Municipal Finance Transparency

June 13, 2018

Good Morning! In this morning’s eBlog, we consider efforts in a  Puerto Rican municipality to focus on municipal finance transparency.

Toa Baja, a municipio of just under 90,000 in Puerto Rico, was first settled around 1511—long, long before Lexington and Concord. It was officially organized as a town in 1745, when it was dedicated to Nuestra Señora de la Concepción. By the dawn of U.S. independence in 1776, it was a town of some six cattle ranches and 12 sugar cane estates, but a town at risk of flooding because of the confluence of surrounding rivers. In 1902, in the wake of the U.S. invasion, the town became part of a consolidated region when the Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico approved the consolidation of a number of municipalities—before a 1905 statute annulled the statute and Toa Baja regained its status as an independent town. This municipio of around 90,000 divided into seven barrios or neighborhoods has not been a stranger to floods: nine years ago, former Governor Luis G. Fortuño ordered a shut off essential services, such as water and electricity, to Villas del Sol, a village within the municipality of Toa Baja, and FEMA actually purchased homes in the municipality from the Puerto Rican Government in order to ensure public safety.  What had been a farming-based economy, mostly sugar, turned increasingly to fishing, cattle, and then, by the 1950’s, manufacturing began to replace replacing agriculture, so that, today, it is a center for the manufacture of metal, plastic, concrete, textile, electrical, electronic machinery, and rum. The city’s leader, Mayor Anibel Vega Borges, was first elected in 2004; he has since been re-elected twice (2008 and 2012)—and by wide margins.

Now the city or ciudad is set to be a leader in fiscal transparency: it will be the first Puerto Rico municipality to publish its accounts, in the wake of signing an agreement with the Statistics Institute after Institute President Mario Marazzi urged all public agencies, including municipalities and public corporations, to make use of the Institute’s transparencyfinanciera.pr platform. Ergo, Alcalde or Mayor Bernardo “Betito” Márquez García will disclose, beginning with the fiscal year next month, all its transactions, evaluations of income, costs and benefits in order to ensure the public has access to inspect all its fiscal and financial actions—or, as Mayor Garcia put it:I understand that it is the right step. I think that the responsibility to administer the municipalities is shared with the people, and the people have to have the information to be an oversight of what is done with their resources.”

President Marazzi noted that his offer, made available in 2015, had, so far, only attracted two previous takers: the Institute of Statistics, and the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture, noting: “(Toa Baja) is the first municipality to take the step forward to provide extremely detailed information on their finances…Toa Baja is truly opening its books, here it is going to be done because the platform demands it: The platform requires a level of disclosure that definitely has to be someone with courage, who has nothing to hide,” as he urged all Puerto Rican agencies, public corporations, and municipalities to make use of the platform, stressing that, in times of fiscal crisis, the tool becomes even more useful to record how public funds are being used at the central and municipal levels, and also to recover the credibility of Puerto Rico before the financial markets, and—as he described it: “Give it a good goodbye to the [PROMESA] Board of Fiscal Supervision: All we need is that in our country, we have the political will to implement what already exists technologically.”

His initiative comes even as the Legislature is set to debate Senate Bill 236, the “Open Data Law of the Government of Puerto Rico.”

Mr. Marazzi described his effort by noting that “Lack of transparency is the best breeding ground for corruption, and sunlight–or transparency–is the best disinfectant,” adding that his Institute will also train municipal personnel in the use of the electronic platform, and in the handling and sending of the necessary information, at the same time that it will offer assistance, advice, and collaboration in the preparation of a work plan for the implementation of the project, Open Government, in Toa Baja, noting: “Governments do not have the resources to audit all the information. This will allow external auditors to help us find flaws in our data, (to identify) corruption.” Audit reports (from the Office of the Comptroller), he noted, take so much time that by the time they are made available, the proverbial cow is often already outside the barn.  

In turn, the Fundación Agenda Ciudadana will join the effort to educate the Tobajeña citizenship with the necessary skills to control the available information and use it in the democratic exercise. Mayor Márquez García emphasized this educational process, and indicated that a second phase of the project would be the search for participatory budgeting: “In my personal character, I think we had to work on this type of initiative for a long time … This will allow Mayors to be forced to render collective accounts … Here there must be active citizen participation. The responsibility is shared.”