a lawsuit filed more than a decade ago claiming the state had undercut the allocation of school funding to its poorest district, is certain to require to reconsider nearly every aspect of public school financing—or as long-time Bridgeport Mayor Joseph Ganim put it: “This is a game changer…It’s an indictment of the application of the system, and of the system itself.” Inequity seems to be the rule of thumb in the state—a state where state-local collaboration is a tall order. Nonetheless, Connecticut Comptroller Kevin Lembo notes: “The mayor is on the absolute right track in trying to tie their fates together, but it’s not going to happen just because someone asks for it to happen, and the state is never likely to mandate that…You can look at ways to build partnerships. For example, not driving office parks out to the suburbs by giving the suburban communities a piece of the property tax action when they build downtown.” He added that such partnerships could include communities which are losing population, but have “very sophisticated and high-performing school districts” to attract more children from stressed city school districts. Nevertheless, he also noted the state should examine cities’ books and propose sustainable remedies: “Historically the state has always just thrown money at a perceived problem, less so in the suburbs, more so in the cities…We’ve always solved the short-term problem, and then walked on and dealt with something else.” Finally, he noted, the state has “a couple of more cards to play” to benefit Hartford, including the sale of vacant space—an interesting observation—and one that was of key concern to the nearby capital of Providence as it danced on the edge of municipal bankruptcy, even as nearby Central Falls went into chapter 9. As Comptroller Lembo notes: Connecticut has a “ton of property in Hartford and all over the state. Some producing, some of it is sitting there, just empty office buildings,” leading him to ask: “When was the last time somebody calculated the value of that asset? It may be putting more property back on the tax rolls in Hartford.” Moody’s last week deemed Judge Moukawsher’s ruling a credit positive for Hartford, Bridgeport, and New Haven: “If the court’s ruling holds, we believe funding levels for schools in low-income communities will increase and could occur in two ways: 1) Increased funding could be distributed through a reallocation, where funding is shifted from more affluent municipalities. Or, 2) the state could expand the total pie, increasing spending for some cities while allowing more affluent communities to maintain existing funding levels or receive some increases.”

On the Road to Chapter 9? It seems that municipal bankruptcy can be a product of criminal behavior—certainly a key factor in Detroit’s road to the nation’s largest-ever municipal bankruptcy—or incompetence. It might be that for the small city of Opa-locka, Florida: it is a combination. Now a business owner who worked with the FBI to uncover shakedowns by city officials has, this week, filed suit in federal court claiming he suffered years of what he described as “extortion, coercion, threats and intimidation” which violated his civil rights and right to due process. The owner, Mr. Francisco Zambrana, has laid out details of his efforts to obtain a business license—one which he was never able to gain. In his suit, he describes his version of his encounters with key city officials, including City Commissioner Luis Santiago, and a then-assistant city manager, David Chiverton, claiming each had demanded payoffs for a business license he never received—or, as his complaint cites: “From the onset, Zambrana simply sought to obtain an occupational license…Zambrana would repeatedly tell the city officials and employees who would care to listen that all he wanted to do was work and provide for his family, including teenage son who was battling cancer.” The suit could hardly have arisen at a more awkward moment: the small municipality, under investigation by the state and under the control of a state-appointed financial oversight board, is in the midst of public hearings to develop its FY2017 budget—but unable to pay its current bills. The suit, ergo, can hardly be settled—likely numbering the luckless Mr. Zambrana in a crowd of debtors for some future plan of debt adjustment. In his complaint, Mr. Zambrana described the municipality’s “practice and custom of threatening, intimidating, and extorting individuals” based on national origin to operate a business in the city. The suit adds: “The practice and custom was authorized by policymakers within the city, and it was a widespread practice so permanent and well-settled as to constitute a custom or usage with the force of law.” In this instance, Mr. Zambrana, finding an unresponsive municipality, leapt two levels to the federal government: he went to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and agreed to work with the FBI to uncover the shakedown scheme, an investigation whose findings led to by then City Manager Chiverton to plead guilty to pocketing payoffs. His suit cites the municipality as the sole defendant—likely recognizing the lack of any remote possibility from Mr. Chiverton—and he has requested a jury trial. In the category of fiscal misery loves company, the litigation costs to Opa-Locka’s taxpayers is accruing: the suit follows in the wake of one former City Manager Roy Stephen Shiver filed at the end of last month in U.S. District Court in the wake of receiving permission to so file from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to file a complaint alleging racial discrimination: the suit claims he was defamed by a trumped-up allegation that he accepted a bribe—and that, last November, he was fired without proper cause by city commissioners and the mayor, all of whom are black. Indeed, it was the former city manager who first reported Opa-Locka’s serious financial problems to Gov. Rick Scott just about a year ago—a report which contributed to the state appointment of a state financial oversight board to handle all city expenses, including legal fees. Even as the state ponders action, it will not be alone: the Securities and Exchange Commission has opened an inquiry into some of the city’s bonds, which were issued as its financial condition was severely deteriorating, and the FBI’s investigation is ongoing.

Once & Future Cities

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eBlog, 7/29/16

In this morning’s eBlog, we consider the critical, successful first effort by the City of Detroit to issue full faith and credit municipal debt–an effort complicated by the still unsettled fiscal situation of Detroit’s public school system; we examine the next chapter in the Chris Christie saga and Atlantic City’s efforts to avoid a default and /or state takeover. Finally, we consider the governance and leadership challenges that might threaten Detroit’s emergence and return to being the nation’s center of innovation.

Returning to the Municipal Market. As we wrote in anticipation yesterday, Detroit issued its first post-municipal bankruptcy debt in the wake of last month’s unanimous approval by the Detroit City Council of the issuance of up to $660 million of refunding bonds (a tax-exempt issuance projected by the city to save an estimated $37 million and help pave the Motor City’s return to the municipal bond market after emerging from the largest municipal bankruptcy in American history.) The sale encountered strong investor demand—and the successful sale will achieve budget savings that will facilitate the Motor City’s ability to provide budgetary and property tax relief—as well as resources to put aside $30 million from a budget surplus to deal with a possible public pension funding shortfall of nearly $500 million. The success marked, ergo, Detroit’s first post-bankruptcy general obligation/distributable state aid backed bond sale issue, with Detroit CFO John Naglick noting: “We experienced broad and deep investor participation and the savings certainly (significantly) exceeded our expectations.” While the fiscally recovering city paid a penalty on the $615 million issue over comparably rated municipal securities compared to other municipalities and states, the sale benefited from strong demand. CFO Naglick described the successful sale as a vote of confidence in Detroit’s efforts to turn around its finances since emerging from the nation’s largest-ever municipal bankruptcy a year and a half ago. Without a doubt, a key part of the success must be attributed to the indirect state backing of the bonds—or, as fabulous Matt Fabian of Municipal Market Analytics described it: “[The sale] shows that there is a fair bit of faith in the state of Michigan…A program like Michigan’s Distributable State Aid (DSA) is what distressed or crippled governments use to get market access…The city is still relying on the state, and, in no way, is Detroit back. If these bonds had been unenhanced bonds from the city, it would have been a different story.” He added that the successful sale appeared to indicate both a lack of apprehension on the part of investors that Detroit could be driven back into chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, as well as investor understanding that the city’s full faith and credit is distinct from the severe fiscal challenges to the Detroit Public School system, or, as another analyst noted: “The city is not the school district, and the city has shown that at least in the first bankruptcy that this type of debt has been protected.”

Life Preserver. Claiming he was “tired of this,” New Jersey Governor Chris Christie yesterday approved a $74 million loan to Atlantic City—warning the city’s leaders to accept the loan—and its terms—or face municipal bankruptcy. The terms of the loan, however, are steep: under the state’s terms, if the municipality is unable to pay it back, the state would be authorized to seize critical municipal assets, including Atlantic City’s water utility and its former airport, break union contracts, and assume major decision-making powers from the city’s government for five years. The terms of the loan grants the city until November to come up with a five-year plan to address its fiscal insolvency. The formal announcement of the loan means Atlantic City can avoid default on Monday and make payments on an additional $18.6 million owed in municipal debt service for the rest of this year; the funds will also be critical in enabling Atlantic City to devise a five-year financial plan. As we wrote yesterday, Atlantic City Mayor Don Guardian and City Council President Marty Small have vowed Atlantic City will have a plan to close a $100 million shortfall in next year’s budget in time for the state-imposed Nov. 3rd deadline. If Atlantic City fails to submit a plan by Nov. 3rd, or if the plan is rejected, the state can sell city assets. Indeed, Mayor Guardian yesterday released a statement saying the city will make payroll today, as well as Monday’s debt payment: “We anticipate that the bridge loan agreement with the state will be completed in short order and the funding required by the act will be put in place to cover operational expenses of the city.”

A Challenge to Innovation & Leadership. I noted a truly extraordinary phenomenon yesterday to a class I was teaching to a visiting cohort from China at George Washington University on Innovation, where I spoke of the remarkable movement of the Silicon Valley, this country’s center of innovation for the last quarter century, to Detroit, because of the recognition of the immense changes ahead from the development of self-driving cars. But, unlike the Silicon Valley Partnership, where the high-tech industry, 22 cities and counties, and my old alma mater, Stanford, and San Jose State University devote themselves, annually, to acting (and issuing a report) on the steps most critical to making the region the most vital and compelling location in the globe for innovative CEO’s to locate, the exceptional opportunity for Detroit to become the nation’s center of innovation, once again, could now be jeopardized by the region’s seeming inability to demonstrate governance leadership. There appears to be a growing rift between counties in the region—a governance rift which has undercut plans to place a 20-year transportation millage before Metro Detroit voters in November. The Regional Transit Authority (RTA) board yesterday rejected, on a 5-4 vote, putting a 1.2-mil tax on the November ballot in the wake of opposition from officials from Macomb and Oakland Counties. Their apprehensions related to whether each county would get its fair share of funding if the millage were approved, and if future votes would protect the interest of each county or just a few. The adverse vote now leaves uncertain the fate of critical funding for regional rapid transit, as well as a commuter rail line from Ann Arbor to Detroit, airport shuttle service, a universal fare card system, and other improvements. Paul Hillegonds, Chairman of the RTA’s board, said after the vote: “This board has gone as far as it can go” on the issue and now elected officials have “to figure it out,” even as he questioned whether county leaders have the political will to make necessary decisions so that a millage is not delayed for two to four years.

RTA officials from Macomb and Oakland counties were unified against the millage proposal, but had joined the board in approving the rest of a $4.6 billion regional transit plan; however, under the governance structure statute, placing a measure on the ballot from the RTA requires seven of nine votes: one from each county. Yesterday’s vote, thus, fell two votes short, with both pairs of Macomb and Oakland representatives voting against. Had it been adopted, the 20-year millage would have cost the owner of a $200,000 home about $120 annually. Now the time for the region’s future is short: the region faces an August 16 deadline to have the ballot language certified by county clerks to appear on the November ballot.

Constructing Post Municipal Bankruptcy City Futures

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eBlog, 6/29/16

In this morning’s eBlog, we welcome Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s leadership in taking up the House-passed PROMESA legislation today in the full Senate; Detroit gets a green light to refinance debt, enabling it to issue its first post-municipal bankruptcy general obligation debt; San Bernardino adopts its annual operating budget, marking its first steps towards a post-municipal bankruptcy fiscal sustainability; and Atlantic City hosts a public meeting to explain the steps it is taking to avoid a state takeover.

Puerto Rico: Ensuring Essential Public Services. The Senate will begin debate this morning on the House-passed PROMESA—with a final vote possible by this afternoon. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) started the process for consideration by filing for cloture late yesterday, so he will need 60 votes to bar any filibuster. U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew is warning the Senate that any delay in acting on the House-passed PROMESA legislation to avert insolvency could carry severe repercussions for the U.S. territory, advising Senators that if Congress fails to pass a bill by July 1, a torrent of litigation from creditors could put the territory’s public services at risk. Puerto Rico has $2 billion in debt payments due, and government officials have warned they have insufficient funds, leading the Secretary to warn: “In the event of default, and if creditor lawsuits are successful, a judge could immediately order Puerto Rico to pay creditors over essential services such as health, education, and public safety…This could force Puerto Rico to lay off police officers, shut down public transit, or close a hospital.” Sec. Lew added that were Congress to miss the July 1 deadline and pass something retroactively, it would be unable to halt such a judge’s order, meaning the island’s essential public services would be at risk: “Doing nothing now to end the debt crisis will result in a chaotic, disorderly unwinding with widespread consequences…Some well-funded creditors are working hard to delay legislative action this week, even if it comes at the expense of the Puerto Rican people.”

A Motor City Thumbs Up! The Detroit Financial Review Commission, the nine-member Financial Review Commission, created nearly two years ago to ensure the City of Detroit is meeting statutory requirements, and to review and approve the city’s four-year financial plan created as part of its plan of debt adjustment, and to establish programs and requirements for prudent fiscal management, yesterday provided an all clear to proceed with a refunding of $660 million of general obligation debt—a key step which Detroit Finance Director John Naglick described as the last step in the process for the city to return to the municipal bond market: he anticipates a late July, early August issuance date. Yesterday’s approval clears the deck for Detroit to issue its first full faith and credit debt since exiting the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history a little over a year and a half ago—with the projected savings estimated by Director Naglick to be as much as $40 million—savings which he said the city would use to provide budget and property tax relief. Detroit will refund up to $275 million of unlimited tax GO bonds the city sold in 2014, and as much as $385 million of limited tax GO bonds sold in 2010 and 2012. The bonds were issued through the Michigan Finance Authority and carry a backing of the city’s state distributable aid—in Michigan, a municipality can only pledge such distributable state aid on municipal bonds issued by the Michigan Finance Agency. Mr. Naglick added that the projected interest rate savings on the limited tax general obligation bonds will benefit Detroit’s general fund budget by as much as $15 million, while savings on the backed by the pledge of the issuer (generally a city or municipality) to raise taxes, without limit, to service the debt until it is repaid. Because of this feature, unlimited tax bonds may have higher credit ratings and offer lower yields than other comparable municipal bonds of the same maturity. The unlimited tax or UTGO bonds of $24 million, according to Mr. Naglick, will be used to lower the debt millage on the city’s property owners.

Roadmap to Sustainability. The Mayor and Council of San Bernardino have unanimously adopted a balanced budget for FY2016-17—a budget which, in stark contrast to recent years, includes no layoffs, or, as Councilwoman Virginia Marquez said after the vote: “Tonight really marks the first step in the right direction…Since the bankruptcy, we’ve lost a lot of great people. I’m glad to see that this year there are no layoffs needed.” As adopted, the operating budget (the capital budget is to be adopted later this summer) provides 752 employees—some 67 fewer than last fiscal year, but the difference is attributed to the city’s outsourcing of fire and refuse services—steps taken as part of the city’s plan of debt adjustment. In another sign of the city’s fiscal turnaround and steps towards sustainability, the budget includes $400,000 to finance step increases. City Manager Mark Scott presented the budget alongside an extensive list of items not included in the budget that could be wanted, including master plans for street lights and street paving, additional Code Enforcement Staffing and an expansion of the Quality of Life Team. He’ll bring groups of those suggestions to the City Council for possible addition later. Also coming up for discussion later are several items included in the budget that some council members indicated they might not approve. That includes $150,000 for “education” related to a proposed ballot measure to replace the city charter. The cost might be less than that, Mr. Scott said, once a potential expert in ballot item education — which is closely limited by law to prohibit advocacy in favor of the item — and Council members have the chance to approve or not approve the specifics once they are selected: “You’re not locking yourself into anything with your vote today,” Mr. Scott said. The budget projects $112.76 million in general fund revenue and $112.52 million in expenditures, a small surplus.

Betting on one’s City’s Future. Atlantic City Mayor Don Guardian yesterday reported that the city has hired public finance attorneys to restructure some of its $240 million of outstanding bond debt: the attorneys have been brought on to work on reducing the city’s debt load, much of which it took on to pay back casinos which had prevailed over the city on property tax appeals. The attorneys will be a key part of the city’s last gulp effort to put together a fiscal recovery/sustainability plan prior to October 1—where failure would doom the city to a state takeover. The Mayor and Council, at a public meeting last night, made clear the city will be seeking some assistance from surrounding Atlantic County. At the session, Councilman Kaleem Shabazz noted: “Bankruptcy scares investors away. It chills financial markets. Bankruptcy doesn’t solve our problems,” adding as a reminder, moreover, that whether or not the city can even seek municipal bankruptcy is a state rather than the city’s final decision. Thus, he noted: “Atlantic City is a functional, contributing part of the economic engine of the state, so we have to work together.”

For his part, Mayor Guardian spoke about steps the city has taken or is planning, including that the city will ask private companies for bids to see if they could save money on certain services, including trash and recycling, payroll, and towing. He said the city had also asked Atlantic County about sharing senior citizen transportation and some other services.

In describing actions the city has taken to ensure it can control its own destiny, he added the city has increased a number of fees, including for parking meters, which are expected to bring in nearly $800,000 this year, and double that amount next year. (The city’s fiscal year follows the calendar year.) Mayor Guardian said that since he took office in January of 2014, the city had reduced its workforce by 28 percent to 904 as of the end of April, with more employees leaving at the end of this week. The city will also receive $1.7 million for properties it auctioned off on June 23rd and, potentially, another $5 million combined for two other properties.